Termites in Mobile Homes

Termites in Mobile Homes

Every year termites attack thousands of homes and buildings. American homeowners spend millions of dollars annually to treat termites and repair the damage that they cause.

Many people who own mobile homes have the impression that termites cannot attack their home. Some of them think that the steel framework makes the home impervious to termites. Others think that since the home is elevated, termites cannot invade it. In fact, termites attack hundreds of mobile homes every year. Subterranean termites attack mobile homes in every part of the country. In some areas, drywood termites also attack mobile homes.

Subterranean termites live in colonies in the ground. They eat cellulose, so they attack anything made of wood, cardboard, and paper. They travel inside dirt tunnels to reach a food source that is above ground. Since mobile homes have wooden floors and wooden framing, they contain a lot of cellulose. This makes mobile homes very attractive to subterranean termites.

Concrete block piers support many mobile homes. The termites can easily travel upward on the piers to reach the wood in the mobile home. They can also travel along the pipes and cables that are attached to the underside of the home.

If the mobile home has skirting, termites can also use it as a way to reach the wood in the home. Subterranean termites often make dirt tunnels on the inside of the skirting. They can stay hidden inside these tunnels and travel to find food in the mobile home. The termites can often work for a long time without being noticed. Because they can say hidden, they can often cause significant damage to the home.

Drywood termites do not live in the soil. They attack wood that is above ground level. These termites are common in the warmer parts of the United States. Their range extends from the Mid–Atlantic region, along the Gulf Coast, through the Southwest, and along the Pacific Coast.

During the spring and summer, drywood termite swarmers fly out of their colony to find mates. When they land on something that is made of wood, they settle into a crack and start to produce eggs. They excavate the crack to make their nest. As the colony grows, the termites enlarge the nest by eating the wood where they are nesting.

Mobile homes have wood on the exterior. Many mobile homes have wood siding. Many of them also have wood trim, shutters, and eaves. In many cases, the home is not skirted, so the wood underneath is also exposed.

Every year drywood termites attack hundreds of mobile homes. They find cracks in the wood trim where they make nests and start colonies. Although drywood termite colonies develop slowly, over time they can cause extensive damage. Experts recommend that homeowners have an annual termite inspection. Many termite control professionals offer this service. These experts have the tools to conduct a thorough inspection. They can recognize the signs of every type of termite activity. If treatment in required, they can recommend the treatment that will be most effective.

www.termite-control.com

mobile home with termites

I have a 1971 mobile home know I have termites. I had a small swarm in my home this summer. I really cannot afford to have my house tented and besides it does not always work the first time around. And you have to do all that repacking and then when you get back in you have to wash everything down. There must be and easier and cheaper way to get rid of these creatures.

Well yes, there is a way to get rid of termites without having to tent the home. First, you’ll need to educate yourself on termites so you’ll be better prepared to deal with this home invader. I suggest you start by reading our TERMITE CONTROL ARTICLE. It goes into extensive details about this insect including why they invade the home, how to control them and the products you’ll need to do the job. In my experience, I’ve treated many mobile homes with termites and in all cases it’s been an easy task to accomplish. This is true because I have experience with this pest but with a little guideance, you too can tackle the problem if you’re willing to do a little work to save a lot of money.

First, make sure you have subterranean termites. These are the kind that live in the ground. Drywood termites will thrive up in the structure and the treatments for both are quite different. In general, it’s much easier to control subterranean termites and if you read our article, you’ll learn how to tell the difference between the two if you’re not sure.

Second, make sure you don’t have any major leaks in your home. Leaks will enable termites to live above ground – up in the wood of the structure – and if they’re nesting up high, traditional ground treatments won’t work. To make sure there are no leaks, you’ll need to get down under the home and do a good inspection looking for any wet, puddling or any decaying wood members of the home.

Third, once you’re under the unit inspecting for any leaks, you should also be noting any pipes that come up from the ground, any support columns or poles, pillars or concrete blocks that look like they might be supporting the home as all of these can be pathways termites will use to get inside the home. In most cases, treating around all of these will be required to keep the termites out so be sure you know where they are all located and that they’re all accessible.

Lastly, decide if you want to apply some TERMIDOR or VIPER EC to the ground which will be what creates the termite barrier. We can help you make the decision and a big part of calculating how much you’ll need will be based on the dimensions of the area needing to be treated. If you have a “skirt” around the home or a foundation of any kind, it will need to be added to this total which is usually reported in “linear feet”. So if you have 100 linear to feet to treat, we’ll be able to tell you how much product you’ll need, how to mix it and how to apply it.

In summary, the cost of doing your own termite job will no doubt be a lot less compared to hiring a service company. To help you along the way, feel free to call us toll free at 1-800-877-7290 and one of our tech reps will be able to further assist. Yes, this will require some work and a willingness to get both a little dirty and expend a little energy. But in the end, the savings can be significant so it’s usually a good investment.

Here are direct links to the information and products listed above:

www.termites-swarming.com

Termites for mobile homes

В Both Subterranean and Drywood Termites can infest a mobile home. It is also possible for a termite inspector to document an assortment of wood boring beetles (whichВ are mandatory to report on with the Florida DACS 13645 WDO form) in a mobile home.В

В В The only real difference between a mobile home and a site built house is that a mobile is usually installed on a foundation of stacked concrete block columns supporting a steel frame instead of an in-ground concrete footing. Some site built houses—older structures and homes near rising bodies of water—are designed with concrete or wood piers. Most site built homes with piers include termite guards (an angled cap of sheet metal) at the the top of the pier below the wood framing to deter the advance of Subterranean Termite mud tubes. In 14 years of inspecting site built and mobile homes we have never noted the use of termite guards for a mobile home foundation.В

В В Both types of termites can enter a mobile in the same way that they would access a site built structure. Subterranean Termites utilize wood-to-earth contact or build mud tubes up the foundation. Drywood Termites enter by flying through a small opening or in infested wood furniture brought into the home. Treatment and protection methods for Drywood and/or Subterranean Termites is the same as for a site built home.

Can a mobile/manufactured home get termites?

www.mcgarryandmadsen.com

Termites for mobile homes

Can a mobile/manufactured home get termites?

Friday, July 20, 2018

Both Subterranean and Drywood Termites can infest a mobile home. It is also possible for a termite inspector to document an assortment of wood boring beetles (which are mandatory to report on with the Florida DACS 13645 WDO form) in a mobile home.

The only real difference between a mobile home and a site built house is that a mobile is usually installed on a foundation of stacked concrete block columns supporting a steel frame instead of an in-ground concrete footing. Some site built houses—older structures and homes near rising bodies of water—are designed with concrete or wood piers. Most site built homes with piers include termite guards (an angled cap of sheet metal) at the the top of the pier below the wood framing to deter the advance of Subterranean Termite mud tubes. In 14 years of inspecting site built and mobile homes we have never noted the use of termite guards for a mobile home foundation.

Both types of termites can enter a mobile in the same way that they would access a site built structure. Subterranean Termites utilize wood-to-earth contact or build mud tubes up the foundation. Drywood Termites enter by flying through a small opening or in infested wood furniture brought into the home. Treatment and protection methods for Drywood and/or Subterranean Termites is the same as for a site built home.

Mobile homes tend to have more moisture intrusion issues as they age compared to site built homes and wet wood is a favorite for termites. The “belly wrap” vapor barrier that covers the underside of the floor framing on a mobile home can obscure the view of evidence and damage from termites and easily retain moisture from plumbing leaks.

Loans secured through VA (Veterans Administration), and sometimes FHA (Federal Housing Administration) and USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) require WDO inspections on mobile homes, just like site-built homes and condominiums. Because these agencies oversee the purchase of safe livable homes for their buyers, it is a clear indicator that termites and other wood destroying organisms are a threat to mobile homes.

To learn more about termites, see these other blog posts:

www.howtolookatahouse.com

How do you recommend I get r >I live in a mobile home in FL. About 2yrs ago I had black flying insects only about 10 or so come out from somewhere swarming around my kitchen light. I suspected they were termites but dismissed it. During this time, I also had similar looking insects around the bottom of my toliet and flying in the bathroom. I only had about 20 or so in the bathroom flying. The bathtub and shower walls were replaced due to water damage and the toliet leaking issue was fixed. My father said he didn’t see any termites during that time. Now 1-2yrs later, I found termites in my kitchen wall eatting happily in a hole. I put tape over it and they ate the hole bigger. About 2 days later they decided to make another hole about a foot and a half away. I taped that hole. Next day they swarmed, under a 100 of those light brown termites. So I suspect I have dry rot termites from what I have read on the internet. I don’t have alot of money but want to replace the walls and framing in that area. I used bug spray several times in that wall but they still have come out every few days. The entire house is wood based. I recently replaced my kitchen cabinets from partical board to real wood. I have paneling throughout and partical board as a floor. My family suggests I abandoned the home. Is replacing walls/framing plus termite spraying a feasible way to rid my home of them for a while?

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May 21, 2013 – 06:11 PM

It really depends on how bad the damage is, and what species of termites you are dealing with. I am not sure what species you are referring to as “dry rot” termites, as “drywood termites” are usually the species associated with dry wood. Also, you could have an infestation of “formosan termites”, and the indicating factor here is whether you found them swarming at night.

In any case, you can certainly attempt some form of treatment before you abandon the home.

Here is a repost from a similar issue with Drywood termites –

Depending on where the drywood termites are located, a spot treatment with Termidor Foam can eliminate them in specific areas. Simply locate the “kickout” holes where the drywood termites are dumping their “frass” or wood pellets from and drill a small hole into this kickout hole. Drilling through the kickout hole will hopefully lead directly to the chambers inside of the wood in which they are eating nesting.

Drilling the entire wall and foaming the entire wall in a checkboard fashion with holes every 12 ” or so may also be necessary. If the termites are on an outside wall, and there is paneling or wood sheathing, drilling the same way, also drilling eaves, window boxes, etc, is recommended. The bottom line, drywood termites can be anywhere, and you have to drill as many holes as possible to get as much Termidor Foam as possible inside the walls. This could take 1 can of foam, it could take an entire case or more.

Any aerosol product such as D Foam, Invader, Premise Foam, etc, will work, but I recommend Termidor Foam.

Another option is to get Termidor SC and mix it into a Solo Wall Foamer. This is much more economical than using a case of foam. Its great for foaming an entire home, many walls. You will need the Solo Wall Foamer, Termidor SC and Foaming Agent such as Pro Foam Platinum. Mix the Termidor SC and Pro Foam with water into the sprayer and walla! Instant thick foam.

We also have a complete page on Drywood termite control – click here

Fumigation with Vikane is usually the recommended treatment for Drywood termites, as my recommendations are for spot treatment only. However, if you do this right, and kill the drywood termite colonies, you can reduce and maybe eliminate the need for fumigation. Many of our customers have done this with great success. If I had drywood termites in my home, I would certainly do everything possible to avoid fumigation. And if I had to do it, only as a last resort after I had exhausted all other options.

epestsupply.answerbase.com

Termites for mobile homes

In my area, Eastern NC, for the most part you have to have a contract with a pest exterminator and own your own land..as for cost. depends upon the company you choose and the extend of extermination you need.

You can get extermination products and treat yourself, but I personally would use a professional.

Once the termites have been treated then you will need to see what is needed for repairs of the damaged wood.

I am going to move this to the OT (Off Topic) forum as this is not a repair question.

Well we own our own land, so that’s not a problem. I’m going to call Terminex and Orkin today and schedule an evaluation with both of them to see what it’s going to cost. I have looked up termite information, and I don’t think we have a major infestation, nor do I want it to get that far. I definitely don’t want to try to treat this myself. This is a job for the pros.

Sorry about posting in the wrong spot. I’ll get this forum figured out eventually.

No problem, the forums themselves are pretty straight forward. the profiles, blogs etc can get confusing at times, LOL

Here’s a chart of the different treatments and costs. Might help.

Let us know how you do.

My MIL just paid Orkin $1,680 for Termite treatment on the DW we just bought from her.

They trenched and sprayed/injected a chemical around exterior and interior perimeter of block skirting wall.

Did same around each block column pier and all pipes and injected foam in blocks every 8″-10″ for 10 ft. out in each direction from end of damage.

Good for 1 year with renewal at $236 per year option.

Whether we’re pleased or displeased will be known at end of our top brass from that branch pow-wow with me Weds. afternoon.

www.mobilehomerepair.com

Mobile Home Pest Control Tips

Mobile home living has a lot of advantages. For one, it’s far cheaper than owning and maintaining a traditional house. Like any home though, mobile homes are susceptible to pest problems, that’s why we have put together these mobile home pest control tips. If you missed our previous article, here are some more tips for mobile home pest control.

Every Pest Is A Threat To Mobile Homes

Since mobile homes are not usually secured to the ground in the same way that traditional homes are, there are more areas underneath the house that can be a point of entry for pests.

Some of the more common pests you might encounter in the home are cockroaches, ants, rodents such as mice and rats and termites. All of these can disrupt your life and some can even damage the structure of the home itself.

Mobile Home

Mobile homes often contain less exterior sheathing than traditional brick and mortar home, so critter and pest damage from termites are often quickly exacerbated.

Not only can the damage from these pests become severe more rapidly, but also normal household pests like cockroaches and ants can often create larger infestations in mobile homes as opposed to brick and mortar homes. This is due to several factors, chief among them the fact that there is usually less insulation in a mobile home, exposing some areas of the home to the elements to a greater degree, making them a more hospitable environment for the bugs.

This doesn’t mean mobile homes are inferior to site-built homes. It simply means that they are made differently. Mobile homes are cheaper for a reason but still offer the same benefits of traditional housing.

New doors and windows can help keep critters and pest out of mobile homes. Read our Complete Guide to Mobile Home Doors here or our mobile home window guide.

Preparation Is The Best Thing You Can Do

Since mobile homes are somewhat more susceptible both to infestations and to the damage that they can cause, it is important to prepare yourself and your home to prevent these problems from even occurring in the first place.

Perhaps the best preparation is to make sure that you keep every area of your house as clean as possible, including where trash is kept and especially the areas such as pantries and kitchens where food is stored.

Pests of all kinds are almost always drawn into a home first by the availability of food, and removing this from the equation is a sure-fire way to keep your home safe.

Know The Tools Needed To Kill Pests If They Do Get In

Obviously, the answer to your pest problem will depend on several factors, the size of the infestation, the type of pest and your budget. However, there are a few hard and fast rules that will help with any bugs or rodents.

First, always make sure that you use the recommended amount of product first when applying sprays or baits. Using too much can actually have a negative effect on the overall pest elimination process.

Also, you should be sure to carefully read, understand and follow the manufacturer’s directions whenever using chemical products to kill or deter pests in and around your home.

For some termites, sprays aren’t as effective. The bugs are often h >

mobilehomeliving.org

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