Who were terman termites

Who were terman termites

Introduction,
It is amusing to note that much concentration on problem-solving,
have skewed our knowledge towards negative aspects of human
psychology than on positive. Most of subjects of psychological
studies were patients. Even Sigmund Freud generalized most of his
notions out of his studies on patients. There are exact sciences on
depression, stress and retarders. On contrary we have just broad
generalization about happiness and higher mental abilities. One of
the famous psychologists who studied natural giftedness was Lewis
Terman. Lewis Terman is also known as IQ Guru. Here I try to tell a
very brief story of a positive initiative that died out because of
negative beliefs,
The story of IQ test begins with the French psychologist, Alfred
Binet who introduced an intelligent test called Binet test for
identification of dull students that were in need of extra or special
help in their curriculum. Lewis Terman modified and standardized
Binet’s intelligence test for use in American schools. It was known
as Stanford-Binet test (Stanford, because Terman was chairing its
psychology department). Terman believed in an “elite ideology”….
the concept that intelligence is inherited like height, skin colors and
so on. Early identification of intelligent kids and grooming them
would provide the elite or future leaders to the nation. Terman
actually wanted to change the concept of then Americans that
believed in “Early ripe, early rot”. He wanted Americans appreciate
“gifted children” so he tried to show the gifts of gifted with a
missionary zeal.
Every nation is in dire need of leaders in all disciplines, at all times.
If heredity (genes) was proved to determine the future leaders and
successful people then it was such a powerful tool that could
change the face of human history. Naturally governments would
take interest in optimization of genetically gifted kids.

Termite Project,
Lewis Terman started a project to find gifted kids that later become
known as “Terman Kids” or “Termites”. He asked teachers of
elementary schools in Los Angeles, San Francisco and the East Bay,
to introduce their intelligent students. These intelligent students
were given IQ tests. The students with higher IQ levels were selected
for highest IQ tests. He selected a core group of 643 children with
IQs of 135 or higher.
By 1928, Terman had 1,528 termites between the ages of 3 and 28.
Most of termites were white from urban and middle class of
California. There were 856 termite boys and 672 termite girls. From
1,528 termites only two were African-Americans, six Japanese-
Americans and one American-Indian. If intelligence were genetic
then termites’ ratio were suggesting big differences of intelligence
between both sexes and between races. It was a time that “Eugenic”
had a lot of supporters in US.

What Happened to Termites,

After 35 years of following his termites, Lewis Terman summarized
the accomplishments of termites as follows,
“”Nearly 2000 scientific and technical papers and articles and
some 60 books and monographs in the sciences, literature, arts,
and humanities have been published. Patents granted amount to
at least 230. Other writings include 33 novels, about 375 short
stories, novelettes, and plays; 60 or more essays, critiques, and
sketches; and 265 miscellaneous articles on a variety of subjects.
The figures on publications do not include the hundreds of
publications by journalists that classify as news stories,
editorials, or newspaper columns, nor do they include the
hundreds, if not thousands, of radio, television, or motion picture
scripts.”
In words of Lewis Terman, the accomplishments of his termites
were impressive but others did not agree with him. In Greatness
Who Makes History and Why, Dean Simonton replied:
“Let us give Terman the benefit of the doubt and post that all 2,000
scientific and technical publications were produced by the 70 who
made it into American Men of Science. That implies that, on
average, Terman’s notable scientists produced about 29
publications by the time they had reached their mid-40s. In
contrast, American Nobel laureates in the sciences averaged about
38 publications by the time they were 39 years old, and claimed
about 59 publications by their mid-40s. THat amounts to a
twofold disparity in output. Hence, Terman’s intellectual elite was
not of the same caliber as the true scientific elite of the same
nation and era.”
It is not just that termite weren’t the same caliber as scientific elites but biggest blow came to termite concept by not having a single
Nobel Prize winner among them. William Shockley a Nobel Prize
winner in Physics was among elementary boys tested for termites.
He was not selected as a termite because his IQ level was not high
enough to be selected as termite.
Though the IQ termites are a forgotten story now but 80 years of
follow up in their lives are a big asset for science as it provides data
for studying human personality and effects of big events like that of
great depression and WWII on human psyche and attitudes.

Mitchell Leslie, “The vexing legacy of Lewis Terman” Stanford
magazine, 2000.

Simonton, D. (1994). Greatness: Who Makes History and Why. The
Guilford Press.

Terman, L. (1959). The Gifted Group at Mid-Life: Thirty-five Years
Follow-up of the Superior Child. Stanford University Press.

kd-knols.blogspot.com

Termite Mound

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Terman Termites

STATE OF THE TERMITE MARET – Pctonline.com
Ones — to get their take on the current state of the termite industry. terman. The $8000 first, -time homebuyers’ When termites were discovered they wanted to protect the new addition or the entire house, he . Return Document

The Creating Brain: The Neuroscience Of Genius
The Creating Brain: The Neuroscience of Genius, by Nancy C. Andreasen, M.D., Ph.D. Washington, D.C., ducted by Alfred Binet and Lewis Terman, study of “Terman geniuses” or “termites” (highly intelligent children followed from childhood to their adult years at Stan- . Retrieve Content

Florida Termites Study Guide – Hamzaproducts.com
Florida termites study guide, you only need to visit our website, which hosts a complete collection of ebooks. Lewis terman – wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Terman s study of genius and The study is still supported by Stanford University and will continue until . Content Retrieval

Www.mrbaerswebsite.com
Who were the “Termites”? 6. What did Terman expect to happen to his Termites? 7. What are some lasting impacts of the Termites experiment? Chapter 3, Part 3. 8. What is the catch in the relationship between success and IQ? 9. How is IQ like height in basketball? . Fetch Document

Gifted And Talented Programs – University Of Colorado Boulder
History of Gifted and Talented (GAT) in the U.S. Current move away from GAT. Important Events Alfred Binet’s test Terman’s Termites. Methods of Selection . Fetch Here

PowerPoint Presentation
Lewis Terman. A developer of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale in 1916, a revision of the Binet-Simon scale. Believed in the existence of innate differences in intelligence and supported the eugenics movement of his time. Lewis . Terman’s “Termites . Fetch Full Source

Lewis Terman – Wikipedia
Lewis Terman; Born: Lewis Madison Terman January 15, 1877 Johnson County, Indiana: Died: December 21, 1956 ) (aged The study is still supported by Stanford University and will continue until the last of the “Termites” withdraws from the study or dies. Role of complex tasks in developing . Read Article

[Page] Disease-Prone Personalities
The Human Termites “The psychologist Lewis Terman was one of the leading intelligence researchers in the twentieth century.” “Among other contributions, he developed the well-known Stanford-Binet IQ test.” . Retrieve Here

CHAPTER 12 May Actually Be Terribly – Springer
·Termites were slightly larger, ‘SOMEDAY WE MAY ACTUALLY BE TERRIBLY ALONE’ 229 Terman’s kids were wonderful students. Eighty-five per cent skipped grades at least once. Three-quarters of all their grades were As. Fifty per . View This Document

The Other IQ: Historiometric Assessments of Intelligence. Overview Lewis M. Terman: Begins longitudinal study of “Termites” (1921) . Document Retrieval

1 Vs 100 NBC Primetime Season 2 Episode With . – YouTube
Standard YouTube License; Loading Advertisement Autoplay When autoplay is enabled, a suggested video will automatically play next. Up next 1 vs 100 NBC Primetime First Show of the Series October 13th 2006 – Duration: 1:18:45. Karkit pipre . View Video

Outliers: The Story Of Success
Outliers: The Story of Success. By Malcolm Gladwell . Directions Who are the Termites? How did Lewis Terman act as a coach? “There is nothing about an individual as important as his IQ, except possibly his morals.” Terman . . Fetch This Document

2 – Bernardsville Middle School – Index
Gladwell points out that Terman’s Termites could be divided into three groups based upon their success . Read Full Source

Chapter 11 Make Two Lists Intelligence, Testing, And .
Intelligence, Testing, and Individual Differences Terman’s Termites – a group of gifted children to counter the idea of maladjustment in adulthood New versions of SAT that is better at predicting college success (now GPA and class rank are . Retrieve Doc

Chapter 8 Applied Psychology – Western Kentucky University
Chapter 8 Applied Psychology: The Legacy of Functionalism 1 1 Terman’s Termites World War I and Group Testing Robert Yerkes and the Army Alpha and Army Beta tests Allowed Terman to “bring psychology down from the clouds and . Get Doc

Outliers Group Chapter Presentation Discussion Suggestions
How did Lewis Terman act as a coach? “There is nothing about an individual as important as his IQ, except possibly his morals.” Terman. Comment on this statement. . Fetch Full Source

Gifted Education Programs And Procedures – Lp.wileypub.com
Publications about the Termites (Cox, 1926; Terman, 1925; Terman & Oden, 1947, 1957). The Termites were found to be well-adjusted, high-achieving adults. Gifted Education Programs and Procedures 391 manifestation of intelligence is very individual depending . View Document

Genetic Studies Of Genius – Wikipedia
The Genetic Studies of Genius, today known as the Terman Study of the Gifted, is currently the oldest and longest-running longitudinal study in the field of psychology. . Read Article

In Search Of The Creative Scientific Personality
Dr. Feist gave me the opportunity to develop myself as a researcher. His own Terman discovered that the ―Termites‖ (Terman‘s participants) were more likely than their peers to obtain better grades in school, receive higher educational . Visit Document

Evolution And Psychology – Southeastern Louisiana University
Evolution and Psychology. While evolutionary ideas in one form or another trace back to the ancient Greeks, Terman’s ‘termites.’ Studied over 1,000 gifted children for nearly 80 years. Contrary to widely held beliefs at the time, . View Doc

Lewis Terman Movie – YouTube
A brief review of Lewis Terman This feature is not available right now. Please try again later. . View Video

Termite (disambiguation) – Wikipedia
Termite (disambiguation) Look up Termite or termite in Wiktionary A termite is an insect. Termite may also refer to: Beatnik Termites, a Cleveland, Ohio power pop band; Termites from Mars A nickname for the participants in Lewis Terman’s study of gifted children; See also. Termit . Read Article

termitemoundgokoan.blogspot.com

The Truth About the “Termites”

What do the results of Lewis Terman’s famous study really demonstrate?

Posted Sep 09, 2009

His final group of “Termites” averaged a whopping IQ of 151. Following-up his group 35-years later, his gifted group at mid-life definitely seemed to conform to his expectations. They were taller, healthier, physically better developed, and socially adept (dispelling the myth at the time of high-IQ awkward nerds). As described in his 35-year followup, his group had an impressive array of accomplishments: Of just the gifted males (Terman’s initial group consisted of 857 males), 70 earned listings in American Men of Science, and 3 were elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Ten had entries in the Directory of American Scholars, and 31 appeared in Who’s Who in America. The list goes on. To drive in his point, Terman summarizes the accomplishments of his elite group as follow:

“Nearly 2000 scientific and technical papers and articles and some 60 books and monographs in the sciences, literature, arts, and humanities have been published. Patents granted amount to at least 230. Other writings include 33 novels, about 375 short stories, novelettes, and plays; 60 or more essays, critiques, and sketches; and 265 miscellaneous articles on a variety of subjects. The figures on publications do not include the hundreds of publications by journalists that classify as news stories, editorials, or newspaper columns, nor do they include the hundreds, if not thousands, of radio, television, or motion picture scripts.”

Is this impressive? Certainly. Is there more to this story than meets the eye? Absolutely. William Shockley was among the elementary school children tested by Terman’s researchers in the 20s. His IQ was not high enough to be a “Termite”, so he was shut out of the experiment and was not deemed “gifted”. Undismayed, Shockley went to Harvard and got a Ph.D. He joined Bell Telephone Laboratories, and helped devised the point-contact transistor in 1947 and the junction transistor in 1948. This latter accomplishment earned him the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1970. Later as a professor, as he dusted his prize in his office at Stanford University, he looked at the list of accomplishments by the “Termites” and realized that not one of them held the trophy that was now in his possession.

A lot of people know about Terman’s study, but don’t know the truth about it. It was recently estimated that while the list of accomplishments by the Termites was undoubtedly impressive, they did not come close in caliber to the true scientific elite of the same nation and era. In Greatness: Who Makes History and Why, Dean Simonton explains:

“Let us give Terman the benefit of the doubt and post that all 2,000 scientific and technical publications were produced by the 70 who made it into American Men of Science. That implies that, on average, Terman’s notable scientists produced about 29 publications by the time they had reached their mid-40s. In contrast, American Nobel laureates in the sciences averaged about 38 publications by the time they were 39 years old, and claimed about 59 publications by their mid-40s. THat amounts to a twofold disparity in output. Hence, Terman’s intellectual elite was not of the same caliber as the true scientific elite of the same nation and era.”

Another analysis shows that the accomplishments of the “Termites” could have been predicted on their socioeconomic status alone. These were mostly white, middle to upper middle class men with opportunities and resources for success. Some argue that it wasn’t even necessary for Terman to analyze the IQ dimension–he could have stopped with SES and call it a day.

It’s also noteworthy that very few minorities were in his sample (to be precise, he included 4 Japanese students, 1 black child, 1 Indian child, and 1 Mexican child in a total sample of 168,000), and teachers at the time (I would hope things are better today) undoubtedly had a bias toward identifying white students with talent. Which means many qualified students weren’t even given the chance to take Terman’s test. Terman did note that certain minority groups, in particular the Italian, Portogeuse, and Mexican in California at the time tended to have low IQs. But as to the cause, Terman had this to say:

“How much of this inferiority is due to the language handicap and to other environmental factors it is impossible to say, but the relative good showing made by certain other immigrant groups similarly handicapped would suggest that the true causes lie deeper than environment.”

I’ll leave it to you to surmise what he meant by “deeper” in this context.

Even more telling is a recent study conducted by Margaret Kern and Howard Friedman at the University of California at Riverside. They gathered follow-up data from the Terman Life Cycle Study, which included 1,023 participants. They wanted to know how predictive age at first reading and age at school entry was. What they found blew my mind. While early reading was associated with academic success, it was less associated with lifelong educational attainment and was hardly related to midlife adjustment at all. Early school entry was associated with less educational attainment, worse midlife adjustment, and even an increased mortality risk! The authors conclude: “The findings also highlight the complex issues regarding school entry and readiness. Lifespan approaches to these multifaceted issues will help us better understand the full ramifications of these important early-life developmental milestones.”

Terman’s thinking about giftedness has had a profound effect on gifted education in the United States and continues to have an impact. While I certainly think he’s done a lot of good for the field of gifted education, I also think his work deserves some reflection since so much is at stake for so many children.

© 2009 Scott Barry Kaufman, All Rights Reserved

References

Terman, L. (1925, 1947, 1959). Genetic Studies of Genius.

Terman, L. (1959). The Gifted Group at Mid-Life: Thirty-five Years Follow-up of the Superior Child. Stanford University Press.

Kern, M.L., & Friedman, H.S. (2008). Early educational milestones as predictors of lifelong academic achievement, midlife adjustment, and longevity. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 30, 419-430.

Simonton, D. (1994). Greatness: Who Makes History and Why. The Guilford Press.

What’s considered a strong correlation the social sciences?

How stongly does IQ correlate with numerous positive life outcomes?

My IQ vewy good.

My IQ vewy good.

The Half-Truth About The “Termites”

There are many problems with Kaufman’s assessment of Terman and his landmark study of the gifted, far more than I have the time or the patience to elaborate in detail. Those who seek a more sophisticated and informative critical assessment of the study should visit the following links:

1. Terman Summary: http://hiqnews.megafoundation.org/Terman_Summary.htm

2. The Termites Grow Tall: http://hiqnews.megafoundation.org/2002-6-15_Intelligence.htm .

I will simply add the following observations.

First, the allegation that the Termites’ achievements could have been as easily predicted by the participants’ SES, without reference to IQ, seems glib and very much open to question.

In particular, the issue is not whether Terman caught every budding scientific genius in his sample (cf. below); it is whether the Nobel laureates against which the Termites are unfavorably compared had IQs comparable to the Termites’, and the extent to which high IQ correlates with high achievement in the sciences (see also Ann Roe’s book The Making of a Scientist, which offers strong evidence of such a correlation). If so, then their omission from Terman’s study was was nothing more than an accident of geography.

Of course, there will also obviously be some individuals, such as Shockley (or, later, Richard Feynman) whose IQs–as measured on that day, at least–do not equal their aptitude. No one, least of all Terman, and especially later in his study, claims that IQ correlates perfectly with achievement or “genius”, or that IQ tests are perfectly reliable instruments.

Second, much seems to made of the fact that so few great geniuses emerged from a group of 1,500-plus individuals sifted from a California population of 260,000. As the author of one of the comments linked above mentions, commonsensically, how many “geniuses” would one expect to find in a population the size of the city of Fort Lauderdale? Granted, Terman set himself up for criticism by using the term “genius”, but that fact does not mean that he expected all of his Termites to be future Newtons and Shakespeares.

Finally, let’s consider the career of Hollywood filmmaker Edward Dmytryk. He was nominated for a Best Director Oscar, and he directed such classics as The Caine Mutiny. He was also a Termite. That he achieved a high degree of professional eminence in his field is indisputable (of course, I realize that only scientific eminence is important, and should count for anything–insert “sarcasticon” here). So, here is evidence of at least one very eminent achiever out of 1,500-plus–not bad. I’ll bet there are a few more, if one bothers to look for them, and particularly outside the sciences, in which high achievement is more easily quantified, and, in our culture, more highly regarded.

Further, when Dmytryk was a child, Terman was responsible for rescuing him from an abusive home. So, while we are tut-tutting at Terman for his evil and unenlightened views–at least compared to those of us in the present generation, who are, of course, perfect and perfectly enlightened in every way–let’s remember what Terman did for Dmytryk, at the least.

The Half-Truth About The “Termites”

There are many problems with Kaufman’s assessment of Terman and his landmark study of the gifted, far more than I have the time or the patience to elaborate in detail. Those who seek a more sophisticated and informative critical assessment of the study should visit the following links:

1. Terman Summary: http://hiqnews.megafoundation.org/Terman_Summary.htm

2. The Termites Grow Tall: http://hiqnews.megafoundation.org/2002-6-15_Intelligence.htm .

I will simply add the following observations.

First, the allegation that the Termites’ achievements could have been as easily predicted by the participants’ SES, without reference to IQ, seems glib and very much open to question.

In particular, the issue is not whether Terman caught every budding scientific genius in his sample (cf. below); it is whether the Nobel laureates against which the Termites are unfavorably compared had IQs comparable to the Termites’, and the extent to which high IQ correlates with high achievement in the sciences (see also Ann Roe’s book The Making of a Scientist, which offers strong evidence of such a correlation). If so, then their omission from Terman’s study was was nothing more than an accident of geography.

Of course, there will also obviously be some individuals, such as Shockley (or, later, Richard Feynman) whose IQs–as measured on that day, at least–do not equal their aptitude. No one, least of all Terman, and especially later in his study, claims that IQ correlates perfectly with achievement or “genius”, or that IQ tests are perfectly reliable instruments.

Second, much seems to made of the fact that so few great geniuses emerged from a group of 1,500-plus individuals sifted from a California population of 260,000. As the author of one of the comments linked above mentions, commonsensically, how many “geniuses” would one expect to find in a population the size of the city of Fort Lauderdale? Granted, Terman set himself up for criticism by using the term “genius”, but that fact does not mean that he expected all of his Termites to be future Newtons and Shakespeares.

Finally, let’s consider the career of Hollywood filmmaker Edward Dmytryk. He was nominated for a Best Director Oscar, and he directed such classics as The Caine Mutiny. He was also a Termite. That he achieved a high degree of professional eminence in his field is indisputable (of course, I realize that only scientific eminence is important, and should count for anything–insert “sarcasticon” here). So, here is evidence of at least one very eminent achiever out of 1,500-plus–not bad. I’ll bet there are a few more, if one bothers to look for them, and particularly outside the sciences, in which high achievement is more easily quantified, and, in our culture, more highly regarded.

Further, when Dmytryk was a child, Terman was responsible for rescuing him from an abusive home. So, while we are tut-tutting at Terman for his evil and unenlightened views–at least compared to those of us in the present generation, who are, of course, perfect and perfectly enlightened in every way–let’s remember what Terman did for Dmytryk, at the least.

The Half-Truth About The “Termites”

There are many problems with Kaufman’s assessment of Terman and his landmark study of the gifted, far more than I have the time or the patience to elaborate in detail. Those who seek a more sophisticated and informative critical assessment of the study should visit the following links:

1. Terman Summary: http://hiqnews.megafoundation.org/Terman_Summary.htm

2. The Termites Grow Tall: http://hiqnews.megafoundation.org/2002-6-15_Intelligence.htm .

I will simply add the following observations.

First, the allegation that the Termites’ achievements could have been as easily predicted by the participants’ SES, without reference to IQ, seems glib and very much open to question.

In particular, the issue is not whether Terman caught every budding scientific genius in his sample (cf. below); it is whether the Nobel laureates against which the Termites are unfavorably compared had IQs comparable to the Termites’, and the extent to which high IQ correlates with high achievement in the sciences (see also Ann Roe’s book The Making of a Scientist, which offers strong evidence of such a correlation). If so, then their omission from Terman’s study was was nothing more than an accident of geography.

Of course, there will also obviously be some individuals, such as Shockley (or, later, Richard Feynman) whose IQs–as measured on that day, at least–do not equal their aptitude. No one, least of all Terman, and especially later in his study, claims that IQ correlates perfectly with achievement or “genius”, or that IQ tests are perfectly reliable instruments.

Second, much seems to made of the fact that so few great geniuses emerged from a group of 1,500-plus individuals sifted from a California population of 260,000. As the author of one of the comments linked above mentions, commonsensically, how many “geniuses” would one expect to find in a population the size of the city of Fort Lauderdale? Granted, Terman set himself up for criticism by using the term “genius”, but that fact does not mean that he expected all of his Termites to be future Newtons and Shakespeares.

Finally, let’s consider the career of Hollywood filmmaker Edward Dmytryk. He was nominated for a Best Director Oscar, and he directed such classics as The Caine Mutiny. He was also a Termite. That he achieved a high degree of professional eminence in his field is indisputable (of course, I realize that only scientific eminence is important, and should count for anything–insert “sarcasticon” here). So, here is evidence of at least one very eminent achiever out of 1,500-plus–not bad. I’ll bet there are a few more, if one bothers to look for them, and particularly outside the sciences, in which high achievement is more easily quantified, and, in our culture, more highly regarded.

Further, when Dmytryk was a child, Terman was responsible for rescuing him from an abusive home. So, while we are tut-tutting at Terman for his evil and unenlightened views–at least compared to those of us in the present generation, who are, of course, perfect and perfectly enlightened in every way–let’s remember what Terman did for Dmytryk, at the least.

The Half-Truth ABout The “Termites”

There are many problems with Kaufman’s assessment of Terman and his landmark study of the gifted, far more than I have the time or the patience to elaborate in detail. Those who seek a more sophisticated and informative critical assessment of the study should visit the following links:

1. Terman Summary: http://hiqnews.megafoundation.org/Terman_Summary.htm

2. The Termites Grow Tall: http://hiqnews.megafoundation.org/2002-6-15_Intelligence.htm .

I will simply add the following observations.

First, the allegation that the Termites’ achievements could have been as easily predicted by the participants’ SES, without reference to IQ, seems glib and very much open to question.

In particular, the issue is not whether Terman caught every budding scientific genius in his sample (cf. below); it is whether the Nobel laureates against which the Termites are unfavorably compared had IQs comparable to the Termites’, and the extent to which high IQ correlates with high achievement in the sciences (see also Ann Roe’s book The Making of a Scientist, which offers strong evidence of such a correlation). If so, then their omission from Terman’s study was was nothing more than an accident of geography.

Of course, there will also obviously be some individuals, such as Shockley (or, later, Richard Feynman) whose IQs–as measured on that day, at least–do not equal their aptitude. No one, least of all Terman, and especially later in his study, claims that IQ correlates perfectly with achievement or “genius”, or that IQ tests are perfectly reliable instruments.

Second, much seems to made of the fact that so few great geniuses emerged from a group of 1,500-plus individuals sifted from a California population of 260,000. As the author of one of the comments linked above mentions, commonsensically, how many “geniuses” would one expect to find in a population the size of the city of Fort Lauderdale? Granted, Terman set himself up for criticism by using the term “genius”, but that fact does not mean that he expected all of his Termites to be future Newtons and Shakespeares.

Finally, let’s consider the career of Hollywood filmmaker Edward Dmytryk. He was nominated for a Best Director Oscar, and he directed such classics as The Caine Mutiny. He was also a Termite. That he achieved a high degree of professional eminence in his field is indisputable (of course, I realize that only scientific eminence is important, and should count for anything–insert “sarcasticon” here). So, here is evidence of at least one very eminent achiever out of 1,500-plus–not bad. I’ll bet there are a few more, if one bothers to look for them, and particularly outside the sciences, in which high achievement is more easily quantified, and, in our culture, more highly regarded.

Further, when Dmytryk was a child, Terman was responsible for rescuing him from an abusive home. So, while we are tut-tutting at Terman for his evil and unenlightened views–at least compared to those of us in the present generation, who are, of course, perfect and perfectly enlightened in every way–let’s remember what Terman did for Dmytryk, at the least.

women never mentioned

I know a woman who was a termite so I know there were some females yet women and girls are never mentioned in this article.
I am used to this but it is still very annoying and interesting that an old scientist includes them and an young or new one leaves them out.
Nothing new here.

iq above 135

baby boomer that fell through the crack, absolute bumm, extreme bi polar also enjoy my friends, i got perpetual and pzyo-electric givin out a steady amp of 8

www.psychologytoday.com

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