Termites victoria

Termites victoria

Commonly found throughout Victoria – particularly in urban areas or where eucalypt gum trees are highly prevalent.

Nest Location – Coptotermes acinaciformis are a very secretive termite species; they build their nest out of sight, often within the base of eucalyptus or other susceptible trees, or completely under the ground; often within an enclosed patio or under concrete (on ground) flooring which is ideal for moisture retention, temperature and humidity control within the termite colony nest. This species often build subsidiary nests away from the main colony nest. A subsidiary nest can be contained in a wall cavity of a building where there is a reliable moisture source, for example, from a leaking shower recess or faulty guttering or rusted down pipes.

Destructive Nature – Coptotermes acinaciformis are highly destructive to buildings and other timber structures. They are the most w > Coptotermes frenchi

Commonly found throughout Victoria; the most prevalent destructive termite species in the Gippsland and other regions where eucalypt gum trees are present. They are highly active in Melbourne and other urban areas in Victoria, where buildings are constructed of softwood or oregon timber framing.

Nest Location – Coptotermes frenchi most often build their nest in the root crown or lower trunk area of living trees, particularly eucalypts. They may also build their nest as a mound in the dryer areas of Victoria.

Destructive Nature – Coptotermes frenchi can cause severe damage to buildings and other wooden structures. It is common for this species to devour timber framing leaving only a thin veneer. This species is the most shy of the destructive species; they will retreat from a location immediately (for the time being) if disturbed. Requires expert knowledge and a sensitive touch to gain effective control. Nasutitermes exitiosus

Commonly found throughout Victoria – particularly in urban areas or where eucalypt gum trees are highly prevalent.

Nest Location – Nasutitermes exitiosus build a mound nest which protrudes 30cm to 75cm above the ground. Control can be as easy as knocking the top off the nest and a follow up insecticide treatment inside the nest.

Destructive Nature – Nasutitermes exitiosus are destructive to buildings and other timber structures. Sometimes severe damage may occur, but not so commonly as the other species listed above. Coptotermes lacteus

Commonly found in eastern Victoria – particularly prevalent in Melbourne, Gippsland and Albury-Wodonga regions.

Nest Location – this termite species, most often builds it’s nest as a mound up to 2m above ground level, with hard clay walls, so control is easily effected once located by knocking the top off and insecticide treatment of the nest.

Destructive Nature – Coptotermes lacteus attacks stumps, dead trees, timber fences, poles and other timber structures that are in contact with the soil, being softened by weathering or decay. These termites are also known to attack such timber in damp sub-floor areas. Heterotermes ferox

Commonly found throughout Victoria – particularly in urban areas or where eucalypt gum trees are highly prevalent.

Nest Location – Heterotermes ferox often build their colony nest next to stumps, logs, or other timber in direct contact with the soil where some wood decay or rotting is prevalent.

Destructive Nature – Heterotermes ferox are be destructive to damp timbers and are usually found attacking fences, poles and other timber structures subject to wood decay from weathering or from being in contact with the soil. This species is often confused with the more aggressive and destructive Coptotermes acinaciformis species. Correct > Dampwood termites – form small independent nests which often attack sick or dead trees, decaying stumps or mouldy timber in the ground; they are seldom found in dry timbers in buildings.

If You find termites do NOT disturb them

CONSUMER NOTE: certain termite species if left uncontrolled can cause a severe amount of damage to a building in a short amount of time. If you find termites in or around your property, it is essential that you do NOT disturb them and promptly contact your local termite specialist for and inspection of the property and advice on the protective measures available.

Subterranean Termites.
Mother Nature’s most prolific builders
This picture shows a large above ground termite nest found in the Northern Territory of Australia. In cooler climates, most of the destructive termite species build their nest completely below ground level.

A large colony in an urban environment is most often unseen, being totally below ground level with a nest containing more than a million termites – secretly eating the inside of your timbers leaving you an empty shell.

www.termite.com

Pacific Dampwood Termite – As their name suggests, these insects will only inhabit damp or rotting wood. These insects will commonly infest rotting logs, fence posts, deck posts, and garden ties. They will also infest homes if there has been severe moisture issues, or prolonged wood to soil contact. Chemical treatment for this pest is rarely required. Simple removal of affected wood and replacement with new dry timbers will eradicate this pest. Correction of the moisture issue will prevent these termites from reoccurring. Our company can apply a residual treatment to new timbers to help protect against reinfestation.

Subterranean Termites – This insect is less common in our region, but is far more destructive. These insects will live in the ground beneath your home. They will then emerge through a crack in the foundation and begin to feed on the sill plates of your home. If left untreated, they will then work their way up into the studs of your house. These termites need to be treated by a professional pest management company.

Contact Us or call us at 250-920-6267 for a free estimate.

How do I know if I have Subterranean Termites?

The first sign of the presence of this pest is their mud tubes. These insects only travel through these tubes. You will commonly find these mud tubes on the ground level or crawlspace area of your home. They are commonly found around the hot water tank or next to the baseboards in the ground level of the home. These tubes are made of granular dirt and or sand. When you disturb these tubes you may be able to see opaque white grubs, these are the worker termites. Another sign that these insects are infesting your home is the presence of flying reproductives. The reproductives are quite small and black with wings that are twice as long as the body. They resemble small flies and are commonly mistaken for flying ants. If you suspect you have these insects call our company for a free estimate.

Treatment for this pest is quite involved, and requires drilling and injection beneath the slab of your home.


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Hungry termites marching on Melbourne with homeowners warned it ‘could get ugly’

By Angus Smith and Nadia Dimattina

First came the clouds of mosquitoes, then the swarms of flies and now insect experts are warning that teams of termites could be hard at work in homes across Melbourne.

Thanks to a series of ideal weather events, termites are currently “having a ball” said Dr Don Ewart, an entomologist who teaches pest management at Melbourne Polytechnic.

According to Dr Ewart, the same weather conditions that have made the environment right for the recent mozzie and fly explosion are also perfect conditions for termite breeding and exploring.

“They have had a good, wet spring and we are getting this moisture, and they are still quite actively exploring,” he said.

The wet spring has created ideal conditions for termites to spread. Credit: Michael Pettigrew

“The pest managers who do specialist termite work are all run off their feet.”

Dr Ewart says it is shaping up to be a particularly bad summer. In fact it might already be bad but we have not yet noticed.

“Generally the soil moisture is high, that makes a big difference to termites. Termites are really just organised cockroaches,” he said.

“They like to go tunnelling and so it is much easier for them to find a place to attack … their attacks [often] go for several weeks or several months before anybody notices.”

Termite wings are a sure sign that your home has been infested.

Termites are attracted by moisture and dampness, so anything involving water can be a hazard for homeowners.

Termites always need a drink, Dr Ewart says, “and if the food is close to the water source then life is really good. Otherwise they have to keep carrying water with them and that means they explore less.”

A Canberra pest controller was fined for failing to provide two homeowners with a termite certificate, meaning they could not live in their homes.

Suburbs including Williamstown, South Melbourne and Footscray “are getting lots of attacks at this time of year”, Dr Ewart says – but new suburbs are no safer than older ones.

“New suburbs will have a few attacks and then they get about 10 years old and tend to have a whole lot more,” he said.

Termites can damage any timber parts of a house.

Matthew Lynn first realised the termites had invaded his home in Melbourne’s north when he noticed thousands of tiny wings.

“The exterminator confirmed they were definitely termite wings but we couldn’t find any evidence of an infestation so he went around and tapped the whole house with a golf ball on a stick and searched through and through and then gave me the all clear,” he said.

A householder takes drastic action to combat a termite infestation.

Forty-five minutes after the exterminator left, a termite buried its head through the floorboards in his hallway.

Mr Lynn ripped up the floor and found all the floorboards had been turned into dust and his living room had “been eaten out as well … it was quite a substantial infestation”.

He says that finding a termite infestation is similar to finding you have an STD in that, “you have to go round and tell all your neighbours”.

Mr Lynn said having a house full of termites can happen to anyone.

“I don’t live anywhere near a waterway; I live in the inner city so I didn’t expect it. It could happen anywhere,” he said.

He advises homeowners to be cautious of termites this summer.

“Keep an eye out for those wings”, he said.

Dr Ewart believes there is no silver bullet with termite control and it can sometimes “get ugly”. Keeping termites out, he says, can be “really complicated”.

The only thing you can really do is get the place inspected by someone who knows what they are doing and get their advice,” he said.

Tips for dealing with termites

Dr Ewart says the warning signs of a termite infestation include:

  • Lots of discarded wings from swarmers inside the house
  • When the vacuum cleaner leaves a dent in the skirting board
  • Strange bits of mud in plasterwork
  • Any cracked or bubbling paint

What to do if you have termites:

  • Don’t try and get rid of them yourself – if they are disturbed they will move to another place in the house
  • Call a pest control professional and get them to come and inspect your house immediately

www.theage.com.au

Termites victoria

Commonly found throughout Victoria – particularly in urban areas or where eucalypt gum trees are highly prevalent.

Nest Location – Coptotermes acinaciformis are a very secretive termite species; they build their nest out of sight, often within the base of eucalyptus or other susceptible trees, or completely under the ground; often within an enclosed patio or under concrete (on ground) flooring which is ideal for moisture retention, temperature and humidity control within the termite colony nest. This species often build subsidiary nests away from the main colony nest. A subsidiary nest can be contained in a wall cavity of a building where there is a reliable moisture source, for example, from a leaking shower recess or faulty guttering or rusted down pipes.

Destructive Nature – Coptotermes acinaciformis are highly destructive to buildings and other timber structures. They are the most w > Coptotermes frenchi

Commonly found throughout Victoria ; the most prevalent destructive termite species in the Gippsland and other regions where eucalypt gum trees are present. They are highly active in Melbourne and other urban areas in Victoria, where buildings are constructed of softwood or oregon timber framing.

Nest Location – Coptotermes frenchi most often build their nest in the root crown or lower trunk area of living trees, particularly eucalypts. They may also build their nest as a mound in the dryer areas of Victoria.

Destructive Nature – Coptotermes frenchi can cause severe damage to buildings and other wooden structures. It is common for this species to devour timber framing leaving only a thin veneer. This species is the most shy of the destructive species; they will retreat from a location immediately (for the time being) if disturbed. Requires expert knowledge and a sensitive touch to gain effective control. Nasutitermes exitiosus

Commonly found throughout Victoria – particularly in urban areas or where eucalypt gum trees are highly prevalent.

Nest Location – Nasutitermes exitiosus build a mound nest which protrudes 30cm to 75cm above the ground. Control can be as easy as knocking the top off the nest and a follow up insecticide treatment inside the nest.

Destructive Nature – Nasutitermes exitiosus are destructive to buildings and other timber structures. Sometimes severe damage may occur, but not so commonly as the other species listed above. Coptotermes lacteus

Commonly found in eastern Victoria – particularly prevalent in Melbourne, Gippsland and Albury-Wodonga regions.

Nest Location – this termite species, most often builds it’s nest as a mound up to 2m above ground level, with hard clay walls, so control is easily effected once located by knocking the top off and insecticide treatment of the nest.

Destructive Nature – Coptotermes lacteus attacks stumps, dead trees, timber fences, poles and other timber structures that are in contact with the soil, being softened by weathering or decay. These termites are also known to attack such timber in damp sub-floor areas. Heterotermes ferox

Commonly found throughout Victoria – particularly in urban areas or where eucalypt gum trees are highly prevalent.

Nest Location – Heterotermes ferox often build their colony nest next to stumps, logs, or other timber in direct contact with the soil where some wood decay or rotting is prevalent.

Destructive Nature – Heterotermes ferox are be destructive to damp timbers and are usually found attacking fences, poles and other timber structures subject to wood decay from weathering or from being in contact with the soil. This species is often confused with the more aggressive and destructive Coptotermes acinaciformis species. Correct > Dampwood termites – form small independent nests which often attack sick or dead trees, decaying stumps or mouldy timber in the ground; they are seldom found in dry timbers in buildings.

If You find termites do NOT disturb them

CONSUMER NOTE: certain termite species if left uncontrolled can cause a severe amount of damage to a building in a short amount of time. If you find termites in or around your property, it is essential that you do NOT disturb them and promptly contact your local termite specialist for and inspection of the property and advice on the protective measures available.

Subterranean Termites .
Mother Nature’s most prolific builders
This picture shows a large above ground termite nest found in the Northern Territory of Australia. In cooler climates, most of the destructive termite species build their nest completely below ground level.

A large colony in an urban environment is most often unseen, being totally below ground level with a nest containing more than a million termites – secretly eating the inside of your timbers leaving you an empty shell.

www.termite.com.au

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Concealed in locations that often go undetected, termites destroy timber internally, leaving only a wafer-thin layer to protect them from the outside environment.

There is no predictable pattern or height restriction to their damage, with termite-infested sites found in roofs and even high-rise construction.

All new houses, including extensions, built within areas designated by municipal councils to be subjected to termite infestation, must have some form of management against termite attack.

This is a requirement of the Building Regulations 2018 (the Regulations) and means the construction of all new buildings and additions are required to be protected against termite infestation in accordance with Australian Standard AS3660.1 – 2000 Termite management – Part 1: New Building work. The only exceptions apply to detached Class 10 buildings, such as a shed, garage or carport.

Termite management

Termite management involves reducing the chances of major damage caused to your house by termite infestations.

Termites cause more damage to Australian houses than fire, floods and storms combined – and it is damage not covered by household insurance.

The Regulations require all new buildings, including alterations and extensions, built within designated termite-infested areas to have some form of management against termite attack.

The National Construction Code Volumes One & Two provide two alternative strategies for termite management:

  • the use of termite resistant materials for the primary structural elements
  • the installation of a chemical or physical barrier system.

Who declares an area termite infested?

Local councils may declare areas within their municipality that are likely to be subject to infestation by termites.

Consult your local council to determine whether the area in which you are planning to build has been declared subject to termite infestation.

How can termites be managed?

At design stage

If you are building a new home or major extension, you can choose to use termite resistant primary structures like concrete slabs, termite resistant timber and steel frames.

By doing this you limit the potential for termite damage to secondary and superficial elements which are easier to detect and cheaper to replace.

This option may reduce future ongoing costs and uses conventional materials and construction methods and does not rely on a regular maintenance system or professional liability policy.

Alternatively you can specify a physical or chemical barrier to be installed during construction. This should be in accordance with the Australian Standard (AS3660.1) and should be finalised during the designs stage.

Some barriers will require ongoing inspections, maintenance and/or chemical replenishment.

During building construction

The risk of attack can be reduced if effort is made to remove tree stumps, roots, off-cuts and to properly consolidate the soil to minimise cracks in concrete slabs.

Concrete is a very effective termite barrier if it is correctly designed and constructed on properly prepared ground.

Termites eat any cellulose material which besides wood, can even include electrical cabling, plastics and other composite building materials. While this does not include concrete, cracks as small as 1.5mm may allow termites to find their way into a cavity such as walls and beneath floors.

When buying a house

It is strongly recommended that before you buy a house, you have an expert inspect it for termite activity.

The cost of a full report pales against the potential expense of repairs.

Ensure you engage a properly qualified, experienced and insured pest inspector and ask them to report on the type, age and condition of any termite management system which may be installed, and on the materials used for critical structural elements.

Long-term management

Long-term management can be gained through the application of chemical or physical barriers (or both) to prevent termites from penetrating the structure. An Australian Standard (AS3660.1) has been written on the subject.

The aim is to keep any cellulose material, especially timber, away from soil contact and to encourage termites to build a mud tube out in the open where it can be seen during a regular, careful inspection. Termite management systems are designed to stop concealed access and force termites into the open where their mud tunnels can be more easily detected.

Physical barriers range from small graded stone particles, stainless steel mesh and chemically impregnated composite products. Termite resistant materials are designed to protect the critical concealed structural elements of your home, while ensuring a ‘small target’ for any termite activity.

Ensure you use a product that has been certified and complies with the Australian Standard and, most importantly, you must arrange for appropriately qualified operators to carry out regular inspections.

You should also be fully informed about ongoing maintenance requirements and the best pre- or post-construction options.

How do I identify termite activity?

Termite activity is often difficult to detect as it usually occurs in concealed areas.

Regular visual inspections in and around your home are recommended to identify any potential termite activity. Things to look for include:

  • weak timber that breaks easily revealing wafer thin layers – skirting boards are often the first point of damage
  • changes in corner fascia under gutters, as termites are attracted to damp or moist areas
  • mud-like tubes or material around external footings/brickwork, or internal fittings like service pipes and electrical plugs
  • cracks/holes in timber or plaster with a fine dust residue.
  • surrounding trees, wood piles and garden beds (up to a 50 metres radius around the home) to identify if a colony is active nearby.

If you suspect any termite activity you should engage an expert to conduct a full inspection.

What should I do if I find termites?

Should you uncover termites, try to put things back as they were.

Surface spraying and ripping out floorboards, architraves or other building material may kill a few termites in those timbers but in doing so you have lessened the chances of an expert effectively treating the main nest. The termites will re-group and probably choose to attack another section of the house structure.

Depending on preferences and construction, an approved pest controller can assist with the best type of treatment, which besides chemical spray options, may include reticulation and/or baiting systems.

Termites regularly re-infest with multiple nests attached to the colony at a radius of 50-plus metres. This, together with the fact that a termite colony can consist of over two and a half million individuals, means that if you do discover an infestation, it is prudent and civically responsible to immediately notify your neighbours and local council.

Termite Tips

The following tips can help you avoid termite damage:

  • Choose a termite management system to suit your preferences and needs for the type of construction.
  • Understand the system of termite management and maintenance requirements for your house.
  • Check your property and building regularly for termite activity to reduce the risk of damage.
  • Have a pest controller inspect the house every 12 months, especially if you are in a high hazard area. Expert inspection should also be done before purchasing a property with a termite free statutory declaration provided by the vendor.
  • If you are concerned about existing or potential infestation, contact your local pest control management company.
  • Plumbing leaks, drainage problems and roof leaks should be addressed promptly, as termites are attracted to damp conditions.
  • Garden beds and mulching should not be built up against walls, as this allows termites an undetectable entry point to the building.
  • Do not block or cover sub-floor ventilation with garden beds, mulching or paving.
  • Do not stack materials against walls, as this can allow termites to enter without early detection.
  • Sub-floor areas should be well ventilated – ensure vents are not obstructed.
  • Storage of cellulose products in the sub-floor space should be avoided.
  • Use termite-resistant timber for works around the property, including retaining walls.
  • Use metal stirrups for verandas and gateposts.
  • Regularly clean and check timber decks.

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