Tick Control — Management

Grape Tick: Effective Control Methods

Tick Control & Management

WARNING: Be sure to read, understand, and follow all chemical product label instructions, recommendations, and safety precautions thoroughly prior to using any chemical application or treatment.

Select from tables summarizing chemicals and formulations labeled for use in the control and management of ticks on livestock and companion animals, and for premise treatment of homes, yards, stables, pastures, rangeland, and recreational areas:

Poultry

Sheep&Goats

Swine

Overview of Tactics For Integrated Tick Control & Management

This section provides guidelines to prevent tick introductions and to control infestations using a variety of tactics that are adaptable to various landscapes, including residential homes, rangeland, parks and recreational areas, companion animals to livestock.

Successful control of a tick population is dependent upon the effectiveness of the tactic or tactics selected, or more comprehensively, the integration of a number of tactics into a management program, or Integrated Pest Management (IPM) system.

Tactics for tick suppression can be selected to target either the on-host portion of the life cycle, the off-host portion of the life cycle, or both.

From the backyard to large pastures or rangeland, the selection and implementation of tactics will vary depending on the premise-type and animals involved, but the principles remain the same.

Tactics designed to minimize the risk of introducing ticks onto your property and which offer safe and effective methods of tick control include:

  • Movement of infested hosts facilitates the movement of ticks from one location to another. Thus, vigilance in the detection of ticks on host animals and application of tick removal or on animal control tactics can prevent introductions into your home, yard, kennels, stables or pasture
  • Inspection of yourself, companion animals, and production animals followed by appropriate action is essential to prevent introductions.
  • Design and manage landscape vegetation close to living spaces to minimize wildlife recruitment and tick habitat.

Additional non-chemical tactics to reduce the risk of tick introduction and establishment in the home environment include:

  • Use fencing as needed to exclude or restrict access by stray dogs, cats, and wildlife species (e.g. deer, coyotes, raccoons, feral swine, and furbearers) onto home premises, especially when companion animals are present. Monitor fencing perimeters for breaches (e.g. gaps or holes from animal digging) that may provide wildlife egress into backyard areas.
  • Restrict the use of landscaping plants around the home to those types that do not attract deer or other wild browsers (e.g. birds, rabbits, etc.) or utilize additional fencing strategies (e.g. electric “hot” wire) to deter and exclude wildlife. Consider converting irrigated yard planting areas into native plants or more dry (xeric) landscapes. Xeriscapes provide less favorable micro-habitat for off-host tick survival and are “greener”, requiring less time, labor, water and consumable energy resources to maintain. For more information about plants and landscaping tips, contact your local Extension office. (http://www.extension.org)

Pet exposure to tick-infested leaf litter.

  • Feed outdoor pets and monitor consumption to ensure that all food is eaten by pets during daylight hours which discourages visitation by mice, rats, squirrels, birds, feral cats, opossums, raccoons and other potential wildlife tick hosts.
  • Likewise, keep bird feeders in open, bare ground areas away from pet kennels and bedding and away from the home and garage/storage shop entrances.

Removing, cleaning and treating pet bedding

  • Place swing sets and other playground equipment in an open yard areas away from potentially tick-infested woody vegetation and weeds. Maintain ground cover surrounding child activity areas; consider using pea gravel, recycled rubber pellets, or cedar chip mulches.
  • To facilitate soil drying, remove all leaf litter and other vegetative debris as it accumulates from yard and kennel areas. Surface desiccation of soil through exposure to sun and wind creates an unfavorable tick habitat.
  • Create and maintain a 3-4 ft vegetation-free border zone using mulching materials (mentioned above) around woodlot edges and landscape plantings in or adjacent to the yard.
  • Prune back overhead tree branches to increase the amount of sunlight reaching the ground to “solarize” the soil and reduce the survivability of ticks.
  • Regularly mow lawn grasses.
  • Consider using a steam cleaner/sprayer when disinfecting pet crates and kennel housings, paying particular attention to steaming cracks and crevices in concrete slabs or pavers of outdoor kennels and along home foundations where ticks may be hiding. Boiling water can also be poured along edges of slabs and into gaps around outdoor flooring to control any residual ticks.
  • Utilize non-toxic chemical alternatives in and around the home. If or when chemical control is required, treat pets or premises using the least toxic chemical response that will achieve acceptable control, especially when children are present. Successful control and management of ticks and other arthropod pests in the home environment usually requires repeated use of a combination of non-chemical and chemical treatment procedures (e.g. IPM) to achieve effective and lasting results.

Non-chemical tactics to help reduce the risk of tick introduction and establishment in livestock paddocks, pasturage, parks & recreational areas include:

Mechanical removal of brush

  • Use a tractor drawn shredder or walk behind sickle-type mower to remove brush and weeds that may provide safety for ticks. To effectively treat larger acreages, it may be more suitable to use a mechanical or hydraulic grubber or skid-steer loader to knock down woody vegetation, and a disk or cultivator implement to remove weeds and grasses to bare ground. Prime areas to cover include grounds adjacent to fence lines, barns or stables, paddocks, pastures, and any woodlot areas with livestock.

Root plow for brush control.

  • In paddocks and pastures with significant woodlot acreage, use solar/battery powered electric fencing to exclude livestock egress into wooded areas. Shaded woodlots provide ticks with prime survival habitat, and may often produce mast crops in fall (e.g. acorns from oak trees, elm achenes) that attract and focus both wildlife and livestock foragers. Tilled soil areas surrounding woodlots can be seeded with ryegrass, oats or wheat to provide green forage for livestock grazing and reduce time spent roaming wooded pasturage in search of food.

Vegetation management using prescribed fire

  • The timely use of prescribed fire (judiciously administered by experienced natural resource professionals) can effectively reduce and control populations of some ticks and other internal parasites. Slow moving prescribed burns (e.g. backfires) performed under adequate fuel loads and environmental conditions, generate temperatures sufficient to kill or physically damage ticks and other parasites on rangelands and improved pastures. The benefits of initial tick reduction extend beyond the acute impact of burning, as fire also removes the leaf litter, undergrowth, and shrubby hardwood vegetation rendering the soil-vegetation interface less hospitable for off-host tick survival. Prescribed fire also hastens nutrient recycling to soil microbes, improving the productivity of top soils and resulting in increased forage availability for grazing livestock.

Chemical treatments for the control of ticks on companion animals and the home environment include:

  • Control of ticks in and around the home requires attention and treatment of both the outdoor and indoor environments, as well as attention and treatment of resident dogs and cats. It is important to recognize there are risks associated with the use of pesticides in the home environment, including risks to children and companion animals. Further, home and pet owners need to recognize that some pesticides approved for use on dogs should not be used on cats. For example, products containing permethrin recommended for dogs should not be used on cats, and may be lethal. Apply products only in accordance with the label and safety instructions, or consult your veterinarian.

Spot-on acaricide treatment

  • For outdoor environments spray or dust borders, pet kennels, and pet resting areas with approved products formulated as a dust, a pre-formulated ready-to-use spray, or mixed and applied using a pump sprayer. Always read, understand, and follow all chemical product label instructions and safety precautions prior to opening and applying any chemical products in or around your home, or contact a certified pest management professional to provide these services.

  • Spray or dust yard borders and pet kennel areas with permethrin, either as a dust, a pre-formulated ready-to-use spray, or mixed and applied using a pump sprayer. Permethrin is a synthetic pyrethroid insecticide. Pyrethroid insecticides share a similar (neurotoxic) mode of action with pyrethrins (a mixture of natural insecticides derived from the flowerheads of some species of Chrysanthemum). Pyrethroid insecticides provide effective control of ticks and a variety of household arthropod pests. Like pyrethrins, most pyrethroids are relatively low in toxicity to humans and most other mammals and birds. For this reason, some pyrethroids are used regularly to treat pets, as well as human clothing, to kill and prevent ticks. Following application, pyrethroid insecticides provide good efficacy before breaking down safely in the environmentRemember to read, understand, and follow all chemical product label instructions and safety precautions prior to opening and applying any chemical products in or around your home, or contact a certified pest control operator (PCO) to provide these services.

Refer to chemical formulation tables for guidance to active ingredients, formulations, and application to dogs , cats , and home .

Chemical treatments for the control of ticks on livestock, equines, poultry, and premises:

  • The selection of tick control products requires several important considerations. The tables contained in this APP are intended to serve only as a guide to the commonly available active ingredients, formulations and applications for the control of ticks on animals. Factors that may influence selection of a product include whether the tick infestation is localized to the ears and/or head region, or is generalized to the body with ticks attached to the belly, legs, udder/scrotal, and tail-head areas. For example, several tick species prefer to attach to the ears, such as the Gulf Coast tick, and can be controlled with pesticide impregnated ear tags for cattle, however these products would obviously be inappropriate for horses thus an alternative application appropriate to these animals is indicated. Before purchasing any product, read the label carefully to determine whether the product is appropriate for the animal and for the tick infestation. Pay particular attention to all instructions for application and safety, and to any requirements for withdrawal periods associated with food animals. Use the product only in accordance with labeled and safety instructions.
  • The timely application of herbicides to remove unwanted or evasive woody and herbaceous vegetation effectively control the off-host survival of several tick life-stages. Hand or pump sprayers using selective herbicides are generally effective for home yard perimeters and spot treatments of undergrowth and brush. In rural or agricultural settings, pressure and boom sprayers on tractors or ATVs are commonly used to reduce brush and herbaceous vegetation in fields and pastures, and around barns, out-buildings, and fence-lines.

Aerial applications of herbicides for vegetation removal are typically very expensive, and are normally reserved for use in reducing over-story canopy on large acre tracts of forested woodlots, rangelands, and pasturage.

Commercial acaricide products are available with a variety of active ingredients formulated for specific applications to control ticks.

Be sure to read, understand, and follow all chemical product label instructions, recommendations, and safety precautions thoroughly prior to using any chemical application or treatment.

Spray-dip machine for livestock treatment.

Tables summarizing chemicals and formulations labeled for use in the control and management of ticks on livestock and companion animals, and for premise treatment of homes, yards, stables, pastures, rangeland, and recreational areas:

Cats (in/out doors):

Active ingredient Formulation(s) Application
Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate Spray (ready-to-use) For use on cats 12+ wks, bedding, and on nursing animals
Etofenprox Spot-on For kittens/cats 12 wks +
Fipronil Spot-on Spray (ready-to-use) Use monthly for best control Mist entire hair-coat until damp/wet
Pyrethrins Dip, Powder, Spot-on, Spray For kittens/cats 12 wks +
Selamectin Spot-on For kittens/cats 8 wks +
Tetrachlorvinphos Collar, Dip Avoid using on cats near children

Cattle (beef & dairy)

Active ingredient Formulation(s) Application
Abamectin Ear tag Beef & non-lactating dairy cattle
Amitraz Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Spray dip machine

Saturate skin w/2 gal. spray/animal

Spray/dip until skin is saturated

Chlorpyriphos Ear tag Beef & non-lactating dairy cattle
Coumaphos Dusting powder

Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Suspend dust bags where cows loaf

Beef & non-lactating dairy cattle

Beef & non-lactating dairy cattle

beta-Cyfluthrin Ear tag One tag in both ears for all cattle
Diazinon Ear tag Beef & non-lactating dairy cattle
Permethrin Aerosol spray

Backrubber Ear tag

Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Pour-on Spray (ready-to-use)

Spray onto ticks in/outside ear Keep applicator fully charged

One tag in both ears for all cattle

Wash udders before milking

Head, neck & along top-line No dilution required for use

Phosmet Emulsifiable concentrate spray Beef & non-lactating dairy cattle
Tetrachlorvinphos Emulsifiable concentrate spray Beef cattle & lactating dairy cattle
Wettable powder (spray) Beef cattle, spray ½-1 gal/animal
Zeta-cypermethrin Dusting powder Dust bags, shaker cans for all cattle

Dogs (in/out doors)

Active ingredient Formulation(s) Application
Amitraz Collar Avoid using on dogs near children
Dichlorvos Collar Avoid using on dogs near children
Dioctyl sodium sulfosuccinate Spray (ready-to-use) For use on dogs 12+ wks old, bedding, and nursing animals
Fipronil Spot-on

Spray (ready-to-use) Use monthly for best control

Mist entire hair-coat until damp/wet Permethrin Aerosol spray

Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Spray (ready-to-use) Spray directly onto ticks for control

For use on puppies/dogs 12 wks +

Use gloves; rub into coat/onto skin

For use on puppies/dogs 12 wks +

For use on puppies/dogs 7 wks +

Use gloves; wet hair-coat to skin Propoxur Collar Avoid using on dogs near children Pyrethrins Dip, Shampoo, Spray, Spot-on For use on puppies/dogs 12 wks + Selamectin Spot-on For puppies & dogs 6 wks + Tetrachlorvinphos Collar Avoid using on dogs near children

Equids (horses, mules & donkeys)

Active ingredient Formulation(s) Application
Coumaphos Emulsifiable concentrate spray No horses destined for slaughter
Permethrin Aerosol spray

Dip (hand soak or sponge)

Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Wipe-on

Spray onto ticks in/outside ear

Keep applicator fully charged

Wet to skin; drip dry; avoid face

Spot treat back-tail-legs-mane-ears

Leg/blanket covering deterent

Safe for lactating mares and foals

Safe for foals older than 3 mo.

Spot treat legs, tail, mane & ears

Use mitt; don’t use on foals 1 mo.

Permethrin Aerosol spray

Dip (hand soak or sponge)

Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Spray (ready-to-use)

Spray onto ticks in/outside ear

Keep applicator fully charged

Wet fleece/hair-coat through to skin

Wet fleece/hair-coat through to skin

Repeat at 2 wk intervals/as needed

Head, neck, and along top-line

Spot treat; spray directly onto ticks

Zeta-cypermethrin Dusting powder Dust bags, gloves, and shaker cans

Swine

Active ingredient Formulation(s) Application
Permethrin Dip, sponge, spray No treatments 1 wk before shipping

Premises- Residential, Commercial, Recreational (homes, yards, kennels, parks, woodlots)

Active ingredient Formulation(s) Application
Bifenthrin Emulsifiable concentrate
spray

Granules

Lawns, patios, slabs, landscaping

Parks, recreation areas, woodlots

Carbaryl Dusting powder

Wettable powder (spray)

Perimeters of slabs, kennels, yards

Landscaping, turfgrass, woodlots

Cyfluthrin Aerosol spray (residual)

Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Foam

Homes, kennels, campgrounds

Kennels, cracks/crevices, flooring

Kennels, cracks/crevices, flooring

beta-Cyfluthrin Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Wettable powder (spray)

In/outdoors, pet kennels & housing

In/outdoors, kennels/housing, paths

lambda-Cyhalothrin Aerosol spray

Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Hose end sprayer (pre-mixed)

Pre-measured tablets

Crack/crevice/floor spot treatment

Kennels, runs, yards & perimeters

Home, kennel, & yard perimeters

Apply to lawn & yard perimeters

Kennels, runs, yards, & vegetation

Cypermethrin Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Wettable powder (spray)

Building perimeters, porches, lawns

Baseboards, slabs, kennel floors

Deltamethrin Suspended concentrate (spray)

Granules

Baseboards, cracks, crevices

Shaker can around dwellings

Perimeter broadcast a 5-10 ft swath

Esfenvalerate Residual spray concentrate Pet quarters/beds, cracks/crevices
Fipronil Emulsifiable concentrate spray Kennels, runs, yards, & vegetation
Imidocloprid Emulsifiable concentrate spray Tall grass & vegetation along paths
Methoprene Aerosol spray Carpets, floors, & pet resting areas
Permethrin Aerosol spray

Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Squeeze bottle

Spray directly onto ticks in/outside

Kennels, dog houses, and bedding

Kennels, housing, yards, perimeters

Spray directly onto ticks in/outside

Apply directly onto clothing

Propoxur Aerosol spray Cracks/crevices in homes, kennels, vet clinics, and warehouses
Pyrethrins Aerosol spray

Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Fogger/bomb

Floors, baseboards, pet bedding

Homes, kennels, cracks & crevices

Residential yards, warehouses

Combine use w/ on-animal control

Pyriproxyfen Emulsifiable concentrate spray Dry prior to access by humans/pets
Tetrachlorvinphos Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Wettable powder (spray)

Kennels, parks, recreational areas

Kennels, yards, recreational areas

Zeta-cypermethrin Dusting powder Dust dog kennels and housings

Top

Premises- Agricultural (barns, stables, paddocks, feedlots, pasturage & rangelands)

All surfaces in poultry housings

Dairy barn, poultry house, swine barn walls, floors, cracks/crevices

© Copyright 2011 The Texas A&M University System

tickapp.tamu.edu

Grape Tick: Effective Control Methods

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If you live in a place that has ticks, you know what a plague they can be during the summer. Here in Maine, we currently have the highest number of cases of Lymes disease in the country. That’s a scary thing to have just outside your door! While there are always commercial products we can use to help keep ticks at bay, here at Pine State DIY, we like to do things the natural way whenever possible.

Now that tick season is in full effect, Joshua and I have been trying out different ways to keep our yards clear of the tiny menace. While we haven’t tried every entry on this list, I do think they are all worth exploring. It may also be worth trying a few of these at a time if you want to make sure your yard stays truly free of ticks.

I hope this list will help keep you and your family protected when you’re out in the yard this summer. Let me know in the comments if you have any other great natural tick control options!

Cedar Oil

Cedar oil comes from, you guessed it, cedar trees. But not just cedar trees, any tree that has needles and pine cones. It has been used for thousands of years because of it’s anti-bacterial properties and because it keeps bugs of all kinds away. Cedar oil kills not only ticks but also fleas and mosquitos (who doesn’t want to keep those three far away?). But it also repels all manner of bugs, making it a perfect treatment for your yard this summer.

Cedar oil is safe for your kids and your pets. Get some of the straight essential oil and dilute with water or purchase a product like Cedarcide. Cedarside is made with only a few natural ingredients and comes already diluted perfectly for your yard. Spray the entire yard with it and redo after the recommended time period to see your yard clear of ticks for the summer.

Cedar oil is also safe enough to be used as a topical bug repellent. Keep a small spray bottle of it diluted with water around and be sure to spray yourself down before going outside. You’ll notice that bugs of all kinds stay clear of you!

Neem Oil

Neem oil won’t kill ticks, but it is an effective way of keeping them at bay. It comes from a shade tree commonly found in Asian and India, usually from its seeds. It’s used for many things, but widely known as a very effective pesticide. It won’t help kill adult ticks if they’re already on you, but it will keep them away if you treat your lawn and yourself with it. Interestingly, it will kill tick eggs and stop the female ticks from laying fertilized eggs so while it doesn’t kill, it does disrupt tick’s lifecycle. As a bonus, neem oil is also great at repelling other pests, like mosquitos and ants, so it’s perfect for use anywhere on your lawn and in your garden.

Like cedar oil, neem is an essential oil, so you can buy it in its pure form and dilute it. You can also buy it in a pre-mixed formula, perfect for spraying your lawn. Safer Brand Neem Oil Concentrate is available in large quantities so you can cover your whole lawn and garden at once. Bonus, it’s also a fungicide!

Diatomaceous Earth

Diatomaceous earth is safe for pets and humans but deadly for ticks and other bugs. What just looks and feels like dirt to us, is actually tiny sharp objects that pierce the bugs and cause them to dehydrate to death. Kind of a strange way to kill bugs? Yes, but it works!

The way diatomaceous earth works, however, means that the ticks have to actually come in contact with it in order for it to work. So, in order for diatomaceous earth to work completely on its own, you’d have to cover every inch of your yard with it. Since this is probably not an option for you, I would recommend creating a barrier around your yard using diatomaceous earth and then using one of the other options on this list to supplement your yards protection. An especially good place to have diatomaceous earth is in between any wooded areas and your lawn to help keep ticks from coming in in the first place. Also, be aware that you’ll probably have to reapply throughout the summer.

Eucalyptus Oil

Eucalyptus oil is another essential oil that is excellent at keeping away ticks. Because it usually comes in small bottles, it isn’t the best for spraying the yard. However, you can mix it with vinegar in larger amounts and spray it on your property. The best way to use it is to dilute it with water and keep it in a spray bottle. You’ll enjoy the thick, earthy smell of the essential oil and you’ll have a very effective tick repellent to spray on yourself. As a bonus, it’s also excellent at repelling mosquitos! Just be sure not to use it without diluting it and it’s highly concentrated and could cause irritation if applied directly.

Garlic Spray

In my opinion, garlic is good in any situation (especially dinner) but it turns out my favorite spice is also an incredible bug repellent. Ticks and other bugs hate both the smell and the taste of garlic. So, what are you supposed to do, grow a bunch of garlic? Well, you could and it would definitely help. Or you could pick up some garlic essential oil. You could also make your own garlic oil if you’re so inclined.

Like the other essential oils on this list, garlic essential oil should be diluted with water, or oil, vinegar. However, you prefer to dilute essential oils will do. Garlic oil can seriously irritate your skin, so I would recommend just using this to spray your yard with. If you’re looking for a quicker or easier solution, you can purchase Garlic Barrier which lasts 3-4 weeks and isn’t harmful to your kids or animals.

Tick Tubes

If you’ve never heard of tick tubes, the idea behind them is going to blow your mind a little. See, it turns out that ticks really like to attach themselves to mice and other small rodents. I mean they REALLY love mice. The idea behind a tick tube is that you stuff cotton bits, like cotton balls or dryer lint, into a tube (toilet paper tubes work great). You also mix something called permethrin in with the lint. Permethrin is an insecticide that will kill the ticks, but not harm the mice. The mice take the fluff that you left in the tubes to build their nests. The ticks come in contact with the insecticide and die and the mice are left unscathed.

You can find a lot of really great tutorial online to make tick tubes yourself or you could buy them. Thermacell and Eco Health Damminix are easy to find and require nothing more from you than placing them in your yard. Tick tubes are super effective for keeping the tick population down and used in conjunction with some of the other entries on this list and you might never see a tick in your yard again.

Plant Something

If you’re looking to add some landscaping to your yard, consider planting something that will help keep ticks at bay. Some of them are a little more obvious, garlic and eucalyptus, for instance, have both already made the list. But there are a number of other plants that will help keep your yard clear of pests this summer. Try planting some rose geranium, citronella, lemongrass, lavender, rosemary, sage, catnip, pennyroyal, or mint near where you spend most of your time outside in the summer. Since you can’t cover your entire lawn in specialty plants, concentrating them near your porch or patio will help keep ticks away from the areas you’re most likely to be. Keep in mind that some of these plants might be toxic for pets so you’ll want to check before you plant them.

Chickens

If you are thinking about controlling ticks in the long term, you might want to consider raising chickens. Chickens LOVE eating ticks because, as bugs go, they are pretty slow moving and easy for big birds like chickens to catch. And that’s good news for your yard. While chickens probably aren’t the end all be all for tick control, they can be a really effective part of your natural tick control efforts. Plus, you’ll have a bevy of fresh eggs every morning, I call that a win-win.

Landscaping

Natural insecticides are great, but one of the best things you can do to keep ticks away is to destroy their habitat. You probably already know that ticks love long grass, but did you also know that they love areas where anything is piled up? You should remove branches and leaf piles from your yard and be sure to keep your grass cut short. Basically, ticks won’t thrive anywhere where it is warm and dry. Also, when you go out, be sure to wear light colored clothing. It will be easier to spot ticks on you than if you’re wearing dark clothing. And always remember to check yourself for ticks when you come in from outside.

Controlling ticks in your yard can be a daunting task, but there are lots of ways to go about it. I hope this list has helped you feel confident about tackling your tick problem. Have you tried one of these methods? Have you tried something else? Let me know how it worked out in the comments!

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Active ingredient Formulation(s) Application
Bifenthrin Emulsifiable concentrate
spray

Granules

Barns, out-buildings, fence rows

Out-buildings, fence-lines

Carbaryl Wettable powder (spray) Poultry cages, housings, and roosts, pasturage, and rangelands
Cyfluthrin Emulsifiable concentrate spray Cattle/swine barns, poultry houses
beta-Cyfluthrin Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Wettable powder (spray)

Livestock & poultry housings

Livestock/poultry/
utility buildings

Cypermethrin Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Wettable powder (spray)

Out-building perimeters

Out-building perimeters

Permethrin Aerosol spray

Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Squeeze bottle

Caging, floors, cracks/crevices

Shelter housing, feedlots, paddocks

Spot treatment of
barns & stables

Recharge protective equine covers

Pyrethrins Dusting powder

Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Animal quarters cracks/crevices

Barns, poultry and swine houses

Tetrachlorvinphos Emulsifiable concentrate spray

Wettable powder (spray)