Holy Cow! New (and Unusual) ICD-10 Codes

Holy Cow! New (and Unusual) ICD-10 Codes

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*Updated August 2019

In October 2015, the United States officially adopted the ICD-10 medical coding system. Much like the ICD-9 system before it, ICD-10 codes are unique alphanumerical sequences based on the International Classification of Diseases released by the World Health Organization (WHO). Healthcare providers use these codes to accurately record patient diagnoses, which facilitates the collection and sharing of diagnostic data as well as national and international mortality and injury statistics.

Though the ICD-10 coding system was developed in 2003 and updated annually based on WHO reports, U.S. implementation was delayed for several years. ICD-10 contains about 70,000 unique diagnostic codes, a stark contrast to ICD-9’s 13,000 codes. The new diagnosis codes are longer in ICD-10 than in ICD-9, increasing from three-to-five digits to three-to-seven digits. This drastic increase in the number of codes is accredited to the improved specificity of ICD-10 codes.

In the ICD-9 system, only 20 codes were used as broad diagnosis indicators for any injury resulting from an animal encounter. The ICD-10 system uses nearly 250 codes to describe specific injuries by various animals as well as the stage of treatment. The expansion of diagnosis codes within the ICD-10 system has allowed for extremely specific and often amusing new codes and descriptions, like those listed in the following tables.

Top 10 Animal Related Diagnoses by ICD-10 Code

Bitten by cat, initial encounter

Toxic effect of unspecified spider venom, accidental, initial encounter

Toxic effect of venom of bees, accidental, initial encounter

Toxic effect of unspecified snake venom, accidental, initial encounter

Toxic effect of rattlesnake venom, accidental, initial encounter

Toxic effect of venom of brown recluse spider, accidental, initial encounter

Toxic effect of venom of wasps, accidental, initial encounter

Fig 1 Data from Definitive Healthcare based on full-year 2018 reports of all-payer inpatient primary and secondary diagnoses. Full-year 2018 ICD-10 data is available in the Definitive Healthcare claims database. Partial-year 2019 data is also available.

There are 22 “chapters” in the ICD-10 coding system, each with a different letter denoting the diagnosis category. For example, chapter 19 is titled “Injury, poisoning, and certain other consequences of external causes.” The two letters used are S, for injuries, and T, for poisoning and other injuries caused by external encounters, and there are subcategories for each letter. Included under “T” are bites from venomous and poisonous animals and the effects of these toxins.

Chapter 20, “External causes of morbidity and mortality,” uses letters V through Y. The subcategory W50 is reserved for unintentional incidents where a patient is injured, accidentally or purposefully, by another person or animal. Though these incidents can certainly cause serious injury, the descriptions of these codes may come as a surprise to those reading them.

One code that stands out is W55.22XA, “struck by a cow.” While it is more common for people to be struck by a vehicle, one can still hope both cow and patient were being safe and wearing seat belts. Another standout is code W50.3XXA, “accidental bite by another person, initial encounter.” This is not to be confused with code Y041XXA, “assault by human bite subsequent encounter.”

Top 10 Non-Venomous Animal Related Diagnoses by ICD-10 Code (Alphabetical)

ICD-10 Code Description Total # Diagnoses ICD-9 Code
Scratched by cat, initial encounter Bitten by cat, subsequent encounter Struck by horse, initial encounter

Bitten or stung by nonvenomous insect and other nonvenomous arthropods, initial encounter

Bitten by dog, initial encounter

Bitten by cat, initial encounter

Bitten by dog, subsequent encounter

Accidental hit or strike by another person, initial encounter

Scratched by cat, initial encounter

Bitten by cat, subsequent encounter

Bitten or stung by nonvenomous insect and other nonvenomous arthropods, subsequent encounter

Struck by cow, initial encounter

Struck by dog, initial encounter

Fig 2 Data from Definitive Healthcare based on full-year 2018 reports of all-payer inpatient primary and secondary diagnoses. Does not include diagnoses involving venomous creatures. Full-year 2018 ICD-10 data is available in the Definitive Healthcare platform. Partial-year 2019 data (January to May 2019) is also available in the platform.

The shift from ICD-9 to ICD-10 codes will likely help healthcare providers and payers gain a better understanding of their patients and of overall population health. Because ICD-10 codes are so much more specific, providers can gather more detailed information faster, improving their ability to make informed treatment decisions. Additionally, because the codes themselves are specialized, physicians won’t have to spend as much time taking detailed notes to fill information gaps from generalized ICD-9 codes, improving diagnostic accuracy. This should increase overall efficiency and prevent errors in billing and reimbursement.

Other key differences between ICD-9 and ICD-10 codes involve detail about the patient’s condition. Where ICD-9 codes only stated the injury, ICD-10 codes give both injury and location. A venomous insect bite on the right lower leg will have a different ICD-10 code than the same injury on the lower left leg, and so on. Similarly, accidental injuries have different diagnosis codes than purposeful injuries, such as with codes T63.441A, “toxic effect of bee venom, accidental” and T63.442A, “toxic effect of bee venom, intentional self-harm.”

The new coding system also indicates whether the patient is being seen for the first time for an injury or whether there are ongoing complications stemming from an existing injury.

Top 20 Most Diagnosed Animal-Related ICD-10 Codes

Animal

ICD-10 Code Series

Total # Related Diagnoses

Related ICD-9 Code(s)

9895, 9091, V5889

E9063, E9068, E9295

E9060, E9068, E9295

Insect or other Arthropod, nonvenomous

Undetermined venomous animal

Fig 3 Not an exhaustive list of all animal- or insect-related ICD-10 codes. List only represents animal-related ICD-10 codes with quantifiable all-payer diagnoses in calendar year 2018. Does not include allergy diagnoses.

One example of the insight gleaned from ICD-10 codes is that, despite popular debate, cats are less dangerous than dogs—but more dangerous than some venomous invertebrates. Almost 5,000 people saw a physician for a cat-related injury compared to about 7,500 people for a dog-related injury. More accurate coding can help providers be more proactive in anticipating the care they will have to provide.

For now, only entities covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) are required to switch from ICD-9 to ICD-10 codes. However, though not necessary, organizations that are involved with insurance coverage and worker’s compensation could leverage the new codes to easily coordinate coverage and benefits. The ICD-10 coding system has been in use by WHO since 1990, and by countries internationally since 1994, though the U.S. only adopted it in late 2015. Currently ICD-11 is in development, and was tested throughout 2017. It is estimated that this coding system will come into effect in January 2022.

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Definitive Healthcare’s platform has the most up-to-date, comprehensive, and integrated data on the provider market and tracks procedures and diagnoses by ICD-9 code, CPT/HCPCS code, DRG, and ICD-10 codes in its Medical Procedures & Diagnosis Platform.

  • Examine all inpatient and outpatient procedures and diagnoses, broken down by DRG code
  • Identify procedures care providers conducted the most over a given year, the percentage of procedures belonging to specific category (surgical, obstetrics, etc.)
  • Look up the total number of payments for specific procedures and diagnoses
  • Look at the total amount of Medicare payments, average amount per claim, total Medicare charges, and other data.
  • Find readmission rates for diagnoses by DRG code as well as the average length of stay in days for patients readmitted for specific conditions
  • Look at the top reasons as to why patients were readmitted at specific hospitals
  • View this data through a historical lens, 2016, 2017, 2018, and 2019, to see how the market is shifting

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Icd 10 Code For Insect Bite Unspecified Area

Insect bites and stings — Wikipedia

ICD-9-CM Code 919.4 — Insect Bite, Nonvenomous, Of Other, Multiple .

Free, official information about 2012 (and also 2013-2015) icd 10 code for insect bite unspecified area code 914.5, including coding notes, detailed descriptions, index .

2017/18 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code S30.860A: Insect bite .

ICD-10 · T14.1, X23-X25, W57. icd 10 code for insect bite all over body and stings occur when an insect is agitated and seeks to defend itself through its .

2014 ICD-9-CM Diagnosis Code 919.4 : Insect bite, nonvenomous, of .

Multiple Insect Bites — AAPC

Help! I work in a dermatology clinic and have several questions about ICD10 coding for multiple 919.4 icd 10 code 919.4 .

ICD-10-CM Code S30.861 — Insect bite (nonvenomous) of abdominal .

S60.369A is a billable ICD code used to specify a icd 10 code for insect bite unspecified area ( nonvenomous) of unspecified thumb, initial encounter. A ‘billable code’ is detailed .

ICD 10 Code for Insect bite (nonvenomous) of upper arm S40.86

Free, official information about 2012 (and also 2013-2015) icd 10 insect bite leg, nonvenomous of shoulder and upper arm, without mention of infection.

2015 ICD-9-CM : 919.4 — Insect bite, nonvenomous, of other, multiple .

Learn ICD-10-CM coding as you go! Become familiar with the direct and approximation codes by seeing the replacement codes along with your icd 10 insect bite leg Code .

2014 ICD-9-CM Diagnosis Code 919.4 : Insect bite, nonvenomous, of .

2012 ICD-9-CM Diagnosis Code 919.5 : Insect bite, nonvenomous, of .

911.4 919.4 icd 10-CM Chapters, Sections & Parents.

ICD-9 Diagnosis Code 919.4 Insect bite NEC — ICD List

919.5 Insect bite, nonvenomous, of other, multiple, and unspecified .

To code a diagnosis of this type, you must use specify a 7th character that describes the icd 10 insect bite leg (nonvenomous) of abdominal wall’ in more detail.

2012 ICD-9-CM Diagnosis Code 914.5 : Insect bite, nonvenomous, of .

919.4 icd 10 to 180. Complexity of the codes will also .

ICD-10-CM Code S60.369A — Insect bite (nonvenomous) of .

ICD-10 — Modernizing Medicine

View 919.4 icd 10, nonvenomous, of other, multiple, and unspecified sites, without mention of infection.

910.4 INSECT BITE, NONVENOMOUS OF FACE, NECK, AND SCALP .

icd 10 code for insect bite arm, nonvenomous, of other, multiple, and unspecified sites, without mention of .

9194 ICD-9 Code | Insect bite NEC (Insect bite, nonvenomous, of other .

2015 ICD-9-CM : 919.5 — Insect bite, nonvenomous, of other, multiple .

2018 ICD-10 code for icd 10 insect bite leg code. You should code each .

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ICD-10-CM Code W57.XXXD

Bitten or stung by nonvenomous insect and other nonvenomous arthropods, subsequent encounter

  1. ICD-10-CM Index
  2. Chapter: V01–Y98
  3. Section: W50-W64
  4. Block: W57
  5. W57.XXXD — Bit/stung by nonvenom insect & oth nonvenom arthropods, subs

W57.XXXD is a billable code used to specify a medical diagnosis of bitten or stung by nonvenomous insect and other nonvenomous arthropods, subsequent encounter. The code is valid for the year 2020 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions. The ICD-10-CM code W57.XXXD might also be used to specify conditions or terms like allergic dermatitis due to bite of ctenocephalides canis, allergic reaction to animal, allergic reaction to bite and/or sting, allergic reaction to insect bite, animal bite of eye region, animal bite of mouth, etc The code is exempt from present on admission (POA) reporting for inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals.

The following clinical terms are approximate synonyms or lay terms that might be used to identify the correct diagnosis code:

  • Allergic dermatitis due to bite of Ctenocephalides canis
  • Allergic reaction to animal
  • Allergic reaction to bite and/or sting
  • Allergic reaction to insect bite
  • Animal bite of eye region
  • Animal bite of mouth
  • Arthropod dermatosis
  • Bite of animal flea
  • Bite of Anoplura species
  • Bite of arthropod
  • Bite of bed bug
  • Bite of body louse
  • Bite of Diptera species
  • Bite of gnat
  • Bite of Hemiptera species
  • Bite of horse-fly
  • Bite of human flea
  • Bite of insect
  • Bite of midge
  • Bite of mosquito
  • Bite of nonvenomous arthropod
  • Bite of nonvenomous insect
  • Bite of nonvenomous spider
  • Bite of pubic louse
  • Bite of reduviid bug
  • Bite of sandfly
  • Bite of spider
  • Bite of Syphonaptera species
  • Bite of thrip
  • Bite of tick
  • Bite of tsetse fly
  • Bite wound of mouth
  • Blackfly bite
  • Bullous insect bite reaction
  • Dermatosis due to Arachnida
  • Dermatosis due to beetle
  • Dermatosis due to flea
  • Dermatosis due to moth and/or butterfly
  • Dermatosis due to spider
  • Flea bites
  • Fly bite
  • Infection of tick bite
  • Insect bite of mouth
  • Insect bite reaction
  • Insect bite to cornea — nonvenomous
  • Insect bite to trunk — nonvenomous
  • Insect bite, nonvenomous, of face
  • Leech bite
  • Millipede burn
  • Mosquito bite
  • Nonvenomous insect bite
  • Nonvenomous insect bite of face without infection
  • Nonvenomous insect bite of lip without infection
  • Nonvenomous insect bite of multiple sites
  • Nonvenomous insect bite of multiple sites
  • Nonvenomous insect bite of multiple sites with infection
  • Nonvenomous insect bite of trunk with infection
  • Nonvenomous insect bite of trunk without infection
  • Nonvenomous insect bite with infection
  • Nonvenomous insect bite without infection
  • Sting by ant
  • Sting by bee
  • Sting by harvester ant
  • Sting by hornet
  • Sting by hymenoptera
  • Sting by insect
  • Sting by wasp
  • Superficial injuries involving multiple body regions
  • Superficial injuries involving multiple body regions
  • Superficial injury of cornea
  • Superficial injury of lip
  • Thrip bite
  • Tick bite
  • Tick bite
  • Tick bite
  • Tick bite without infection

W57.XXXD is exempt from POA reporting — The Present on Admission (POA) indicator is used for diagnosis codes included in claims involving inpatient admissions to general acute care hospitals. POA indicators must be reported to CMS on each claim to facilitate the grouping of diagnoses codes into the proper Diagnostic Related Groups (DRG). CMS publishes a listing of specific diagnosis codes that are exempt from the POA reporting requirement. Review other POA exempt codes here .

CMS POA Indicator Options and Definitions
ICD-10 Code Description Total # Diagnoses ICD-9 Code
Short Description: Bit/stung by nonvenom insect & oth nonvenom arthropods, subs
Long Description: Bitten or stung by nonvenomous insect and other nonvenomous arthropods, subsequent encounter
POA Indicator Code POA Reason for Code CMS will pay the CC/MCC DRG?
Y Diagnosis was present at time of inpatient admission. YES
N Diagnosis was not present at time of inpatient admission. NO
U Documentation insufficient to determine if the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission. NO
W Clinically undetermined — unable to clinically determine whether the condition was present at the time of inpatient admission. YES
1 Unreported/Not used — Exempt from POA reporting. NO
  • E906.4 — Nonvenom arthropod bite (Approximate Flag)
  • External causes of morbidity and mortality (V01–Y98)
    • Exposure to animate mechanical forces (W50-W64)
      • Bit/stung by nonvenom insect and oth nonvenomous arthropods (W57)
  • FY 2016 — New Code, effective from 10/1/2015 through 9/30/2016
    (First year ICD-10-CM implemented into the HIPAA code set)
  • FY 2017 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2016 through 9/30/2017
  • FY 2018 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2017 through 9/30/2018
  • FY 2019 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2018 through 9/30/2019
  • FY 2020 — No Change, effective from 10/1/2019 through 9/30/2020

Tools

  • Copy Code
  • Copy Description
  • View Related Codes
  • Convert W57.XXXD to ICD-9

Most insect bites are harmless, though they sometimes cause discomfort. Bee, wasp, and hornet stings and fire ant bites usually hurt. Mosquito and flea bites usually itch. Insects can also spread diseases. In the United States, some mosquitoes spread West Nile virus. Travelers outside the United States may be at risk for malaria and other infections.

To prevent insect bites and their complications

  • Don’t bother insects
  • Use insect repellant
  • Wear protective clothing
  • Be careful when you eat outside because food attracts insects
  • If you know you have severe allergic reactions to insect bites and stings (such as anaphylaxis), carry an emergency epinephrine kit
[Learn More]

Though many people are afraid of spiders, they rarely bite people unless threatened. Most spider bites are harmless. Occasionally, spider bites can cause allergic reactions. And bites by the venomous black widow and brown recluse spiders can be very dangerous to people.

If you are bitten by a spider, you may see a reaction similar to that of a bee sting, including redness, pain and swelling at the site. To treat a spider bite:

  • Wash the area well with soap and water
  • Apply an ice pack or a wet compress to the area
  • Take over-the-counter pain medicine, if needed
  • Consider using antihistamines for severe swelling
  • Seek medical treatment for small children and adults with severe symptoms

If you spend time outdoors or have pets that go outdoors, you need to beware of ticks. Ticks are small bloodsucking parasites. Many species transmit diseases to animals and people. Some of the diseases you can get from a tick bite are Lyme disease, ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever and tularemia.

Some ticks are so small that they can be difficult to see. Ticks may get on you if you walk through areas where they live, such as tall grass, leaf litter or shrubs.

Tick-borne diseases occur worldwide, including in your own backyard. To help protect yourself and your family, you should

  • Use a chemical repellent with DEET, permethrin or picaridin
  • Wear light-colored protective clothing
  • Tuck pant legs into socks
  • Avoid tick-infested areas
  • Check yourself, your children and your pets daily for ticks and carefully remove any ticks you find
[Learn More]

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See also:  Joint Statement on Mosquito Control in the United States, Mosquito Control, US EPA
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