ICD-10 Version: 2010

ICD-10 Version:2010

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ICD-10-CM Code A77.40

Ehrlichiosis, unspecified

  1. ICD-10-CM Index
  2. Chapter: A00–B99
  3. Section: A75-A79
  4. Block: A77
  5. A77.40 — Ehrlichiosis, unspecified

A77.40 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of ehrlichiosis, unspecified. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code A77.40 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like ehrlichia infection of the central nervous system or human ehrlichiosis.

Short Description: Ehrlichiosis, unspecified Long Description: Ehrlichiosis, unspecified

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code A77.40 are found in the index:

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Ehrlichia infection of the central nervous system
  • Human ehrlichiosis

  • EHRLICHIOSIS-. a tick borne disease characterized by fever; headache; myalgias; anorexia; and occasionally rash. it is caused by several bacterial species and can produce disease in dogs; cattle; sheep; goats; horses; and humans. the primary species causing human disease are ehrlichia chaffeensis; anaplasma phagocytophilum; and ehrlichia ewingii.

  • 867 — OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 868 — OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 869 — OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Rickettsioses (A75-A79)
      • Spotted fever [tick-borne rickettsioses] (A77)
  • FY 2016 — New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

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Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won’t hurt you — less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese.

But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli.

Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure.

If you spend time outdoors or have pets that go outdoors, you need to beware of ticks. Ticks are small bloodsucking parasites. Many species transmit diseases to animals and people. Some of the diseases you can get from a tick bite are Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and tularemia.

Some ticks are so small that they can be difficult to see. Ticks may get on you if you walk through areas where they live, such as tall grass, leaf litter or shrubs.

Tick-borne diseases occur worldwide, including in your own backyard. To help protect yourself and your family, you should

  • Use a chemical repellent with DEET, permethrin or picaridin
  • Wear light-colored protective clothing
  • Tuck pant legs into socks
  • Avoid tick-infested areas
  • Check yourself, your children and your pets daily for ticks and carefully remove any ticks you find
[Learn More]

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ICD-10-CM Code A69.2

Lyme disease

A69.2 is a «header» nonspecific and non-billable code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of lyme disease. The code is NOT valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions.

See also:  Tick – Official Minecraft Wiki
Short Description: Lyme disease Long Description: Lyme disease

Consider the following ICD-10 codes with a higher level of specificity:

  • A69.20 — . unspecified
  • A69.21 — Meningitis due to Lyme disease
  • A69.22 — Other neurologic disorders in Lyme disease
  • A69.23 — Arthritis due to Lyme disease
  • A69.29 — Other conditions associated with Lyme disease

The Tabular List of Diseases and Injuries is a list of ICD-10 codes, organized «head to toe» into chapters and sections with guidance for inclusions, exclusions, descriptions and more. The following references are applicable to the code A69.2:

Inclusion Terms

  • POST LYME DISEASE SYNDROME-. a condition caused by long lasting and ongoing infection with the spirochete borrelia burgdorferi resulting in progressive inflammatory neurologic neuromuscular and dermatologic manifestations including encephalitis; myelitis; acrodermatitis chronica atrophicans; and arthritis.
  • LYME DISEASE-. an infectious disease caused by a spirochete borrelia burgdorferi which is transmitted chiefly by ixodes dammini see ixodes and pacificus ticks in the united states and ixodes ricinis see ixodes in europe. it is a disease with early and late cutaneous manifestations plus involvement of the nervous system heart eye and joints in variable combinations. the disease was formerly known as lyme arthritis and first discovered at old lyme connecticut.
  • LYME NEUROBORRELIOSIS-. nervous system infections caused by tick borne spirochetes of the borrelia burgdorferi group. the disease may affect elements of the central or peripheral nervous system in isolation or in combination. common clinical manifestations include a lymphocytic meningitis cranial neuropathy most often a facial neuropathy polyradiculopathy and a mild loss of memory and other cognitive functions. less often more extensive inflammation involving the central nervous system encephalomyelitis may occur. in the peripheral nervous system b. burgdorferi infection is associated with mononeuritis multiplex and polyradiculoneuritis. from j neurol sci 1998 jan 8;1532:182 91
  • LYME DISEASE VACCINES-. vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent lyme disease.
  • BORRELIA BURGDORFERI-. a specific species of bacteria part of the borrelia burgdorferi group whose common name is lyme disease spirochete.

  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Other spirochetal diseases (A65-A69)
      • Other spirochetal infections (A69)
  • FY 2016 — New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

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Lyme disease is a bacterial infection you get from the bite of an infected tick. The first symptom is usually a red rash, which may look like a bull’s eye. But not all people with Lyme disease have a rash. As the infection spreads to other parts of the body, you may have

  • A fever
  • A headache
  • Body aches
  • A stiff neck
  • Fatigue

Lyme disease can be hard to diagnose because many of its symptoms are like those of the flu and other diseases. And you may not have noticed a tick bite. Your health care provider will look at your symptoms and medical history to figure out whether you have Lyme disease. Lab tests may not always give a clear answer until you have been infected for at least a few weeks.

Antibiotics can cure most cases of Lyme disease. The sooner treatment begins, the quicker and more complete the recovery.

After treatment, some patients may still have muscle or joint aches and nervous system symptoms. This is called post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). Long-term antibiotics have not been shown to help with PTLDS. However, there are ways to help with the symptoms of PTLDS, and most patients do get better with time.

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ICD-10-CM Code A69.21

Meningitis due to Lyme disease

  1. ICD-10-CM Index
  2. Chapter: A00–B99
  3. Section: A65-A69
  4. Block: A69
  5. A69.21 — Meningitis due to Lyme disease

A69.21 is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of meningitis due to lyme disease. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code A69.21 might also be used to specify conditions or terms like borrelia infection of central nervous system or meningitis caused by spirochaetes or meningitis in lyme disease.

Short Description: Meningitis due to Lyme disease Long Description: Meningitis due to Lyme disease

The Index to Diseases and Injuries is an alphabetical listing of medical terms, with each term mapped to one or more ICD-10 code(s). The following references for the code A69.21 are found in the index:

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Borrelia infection of central nervous system
  • Meningitis caused by Spirochaetes
  • Meningitis in Lyme disease

  • 867 — OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH MCC
  • 868 — OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITH CC
  • 869 — OTHER INFECTIOUS AND PARASITIC DISEASES DIAGNOSES WITHOUT CC/MCC
  • 088.81 — Lyme disease (Approximate Flag)
  • Certain infectious and parasitic diseases (A00–B99)
    • Other spirochetal diseases (A65-A69)
      • Other spirochetal infections (A69)
  • FY 2016 — New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020
See also:  Cleaning - How to get rid of Bedbugs? Lifehacks Stack Exchange

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Lyme disease is a bacterial infection you get from the bite of an infected tick. The first symptom is usually a red rash, which may look like a bull’s eye. But not all people with Lyme disease have a rash. As the infection spreads to other parts of the body, you may have

  • A fever
  • A headache
  • Body aches
  • A stiff neck
  • Fatigue

Lyme disease can be hard to diagnose because many of its symptoms are like those of the flu and other diseases. And you may not have noticed a tick bite. Your health care provider will look at your symptoms and medical history to figure out whether you have Lyme disease. Lab tests may not always give a clear answer until you have been infected for at least a few weeks.

Antibiotics can cure most cases of Lyme disease. The sooner treatment begins, the quicker and more complete the recovery.

After treatment, some patients may still have muscle or joint aches and nervous system symptoms. This is called post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). Long-term antibiotics have not been shown to help with PTLDS. However, there are ways to help with the symptoms of PTLDS, and most patients do get better with time.

Meningitis is inflammation of the thin tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord, called the meninges. There are several types of meningitis. The most common is viral meningitis. You get it when a virus enters the body through the nose or mouth and travels to the brain. Bacterial meningitis is rare, but can be deadly. It usually starts with bacteria that cause a cold-like infection. It can cause stroke, hearing loss, and brain damage. It can also harm other organs. Pneumococcal infections and meningococcal infections are the most common causes of bacterial meningitis.

Anyone can get meningitis, but it is more common in people with weak immune systems. Meningitis can get serious very quickly. You should get medical care right away if you have

  • A sudden high fever
  • A severe headache
  • A stiff neck
  • Nausea or vomiting

Early treatment can help prevent serious problems, including death. Tests to diagnose meningitis include blood tests, imaging tests, and a spinal tap to test cerebrospinal fluid. Antibiotics can treat bacterial meningitis. Antiviral medicines may help some types of viral meningitis. Other medicines can help treat symptoms.

There are vaccines to prevent some of the bacterial infections that cause meningitis.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

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ICD-9 Code 021.1

Enteric tularemia

  1. ICD-9 Index
  2. Chapter: 001–139
  3. Section: 020-027
  4. Block: 021 Tularemia
  5. 021.1 — Enteric tularemia

021.1 is a legacy non-billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of enteric tularemia. This code was replaced on September 30, 2015 by its ICD-10 equivalent.

021.1

ICD-9:
Short Description: Enteric tularemia
Long Description: Enteric tularemia

The following crosswalk between ICD-9 to ICD-10 is based based on the General Equivalence Mappings (GEMS) information:

  • Infectious and parasitic diseases (001–139)
    • Zoonotic bacterial diseases (020-027)
      • 021 Tularemia

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Information for Medical Professionals

References found for the code 021.1 in the Index of Diseases and Injuries:

Information for Patients

Bacteria are living things that have only one cell. Under a microscope, they look like balls, rods, or spirals. They are so small that a line of 1,000 could fit across a pencil eraser. Most bacteria won’t hurt you — less than 1 percent of the different types make people sick. Many are helpful. Some bacteria help to digest food, destroy disease-causing cells, and give the body needed vitamins. Bacteria are also used in making healthy foods like yogurt and cheese.

But infectious bacteria can make you ill. They reproduce quickly in your body. Many give off chemicals called toxins, which can damage tissue and make you sick. Examples of bacteria that cause infections include Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, and E. coli.

Antibiotics are the usual treatment. When you take antibiotics, follow the directions carefully. Each time you take antibiotics, you increase the chances that bacteria in your body will learn to resist them causing antibiotic resistance. Later, you could get or spread an infection that those antibiotics cannot cure.

NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  • Actinomycosis
  • Bacterial vaginosis — aftercare
  • Blood culture
  • Gram stain
  • Gram stain of skin lesion
  • Necrotizing soft tissue infection
  • Q fever
  • Serology for tularemia
  • Shigellosis
  • Stool Gram stain
  • Tularemia
[Read More]

If you spend time outdoors or have pets that go outdoors, you need to beware of ticks. Ticks are small bloodsucking parasites. Many species transmit diseases to animals and people. Some of the diseases you can get from a tick bite are Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and tularemia.

Some ticks are so small that they can be difficult to see. Ticks may get on you if you walk through areas where they live, such as tall grass, leaf litter or shrubs.

Tick-borne diseases occur worldwide, including in your own backyard. To help protect yourself and your family, you should

  • Use a chemical repellent with DEET, permethrin or picaridin
  • Wear light-colored protective clothing
  • Tuck pant legs into socks
  • Avoid tick-infested areas
  • Check yourself, your children and your pets daily for ticks and carefully remove any ticks you find
  • Colorado tick fever
  • Ehrlichiosis
  • Relapsing fever
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever
  • Serology for tularemia
  • Tick bite
  • Tick paralysis
  • Tick removal
  • Tularemia
[Read More]

General Equivalence Map Definitions
The ICD-9 and ICD-10 GEMs are used to facilitate linking between the diagnosis codes in ICD-9-CM and the new ICD-10-CM code set. The GEMs are the raw material from which providers, health information vendors and payers can derive specific applied mappings to meet their needs.

  • Approximate Flag — The approximate flag is on, indicating that the relationship between the code in the source system and the code in the target system is an approximate equivalent.
  • No Map Flag — The no map flag indicates that a code in the source system is not linked to any code in the target system.
  • Combination Flag — The combination flag indicates that more than one code in the target system is required to satisfy the full equivalent meaning of a code in the source system.

Index of Diseases and Injuries Definitions

  • And — The word «and» should be interpreted to mean either «and» or «or» when it appears in a title.
  • Code also note — A «code also» note instructs that two codes may be required to fully describe a condition, but this note does not provide sequencing direction.
  • Code first — Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology. For such conditions, the ICD-10-CM has a coding convention that requires the underlying condition be sequenced first followed by the manifestation. Wherever such a combination exists, there is a «use additional code» note at the etiology code, and a «code first» note at the manifestation code. These instructional notes indicate the proper sequencing order of the codes, etiology followed by manifestation.
  • Type 1 Excludes Notes — A type 1 Excludes note is a pure excludes note. It means «NOT CODED HERE!» An Excludes1 note indicates that the code excluded should never be used at the same time as the code above the Excludes1 note. An Excludes1 is used when two conditions cannot occur together, such as a congenital form versus an acquired form of the same condition.
  • Type 2 Excludes Notes — A type 2 Excludes note represents «Not included here». An excludes2 note indicates that the condition excluded is not part of the condition represented by the code, but a patient may have both conditions at the same time. When an Excludes2 note appears under a code, it is acceptable to use both the code and the excluded code together, when appropriate.
  • Includes Notes — This note appears immediately under a three character code title to further define, or give examples of, the content of the category.
  • Inclusion terms — List of terms is included under some codes. These terms are the conditions for which that code is to be used. The terms may be synonyms of the code title, or, in the case of «other specified» codes, the terms are a list of the various conditions assigned to that code. The inclusion terms are not necessarily exhaustive. Additional terms found only in the Alphabetic Index may also be assigned to a code.
  • NEC «Not elsewhere classifiable» — This abbreviation in the Alphabetic Index represents «other specified». When a specific code is not available for a condition, the Alphabetic Index directs the coder to the «other specified” code in the Tabular List.
  • NOS «Not otherwise specified» — This abbreviation is the equivalent of unspecified.
  • See — The «see» instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index indicates that another term should be referenced. It is necessary to go to the main term referenced with the «see» note to locate the correct code.
  • See Also — A «see also» instruction following a main term in the Alphabetic Index instructs that there is another main term that may also be referenced that may provide additional Alphabetic Index entries that may be useful. It is not necessary to follow the «see also» note when the original main term provides the necessary code.
  • 7th Characters — Certain ICD-10-CM categories have applicable 7th characters. The applicable 7th character is required for all codes within the category, or as the notes in the Tabular List instruct. The 7th character must always be the 7th character in the data field. If a code that requires a 7th character is not 6 characters, a placeholder X must be used to fill in the empty characters.
  • With — The word «with» should be interpreted to mean «associated with» or «due to» when it appears in a code title, the Alphabetic Index, or an instructional note in the Tabular List. The word «with» in the Alphabetic Index is sequenced immediately following the main term, not in alphabetical order.

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