Termite Resistant Wood 101

Termite Resistant Wood 101

Need to hire an exterminator? Get a free estimate online from top local home service pros in your area.

Especially in warmer climates, termites are a constant threat even to the most skillfully crafted wood structures. Termite damage isn’t inevitable, though. Choosing termite resistant wood goes a long way toward preventing these bugs from making a meal of your property.

Natural Termite Resistance

Termites live on the cellulose found in wood or certain other plant materials, such as cotton. While they can eat any type of wood, there are some species they prefer to avoid as much as possible. Broadly speaking, termites dislike heartwood. This is the dry, non-living inner part of the tree truck. Heartwood contains less cellulose than the outer sapwood, making it less nutritious for termites.

If you’re choosing wood for its termite resistance, look for heartwood grade lumber. This lumber typically has the word “heart” in the grade name, such as “Clear Heart” or “Heart B.” As an added benefit, heartwood is also more resistant to rot than other grades.

Some tree species have a natural resistant to termites. They’re not impervious to these bugs, but they’re highly unattractive to them and unlikely to be eaten. Cedar is tops among these. This includes southern red cedar, western red cedar, and Alaska (yellow) cedar, among others. Availability varies by region, but western red cedar lumber can be found in most areas.

Redwood lumber, popular for its rich red-brown color, is also distasteful to termites. It’s most widely available where it grows on the west coast.

Cypress, in particular Arizona cypress, bald cypress, and tidewater (red) cypress is another good choice for discouraging termites. Its durability, along with the visual appeal of its light color and straight grain make it ideal for exteriors and interior trim.

White oak and chestnut oak resist termites well. White oak is a common choice for flooring, thanks in part to its wide availability. Chestnut oak lumber is less common, but when available, it’s often sold as “mixed white oak.”

Other naturally termite-resistant wood species include:

  • Black cherry
  • Black walnut
  • Chestnut
  • Honey mesquite

Depending on what you’re planning to build, however, some of these woods may not be practical choices. Due to their cost, hardwoods such as cherry, walnut, and chestnut are typically reserved for use in fine furniture and cabinetry. Honey mesquite is relatively rare and may be hard to find in large quantities

Wood Products Designed for Durability

If none of the wood species with the greatest natural resistance to termites are right for your needs, there are some alternatives worth considering. These products typically do an even better job of holding off termites than natural woods.

Need to hire an exterminator? Get a free estimate online from top local home service pros in your area.

One of these is pressure treated wood from any tree species. Pressure treated wood has undergone a process that impregnates the wood’s pores with chemical preservatives, making it nearly impervious to rot and insect infestations. For health reasons, this wood should not be used where food is grown or prepared or for children’s play equipment.

Composite lumber, made by combining waste wood fiber and plastic, is completely impervious to termites. Offering the beauty of natural wood at a lower cost, composite lumber is popular for use in decks, furniture, and siding.

pestkilled.com

Cedar Wood

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Do Termites Eat Cedar Wood

Siding – Wikipedia
Ants and termites are a threat to many types of wood siding, Wood siding in overlapping horizontal rows or “courses” is called clapboard, Wood siding can also be made of naturally rot-resistant woods such as redwood or cedar. Drop siding. Variations on horizontal, wooden siding. . Read Article

FACT SHEET – OhioWood
However, in this fact sheet, the general term “powderpost beetles” is used for members of these three beetle families (Lyctidae, Anobiidae, Bostrichids do not re-infest wood after it is dry. Determining Whether an Infestation is Active or Inactive . Access Document

Pests Of Honey Bees PM
PESTS OF HONEY BEES February 2000 Honey bees are fortunate in that they have relatively few early fall. Wood, involved since most eat insects smaller than honey bees. In ROACHES, EARWIGS, ETC. . Read Here

Carpenter Ants And Trees – Georgia Forestry Commission .
Do not eat wood. However, they do excavate shallow nests in moist, decaying wood, creating smooth (as, if sanded) walls. Carpenter ants will generally infest Microsoft Word – Carpenter Ants and Trees Author: kkeck Created Date: . Return Doc

Formosan Subterranean Termites – Colorado.agrilife.org
Formosan subterranean termites belong to the cedar, willow, wax myrtle, Chinese elm and white oak (Fig. 10). While native subterranean termites generally feed on the softer wood produced dur-ing spring growth and avoid the harder summer growth wood, Formosan termites eat both (Fig. 11). . Get Content Here

WILL SUBTERRANEAN TERMITES CONSUME LANDSCAPE MULCHES?
WILL SUBTERRANEAN TERMITES CONSUME LANDSCAPE MULCHES? small amount of cedar (Juniperus silicicola [Small] Bailey), camphor (dnnamomum camphora [L.] J. Presl), and southern pines termites. Wood samples from 3 tree species were also tested. . Read Document

Yellow-Poplar Lumber For Exterior Architectural Applications .
Economical wood species for exterior termites. Fortunately, termites are usually controlled by other means, Yellow-Poplar Lumber for Exterior Architectural Applications in New Construction and for Historical Restoration . Return Document

BOOK 2 INSPECTOR’S GUIDE SERIES
BOOK 2 INSPECTOR’S GUIDE SERIES Practical help for the real estate industry Subterranean termites do not make kick-out holes in the wood. dry wood and damp wood termites eat across the grain in any direction. . Fetch Doc

CHAPTER 6 – Insects – Weinspectrealestate.com
CHAPTER 6 – Insects 6.1 General Insects are not just nuisances, In summary, termites like to eat wood and they don’t care if it’s in your home. In areas subject to wood of baldcypress, redwood, and cedar. Due to . Read More

Formosan Subterranean Termites
Ormosan subterranean termites are wood- Figure 3.Carton nest of Formosan subterranean termites. Formosan –wings greater than 11mm –wings with many fine to cherry laurel, sweet gum, cedar, willow, wax myrtle, Chinese elm and white oak. While native subterranean termites feed on the . Document Retrieval

TERMITE CONTROL: ANSWERS FOR THE HOMEOWNER
TERMITE CONTROL: ANSWERS FOR THE HOMEOWNER Mike Potter, Urban Extension Entomologist The Entomology Department receives Termites damage wood slowly enough that the amount of damage caused by an additional day, week or month of continued activity is . Read More

CEDAR GLADE SPECIES LIST – Middle Tennessee State University
CEDAR GLADE SPECIES LIST PRODUCERS LIST PLANTS Prickly-Pear Cactus, do not eat; feed young a certain type of larvae Black & Yellow Mud Dauber, Sceliphron termites, & ants) Spotted Salamander, Ambystoma maculatum – . Access Content

Mesquite – Wikipedia
Mesquite is the common name for the genus Prosopis, The Cahuilla indigenous people of western North America were known to eat the seeds of mesquite. History. Prosopis Mesquite Roasted Coffee web site devoted to mesquite wood fire roasting of coffee; Mesquite Local Business Directory; . Read Article

ARSENIC IN PRESSURE-TREATED WOOD
Resistant, it is injected with preservatives that are embedded in the wood to ward off termites, rot, and fun. ne wood or cedar, ARSENIC IN PRESSURE-TREATED WOOD . Access This Document

FOR THE BEST FOAM PROTECTION AGAINST TERMITES Insulate And .
FOR THE BEST FOAM PROTECTION AGAINST TERMITES There’s no need to let termite tunneling dig away at your bottom line, with STYROFOAM termites and other wood-destroying insects. A Snap to Install . View Doc

The Management And Challenges Of ¹Etudaiye Engworo Abdulwahab .
In addition to wood termites also eat paper, bark mulch, and dead tree roots. They can also damage According to Paul and Reuben (2005) damp wood termites do not present wide spread past such as rubber mulch or treated cedar. viii. Openings in Your Homes Foundation, Roof, and . Read More

Juniperus Ashei – Wikipedia
Juniperus ashei (Ashe juniper, post cedar, mountain cedar, or blueberry juniper) They contain 1-2 seeds, which are dispersed when birds eat the cones and pass the seeds in their droppings. The male cones are 3–5 mm The wood is naturally rot resistant and provides raw material for fence . Read Article

Clear Palntable En Pentaseal wood Preservative
Applicators must not eat, drink, Do not apply to wood intended for use Redwood and Cedar Siding and wood Window sash recommend the application of a water repellent wood preservative such as Pentaseal as an aid to paint . View Document

LivingWithBugs
Copyright 2009 LivingWithBugs.com Name (click name for image) Identification Types of colonies in wood Termites consume wood fiber (cellulose); damage usually starts on the inside these beetles do not normally reinfest wood after the first generation. The old house borer may . Access Full Source

2014 Tri River Area Pest Management Workshop 301 Wood .
Termites are unusual in the insect world; they eat and digest cellulose. Cedar roofs are ideal for drywood termites. Pest Management Workshop 301 Wood Destroying Organism. () . Doc Retrieval

AND IT’S USES – Real Cedar
RESISTANCE TO TERMITES AND WOOD BORERS Western Red Cedar’s natural is “non-preferred” i.e., the termites will not eat Western Red Cedar if they have access to other wood species with less resistance. DIMENSIONAL STABILITY Western Red Cedar wood has excellent dimensional stability . Doc Viewer

Non Toxic Wood Treatment To Protect Your Raised Beds Instead .
John from http://www.growingyourgreens.com/ demonstrates the ecowood treatment to protect is cedar wood container garden. In this episode John will talk abou . View Video

FOR-54: Wood-Destroying Organisms & Wood Preservatives
These ants do not eat wood. Instead, they damage WOOD PRESERVATIVES Some tree species produce natural toxins in their heartwood that make them quite resistant to insects and Cedar Resistant Juniper Resistant Cherry Resistant White oaks Resistant . View Document

cedarwoodhebinie.blogspot.com

What Will Termite Companies Never Tell You? (Part 1)

– Do termites like redwood?

– What makes wood susceptible to termites?

– To be Followed by: Termite Prevention

This article series is a summary of years of construction work observations.

Termites are not the only wood-eating pests, but they do the most damage to homes in Southern California.

There are two main classes of problem termites in Southern Califonia (and the country) : drywood termites and subterranean (underground) termites. The drywood type is seen much more often and likes wood with low moisture in it. Subterranean termites live under ground and like moisture.

To get to wood s ubterranean termites will make a mud tube or tunnel going up across the concrete foundation to the wood. They are usually known by their tubes and which are hidden under the building. Sometimes they are visible on the outside of a foundation or inside a house. You can do an internet search for pictures of all this. As they are less common in my experience than the drywood type I am not certain but I do believe that they prefer the same wood as the drywood termites do (more on that later). I do know that by far most boards in most houses do not have termites. But I also have seen sections of many boards of house framing destroyed by termites – enough that I was wondering just what was holding up that part of the house?

There is a datum that most people have heard: Termites will stay away from redwood and cedar. But is it true?

As a contractor, I believed this too. Until in one year, about 10 or 15 years ago, I saw three redwood decks at three different houses in the Los Angeles area. These decks had been pretty well demolished by termites. Either termites had changed their dietary preferences, or there is more to the story. Or both.

A few years later I overhauled another house with two redwood decks. The redwood ALL needed replacing, due to rot and termite damage. However the important lessons were not in the redwood, but what I observed in the supporting joist boards.

I had always wondered – why do termites eat some boards, and not others?

Most of the wood under a first floor – above a crawl space, and most of the wood in an attic, is completely accessible to termites. Actually, given that termites only need about a 1/8″ gap to get to a board, most boards in a house are accessible to termites So why (by far) are most boards on most houses termite-free? (They don’t get a chemical treatment when they are built!)

The joists in that last house mentioned above ran under the floor and stuck out over the hill. The decks boards were laid across them and nailed in. As this was an older hillside home – by L.A. standards – the joists were fully exposed under the house. This is where it gets interesting. In board after board, the termite damage only went back about six or eight inches under the wall of the house. Only one board had termite damage about two feet back, but the rest, some 30 boards, only had damage under the house 6-8″ back. But where exposed to the weather, they were all damaged to the point where it was dangerous to walk on the deck.

WHY did the termites stop?

Visit my next post (next week) where we will explore the answers to these questions.

drionconstruction.com

Do Termites Eat Cedar?

Yes, Termites Can Eat Cedar. But Do They? That’s Another Story…

Termites can eat cedar but they tend to stay away from it because cedar wood has resin and oil that tends to repel them. Some scientists have even found that these resins are toxic to the termites that decide to ingest them.

However, as with all wood and even lumber, resins and sap seep out of the wood over time. This process is expedited when wood exposed to the elements. In the video below you can see termites in the stump seem unaffected by the cedar resins that are toxic to them.

Why is that? Well, you can also see by the condition of this stump that quite a bit of rot has already taken place. My guess is that the poisonous resins are no longer present in the wood and this cedar stump is obviously no longer resistant to an infestation.

Why Do Termites Avoid Cedar?

Scientists observed that cedar was not only repelling termites but also toxic to the termites who did try consuming it. Because of this cedar is a great type of wood to use for certain parts of construction projects.

Cedar is actually one of more expensive types of lumber to use for construction which makes is impractical to use for the entire structure. Additionally, it would be nearly impossible to remove and replace some of the structural lumber with cedar since doing so would require demolishing significant portions of a house. Because of this, some termiticide companies are attempting to develop ways to emulate the repelling capability of cedar to treat normal lumbar. As of now, no such chemical has been developed but there is an alternative chemical that is often applied to wood to achieve a similar affect.

Termites eating rotten cedar tree stump.

Borate Wood Treatment As Alternative To Cedar

The most common chemical used to treat lumber to make it resistant to different wood damaging insects is borate. There are several borate based solutions on the market but the active ingredient in all of them is borate. Borate is usually applied to lumber prior to the construction by either brushing it or spraying it onto the wood. It can even be mixed in with paint and applied to the siding of a home or a wooden fence.

However it is sometimes used after the fact as well in spot treatment procedures. In these instances an area infested by termites is identified and the borate mixture is injected to this area through drilled holes.

Some borate companies claim that borate treatment will last the life of the wood and that it not only protects against termites but also carpenter ants, wood boring beetles, and even wood-eating fungi.

Are There Other Types of Wood Naturally Resistant To Termites?

There are other naturally termite resistant woods that seem to naturally repel termites including redwood and cypress. However, like cedar wood, these may keep termites away but the wood itself tends to begin breaking down sooner and do not last as long as other types of wood.

mytermitetreatmentcosts.com

Do Termites Eat Cedar?

Yes, Termites Can Eat Cedar. But Do They? That’s Another Story…

Termites can eat cedar but they tend to stay away from it because cedar wood has resin and oil that tends to repel them. Some scientists have even found that these resins are toxic to the termites that decide to ingest them.

However, as with all wood and even lumber, resins and sap seep out of the wood over time. This process is expedited when wood exposed to the elements. In the video below you can see termites in the stump seem unaffected by the cedar resins that are toxic to them.

Why is that? Well, you can also see by the condition of this stump that quite a bit of rot has already taken place. My guess is that the poisonous resins are no longer present in the wood and this cedar stump is obviously no longer resistant to an infestation.

Why Do Termites Avoid Cedar?

Scientists observed that cedar was not only repelling termites but also toxic to the termites who did try consuming it. Because of this cedar is a great type of wood to use for certain parts of construction projects.

Cedar is actually one of more expensive types of lumber to use for construction which makes is impractical to use for the entire structure. Additionally, it would be nearly impossible to remove and replace some of the structural lumber with cedar since doing so would require demolishing significant portions of a house. Because of this, some termiticide companies are attempting to develop ways to emulate the repelling capability of cedar to treat normal lumbar. As of now, no such chemical has been developed but there is an alternative chemical that is often applied to wood to achieve a similar affect.

Termites eating rotten cedar tree stump.

Borate Wood Treatment As Alternative To Cedar

The most common chemical used to treat lumber to make it resistant to different wood damaging insects is borate. There are several borate based solutions on the market but the active ingredient in all of them is borate. Borate is usually applied to lumber prior to the construction by either brushing it or spraying it onto the wood. It can even be mixed in with paint and applied to the siding of a home or a wooden fence.

However it is sometimes used after the fact as well in spot treatment procedures. In these instances an area infested by termites is identified and the borate mixture is injected to this area through drilled holes.

Some borate companies claim that borate treatment will last the life of the wood and that it not only protects against termites but also carpenter ants, wood boring beetles, and even wood-eating fungi.

Are There Other Types of Wood Naturally Resistant To Termites?

There are other naturally termite resistant woods that seem to naturally repel termites including redwood and cypress. However, like cedar wood, these may keep termites away but the wood itself tends to begin breaking down sooner and do not last as long as other types of wood.

mytermitetreatmentcosts.com

Share:
No Comments

Leave a Reply

Your e-mail will not be published. All fields are required.

×
Recommend