What To Do If You Find A Red Back Spider?

What To Do If You Find A Red Back Spider?

  • Home
  • Services
    • Household Pest Control
    • Commercial Pest Control
    • Rental Property Pest Control
    • Warehouse Pest Control
  • Pests
    • Termite Protection
    • Termite Inspections
    • Possum Removal
    • Rodent Control
    • Bird Control
    • Wasp Removal
    • Ant Control
    • Bed Bug Treatment
    • Spider Control
    • Cockroach Control
    • Flea Control
    • Moth Control
  • Termites
    • Termite Treatment
    • Termite Inspections
    • Termites Are In My House!
  • Blog
  • About Us
    • Testimonials
  • Contact
  • Home
  • Services
    • Household Pest Control
    • Commercial Pest Control
    • Rental Property Pest Control
    • Warehouse Pest Control
  • Pests
    • Termite Protection
    • Termite Inspections
    • Possum Removal
    • Rodent Control
    • Bird Control
    • Wasp Removal
    • Ant Control
    • Bed Bug Treatment
    • Spider Control
    • Cockroach Control
    • Flea Control
    • Moth Control
  • Termites
    • Termite Treatment
    • Termite Inspections
    • Termites Are In My House!
  • Blog
  • About Us
    • Testimonials
  • Contact

How to Get Rid of Red Back Spiders

    August 15, 2018
  • Posted by: Sean Cannon
  • Category: Uncategorized

British comedian Ricky Gervais likes the look of Australian beaches — and as an animal lover, he also loves our cute little Koalas. But he refuses to come here. Why? “You’ve got the most dangerous spiders, and you walk around in flip-flops,” he said in an interview.

But are our spiders really that bad? Well, not all of them. But there are a few you should really be wary of, and one of them has that iconic red stripe on its back.

If you find a redback in your home, you should get rid of it. But where there’s one there’s more, so for the safety of your family that raises the question we’ll answer in a moment — how to get rid of red back spiders?

The worst thing about redback spiders is not that they are venomous. Think about it: if they all lived 100 kilometres from the nearest human, that’s no big deal. But redbacks actually love to live right near us and our homes.

Why? Redback spiders, found throughout Australia, love places that are dark, dry and warm. It’s common to find them inside children’s toys like Tonka trucks that are left out in the back yard and sand pits. Inside shoes or garden sheds, letterboxes and cubbies are also places redback spiders are found.

Want to get rid of redbacks? The first step is to identify them…

What does a Redback Spider look like?

You can’t contemplate how to get rid of red back spiders if you can’t spot them. Luckily, nature has put a bright red stripe on the back to help.

But that’s only the adult female. Juvenile females are actually brown with white markings, while the males lack the red stripe, are brown and generally much smaller.

Because the male redback is smaller, so are the fangs — so it’s actually rare to be bitten by one. A bite from the larger female is highly venomous and painful. Although rarely serious for adults a redback spider bite can definitely still be very harmful to kids and the elderly.

If you can’t spot redback spiders, look for their home — that’s a definite trick of red back spider pest control. It’s much easier to see redback spiders if you find their distinctively messy web.

How to Get Rid Of Red Back Spiders

1. Spring clean!

It doesn’t have to be Spring to clean!

There are plenty of places redbacks like to hide, including under outdoor furniture, trampolines, wood piles and also in gardening gloves and clothing (and plenty of other places!). The best way to locate them is to be extremely careful, and start cleaning up more regularly.

Wood heaps, piles of scraps and garden waste or old tyres are great places for redbacks to live, so think about relocating them away from the home. Stacking anything against your walls is basically just inviting a nasty redback to set up camp. Getting rid of redbacks starts with minimising places for them to inhabit.

2. Remove the webs

If you vigilantly get rid of spider webs, you basically starve the spider.

An easy way to disrupt the web and also those red back spider eggs is to get a stick and twist it until the web is destroyed. But please be careful. When you’re doing your DIY redback spider disruption, make sure to wear enclosed shoes and gloves.

3. Don’t forget the ceiling

If you find those pesky red back spiders keep coming, it’s time to get out the ladder and look in the roof cavity.

See also:  What Eats False Widow Spiders?

One client noticed a lot of redbacks in their house and a few in the actual downlights. The roof void was checked, and a serious infestation was found there.

4. Call in the pros

Especially as the warmer months start to loom, do consider calling in local pest control experts like Cannon Pest Management. We can thoroughly check your house and garden for all the most likely redback hiding spots, and they know everything about the critter’s habits, lifestyle, and vulnerabilities.

How to get rid of redback spiders? It’s simple: Contact Cannon Pest Management today!

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Recent Posts
  • 5 Easy DIY Possum Deterrents For Your Home & Garden February 4, 2019
  • Pest Control for Food Storage Warehouses December 5, 2018
  • Who Is Responsible For Pest Control In A Rental Property? November 29, 2018
  • How do termite bait stations work? November 13, 2018
Pest Control Services
  • Termite Inspections
  • Termite Treatment
  • Possum Removal
  • Rodent Control
  • Bird Control
  • All Services >>
  • Home
  • Services
  • Household Pest Control
  • Commercial Pest Control
  • Rental Property Pest Control
  • Warehouse Pest Control
  • Pests
  • Termite Protection
  • Termite Inspections
  • Possum Removal
  • Rodent Control
  • Bird Control
  • Wasp Removal
  • Ant Control
  • Bed Bug Treatment
  • Spider Control
  • Cockroach Control
  • Flea Control
  • Moth Control
  • Termites
  • Termite Treatment
  • Termite Inspections
  • Termites Are In My House!
  • Blog
  • About Us
  • Testimonials
  • Contact

Giving my first ever Google review to Sean. He is on time, replies message timely and honest. Called Sean for terminate inspection, rodent control and bird control. At first appointment, Sean spent more than two hours cleaning the rubbish left by the birds and installed barriers on a 33 degree humid day. The barriers were matching color to my house’s color and the finishing is beautiful. The price is very reasonable. Couldn’t not be happier with his services.

I highly recommend Cannon Pest Management for all of your pest control needs. Sean’s prompt and professional service along with competitive pricing was much appreciated. We’d definitely use Sean again.

I first contacted Sean to fix a very bad ant problem. He was prompt and very professional, and more importantly very good at his job.We have not had a problem with ants now for more than two and a half years. I would not hesitate in recommending Cannon Pest Control.

Debunked a lot of myths, thorough work, great advice beyond the actual job. Friendly and professional.

I have used Cannon Pest Management for Termite Prevention, Rodent Control & General Pest Sprays. Sean has been helping keep our home pest free for over 4 years! Professional & reliable services. I highly recommend Cannon Pest Management for your Pest Control needs.

Efficient, honest, prompt, reliable, quick to respond, approachable and easy to talk to. Sean is a professional at his work. I am the owner of Chapter Too café in Heathmont and I believe Sean is as professional as they come. On top of the excellent services provided, Sean took the time to give me some free advice regarding pest control management. It’s always nice to know that dealing with the business owner directly. I would recommend Cannan pest control without hesitation as I have found his services as I mentioned above in the first line, excellent.

After thorough research, we engaged Sean from Cannon Pest Management to eliminate spiders from our family home. To us, choosing a pest control provider was an important decision because we knew that our property and health could be compromised by pesticides in the wrong hands. With two asthmatic young children, Sean was family (and pet) conscious in his approach, and delivered a quality, affordable and highly competent service. We were provided with clear and detailed information about the products being used, as well as instructions about preparing for, and preserving the life of the treatment. Sean was professional, knowledgeable and flexible in all his dealings with us, and most importantly, it was no time at all before the spiders were dropping like flies. We can’t thank you enough for helping us to keep our family home spider free Sean. See you same time next year!!

Great service from Sean. Timely, well priced, knowledgeable and a genuinely nice guy. Would recommend to anyone in the Eastern Suburbs of Melbourne.

We had Sean come and inspect and treat our home for termites. Sean was extremely thorough and diligent. Very satisfied with his service. Professional and hard working.

First contacted Sean a year ago when needing someone to deal with spiders and cockroaches at our previous house. He impressed me as someone well-experienced and knowledgable, no bull or high pressure sales talk, just down to earth, informative and stating the facts. We were really happy with his work and so even after moving further away from the area to our new house, we didn’t hesitate to contact him and use him again — not bothering to contact anyone more local to compare as we know he does a thorough and great job at a competitive price. Hoghly recommended.

See also:  Spider Bite When To Worry?

We have used Sean’s services for a number of years particularly in combating our ongoing possum problems. His service has always been excellent I would recommend him to anyone with a pest problem.

I highly recommend Sean. He was punctual, very professional and followed through until the job was done. We had a difficult to remove possum in the roof and Sean persisted, visiting the property multiple times until he was gone. Excellent service all round at a fair price.

I very much recommend Sean at Cannon Pest Management. From the start he was responsive, open and fair. He is an expert at what he does, and it shows. Thanks Sean.

Excellent and professional service. Highly recommend Sean from Cannon Pest Management!

Sean is very professional and friendly. I use Cannon pest management every 18 months for my house. I’m very happy with Sean’s work. Thank you.

Excellent service and very thorough- spent several hours on site. Report was finalised quickly. Highly recommend

www.cannonpestmanagement.com.au

Redback Spider

  • Share this page:
  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on Twitter
  • Share on Linkedin
  • Share via Email
  • Print this page

Introduction

Redback Spiders are found throughout Australia and are common in disturbed and urban areas.

Identification

Redback spiders (Latrodectus hasselti) belong to the Family Theridiidae, which is found worldwide. The notorious Black Widow Spider (Latrodectus sp) of the United States is a close relative of the Redback Spider, and only differs in appearance by the absence of a red dorsal stripe. Other species of Latrodectus occur in Africa, New Zealand (the Katipo), the Pacific Islands, Europe and North and South America.

Female Redback Spiders are black (occasionally brownish) with an obvious orange to red longitudinal stripe on the upper abdomen, with the red stripe sometimes being broken, and an «hourglass» shaped red/orange spot on the underside of the abdomen. Juveniles have additional white markings on the abdomen. Females have a body about the size of a large pea and slender legs.

The males’ red markings are often less distinct. The body is light brown with white markings on the upper side of the abdomen, and a pale hour-glass marking on the underside.

Red Back Spider, Latrodectus hasselti

Red Back Spider, Latrodectus hasselti

Red Back Spider web

Female Red Back Spider, Latrodectus hasselti

Female Red Back Spider with egg sac, Latrodectus hasselti

Habitat

Webs consist of a tangled, funnel-like upper retreat area from which vertical, sticky catching threads run to ground attachments. The Redback Spider favours proximity to human habitation, with webs being built in dry, sheltered sites, such as among rocks, in logs, shrubs, junk-piles, sheds, or toilets. Redback Spiders are less common in winter months.

Stay in the know

Get our monthly emails for amazing animals, research insights and museum events

Distribution

They are found Australia-wide and will live almost anywhere as long as there is adequate food, a sheltered web site and warm enough for breeding. They are especially common in disturbed and urban areas, in association with human habitation.

Feeding and diet

Insects are the usual prey of Redback Spiders, but they are capable of capturing quite large animals, such as male trapdoor spiders, king crickets and small lizards, if they become entangled in the web. Prey-stealing is also common, with large females taking stored food items from others’ webs.

Life history cycle

Once the female has mated, she can store sperm and use it over a period of up to two years to lay several batches of eggs. She spends much time producing up to ten round egg sacs (1cm diameter), which are white, weathering to brown over time. Each egg sac contains approximately 250 eggs and only one to three weeks need to pass before more eggs can be laid. These sacs are suspended within the web. Sometimes small ichneumonid wasps parasitise them, puncturing each sac with tiny holes. The young spiderlings hatch in two to four weeks. Spiderlings are cannibalistic and will eat unhatched eggs and other spiderlings. The spiderlings disperse by ballooning to another suitable nest site on long silk threads that are caught by air currents.

Females mature on average in about four months. The smaller male matures on average in about 90 days. Females may live for two to three years, whereas males only live for about six or seven months.

Breeding behaviours

Male Redback Spiders do not produce a web, but may be found on the fringe of a female’s web, especially during the summer mating season. The male has to make overtures to the female to discover whether she is ready to mate, which can prove fatal if she mistakes him for prey. It has been found that in order to occupy the female’s attention during mating, the male spider offers her his abdomen by standing on his head and ‘somersaulting’ his abdomen towards her mouthparts. The female begins to squirt digestive juices onto the male’s abdomen while the first palp is inserted. If he is not too weak, he will manage to withdraw, and then insert the second palp. She will continue to ‘digest’ his abdomen. Most males do not survive this process, which seems to be unique to Latrodectus hasselti.

See also:  What Can You Feed Spiders?

Predators

Daddy-long-legs Spiders and White-tailed Spiders are known to catch and kill Redback Spiders.

Danger to humans

Redback bites occur frequently, particularly over the summer months. More than 250 cases receive antivenom each year, with several milder envenomations probably going unreported. Only the female bite is dangerous. They can cause serious illness and have caused deaths. However, since Redback Spiders rarely leave their webs, humans are not likely to be bitten unless a body part such as a hand is put directly into the web, and because of their small jaws many bites are ineffective. The venom acts directly on the nerves, resulting in release and subsequent depletion of neurotransmitters.

Common early symptoms are pain (which can become severe), sweating (always including local sweating at bite site), muscular weakness, nausea and vomiting. Antivenom is available. No deaths have occurred since its introduction.

Apply an ice pack to the bitten area to relieve pain. Do not apply a pressure bandage (venom movement is slow and pressure worsens pain). Collect the spider for positive identification. Seek medical attention.

Evolutionary relationships

It was once thought that the Redback Spider, Latrodectus hasselti, was a sub species of the Black Widow Spider but it is now known to be a distinct species.

Recent research on the DNA sequences of all recognized Latrodectus species indicates that the Redback is a distinct species, most closely related to the New Zealand Katipo, and probably an Australian native.

Redbacks have most likely become much more common since European settlers started providing them with lots of the kinds of places they like to make webs in.

References

  • Simon-Brunet, S. 1994. The Silken Web: a natural history of Australian Spiders.Reed Books.
  • Preston-Mafham, R. 1991. The Book of Spiders and Scorpions. Quarto Publishing.
  • Pyers, G. 1999. Australian Animals: Spiders. Heinemann Library.
  • Forster, L. 1995. The behavioural ecology of Latrodectus hasselti (Thorell), the Australian Redback Spider (Araneae: Theridiidae): a review. Records of the Western Australian Museum Supplement No. 52: 13-24.
  • York Main, B. 1976. Spiders. The Australian Naturalist Library, Collins, Sydney.
  • Garb, J. E., A. Gonzalez, & R. G. Gillespie (2004). The black widow spider genus Latrodectus (Araneae: Theridiidae): phylogeny, biogeography, and invasion history. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution. 31, 1127-1142.

Also in this section

You may also be interested in.

Spider webs

Different groups of spiders build different types of webs, depending on the type of prey they capture and the location of the web.

Spider bites and venoms

Spider venoms are a cocktail of many chemicals.

AMplify episode 29: Live at the AM — Should We Fear Spiders?

What are the symptoms and treatments for spider bites? Is our fear of spiders evolutionary or cultural? Can Arachnophobia be cured?

Egg sacs, spiderlings and dispersal

Find out how spiders protect their eggs and how the newly hatched spiders make their way into the world.

An introduction to spiders

Spiders belong to an ancient group of animals called the Arachnida.

Tarantulas — the truth behind their evil image

Tarantulas are the movie stars of the spider world.

Cupboard Spiders

At a casual glance the female Cupboard Spider could easily be mistaken for a Redback Spider, without that distinctive red stripe on the back.

Sydney’s Wildest Halloween Party Returns with Jurassic Lounge

The Australian Museum will be remixed by artists, scientists and DJs as an after-hours playground for adults (and dinosaurs) on Saturday 29 October 2016.

Classifying spiders

By studying and classifying spiders, scientists learn about their diversity, biology, distribution and evolutionary relationships.

White-tailed Spider

White-tailed Spider bites have been controversially implicated in causing severe skin ulceration in humans.

Spiders in the House and Garden

Almost all spiders possess venom for the purpose of subduing their prey, which are normally insects.

Spider facts

Find answers to commonly asked questions and discover interesting facts about spiders in Australia, New Zealand and dangerous spiders around the world.

The Australian Museum respects and acknowledges the Gadigal people of the Eora Nation as the First Peoples and Traditional Custodians of the land and waterways on which the Museum stands.

We acknowledge Elders past, present and emerging.
This website may contain names, images and voices of deceased Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Connect with us
  • The Australian Museum Facebook page
  • The Australian Museum Twitter account
  • The Australian Museum on Instagram
  • The Australian Museum Linkedin profile
  • The Australian Museum YouTube channel
Join our Newsletter

Receive the latest news on events, exhibitions, science research and special offers.

australianmuseum.net.au

Share:
No comments

Добавить комментарий

Your e-mail will not be published. All fields are required.