How To Get Rid of Bandicoot Rats in India, Rentokil Pest Control

How to get rid of bandicoot rats

If action is not taken to rid your home and/or garden of Bandicoot rats, they will soon take over! A wide range of DIY products are available in stores for dealing with bandicoot rats in low risk areas, but we recommend treatment by one of our service technicians for bandicoot rat activity in living areas of your home or close proximity to your home.

Getting rid of rats with Rentokil PCI

While amateur DIY products are a cost effective way to control bandicoot rat problems in low risk areas, professional pest control is required for high risk areas, more established bandicoot colonies or where there is a repeated infestation. Rentokil PCI service technicians provide highly targeted treatment to deal with any bandicoot rat problem and will advise on how to keep your home free of bandicoot rats in the future.
Rentokil PCI offers a call-out service to deal with bandicoot rats and other pest problems in the home. Our service is fast, effective and offers the highest level of safety for your family and pets.

Call Rentokil PCI today on 1800-212-212-5 for an expert inspection. Alternatively, you can drop us an enquiry online.

www.rentokil-pestcontrolindia.com

How to deal with earthen rats in the garden or cottage?

Anonymous

We have rats coming into our yard from our neighbor’s backyard, where we believe they are living in the forest of ivy. What should we do?

We are hesitant to put out snap traps (don’t want to kill or injure other critters) and/or poison bait. We learned from an exterminator that the most effective poison for rats is at the mouths of their warrens; they get coated in it and lick it off, and other animals aren’t exposed. However, since the warrens are (a) not on our property and (b) totally covered in ivy, this doesn’t seem like an easy solution.

I am thinking of calling the neighbor and saying I’d like to hire a crew to remove the ivy, offering to split the cost (he’s been open to this type of thing in the past, when we sprayed his cherry trees for tent caterpillars that were dropping entirely in our yard; he has a double lot so the border is much closer to our house than to his). If the ivy were cleared, the property could be treated for rats and then mulch could be applied under the trees where the ivy now is.

Does anybody have any better idea?

Anonymous

Anonymous

Anonymous

Anonymous

Anonymous

where do you live?

If it is DC you absolutely contact The Department of Health Rodent Control and Enforcement — at 202-727-1000 to report rodent complaints.

I have been very successful in using them when 2 neighbors had created environments so that we had rat problem in our back yard.

Anonymous

Anonymous

this helped us out A LOT when a nearby house was torn down and all of the rats fled:

Anonymous

Anonymous wrote: We have rats coming into our yard from our neighbor’s backyard, where we believe they are living in the forest of ivy. What should we do?

We are hesitant to put out snap traps (don’t want to kill or injure other critters) and/or poison bait. We learned from an exterminator that the most effective poison for rats is at the mouths of their warrens; they get coated in it and lick it off, and other animals aren’t exposed. However, since the warrens are (a) not on our property and (b) totally covered in ivy, this doesn’t seem like an easy solution.

I am thinking of calling the neighbor and saying I’d like to hire a crew to remove the ivy, offering to split the cost (he’s been open to this type of thing in the past, when we sprayed his cherry trees for tent caterpillars that were dropping entirely in our yard; he has a double lot so the border is much closer to our house than to his). If the ivy were cleared, the property could be treated for rats and then mulch could be applied under the trees where the ivy now is.

Does anybody have any better idea?

Cutting back ivy is not going to take care of your rat problem at this point. My neighbor and I have no ivy, but we still had a big rat problem for a while. We paid nearly $1000 for rat control, plus the city put out its own traps and poison. Only then did we eliminate the rats. If we don’t keep up these efforts, they come back.

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Poison bait is put into locked boxes. Dogs and cats can’t get into them. You’ll see them all over DC, on public and private property. Why don’t you want to use them?

Anonymous

Anonymous

Anonymous wrote: We have rats coming into our yard from our neighbor’s backyard, where we believe they are living in the forest of ivy. What should we do?

Poison bait is put into locked boxes. Dogs and cats can’t get into them. You’ll see them all over DC, on public and private property. Why don’t you want to use them?

Yep, they are called rat traps. Use them.

Anonymous

We have the same problem. Our neighbors so kindly pile up junk in back of their shed, so that it is next to our yard. We had an exterminator come over and tell us that the rats most likley are coming from the pile of junk. Unfortuantly we’ve already had issues with this neighbor, and I’m pretty sure they won’t do anything (they are related to two other neighbors on our block, so I’m really hesitant to cause problems).

We put the locked bait traps out and haven’t seen any since. We have a dog and a kid (so I was worried), but they leave them alone.

If we see a resurgance, I will try to work with the neighbor.

Anonymous

OP, I think it’s very generous of you to offer to split the cost. If you want to do that I say go for it. Otherwise, call the pest control number a PP offered. GL!

Anonymous

All you have to do is call your local health dept. Rats are vermin and against health code regulations.

www.dcurbanmom.com

How to get rid of mice in the house WITHOUT using traps or poisons

MICE in your home can cause a variety of problems, from damaging walls to giving you salmonella. But there’s a simple way to show rodents the door without having to resort to traps or poisons.

How to get rid of mice in the house: Traps and poison aren’t the only answers

The house mouse ranges between 60-90mm — the tail an additional 100mm — weighs less than 25g, and is light brown and grey in colour.

Their presence is usually detected from their dark-coloured droppings and damage to stored foods in the larder, packaging or woodwork.

Mouse nests are often built inside houses, often in places such as roof spaces, under floors or in wall cavities, especially during winter.

And their tiny agile bodies enable them to squeeze through cracks as small as 5mm, which is how they can gain access into your home.

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How to get rid of mice in the house: Mice have been known to spread some nasty diseases to humans

Mice have been known to spread some nasty diseases to humans such as Salmonella, which can cause food poisoning.

Another sign of their presence is they can often be heard running about at night, in search of food.

Why are mice in the house a problem?

Mice have been known to spread some nasty diseases to humans such as Salmonella, which can cause food poisoning.

They’ve also been known to gnaw electric cables, water and gas pipes, packaging and woodwork, causing serious damage.

Common infestations in the home and how to get rid of them

Common infestations in the home from ants to black mould and how to get rid of them.

Mice — If you don’t want to use mousetraps, try using peppermint and cat litter as a deterrent

So how do you get rid of mice?

The British Pest Control Association says it’s important to get rid of mice quickly, as mice are adaptable, highly mobile and breed rapidly.

As well as recommending contacting a professional pest control company for any mouse infestation, the organisation says you can carry out the work yourself and buy amateur use poisons and traps from a hardware store or garden centre.

But for those who prefer not to use this method, there is an alternative which could help solve the problem.

How to get rid of mice in the house: Proofing all means of entry as much possible will help

On its website, the BPCA says: “Proofing all means of entry as much possible will help to prevent entry.

“Block holes with wire wool embedded in quick-setting cement, and fit met metal strips to doors to prevent mice from entering.”

It also suggests three prevention methods.

  • Eliminate any harbourage points such as sealing gaps around pipes and under sheds.
  • Remove potential nesting sites by keeping yards and gardens clean and tidy, by cutting back overgrown areas and clearing any piles of wood/debris.
  • Cover any household waste where mice can get access to it, close dustbin lids and cover compost heaps.

www.express.co.uk

How to deal with earthen rats in the garden or cottage?

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Rats are among planet Earth’s ultimate survivor species. They scavenge, hunt, hide, possess remarkable intelligence and are a very important part of the natural habitat. Since the dawn of mankind, the rat population has been booming all over the world because humans provide the best living conditions for the rodents. Because of that, property owners are in a great need of pest control once they realize they have a rat infestation.

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Norwegian rat

The brown rat (also called Norwegian rat) is the most common household rodent in the entire world. It grows up to 40 cm in length and its tail is usually shorter than its body. They produce between 5 and 10 rat babies per litter and have between 3 and 6 litters a year. The young reach sexual maturity about 10 weeks after birth.

Black rat

The black rat is smaller than the brown rat, it grows no more than 25 cm in length. However, its tail is longer than its body. It has a pointed nose, large ears and a slender body. Just like the brown rat, it produces between 5 and 10 baby rats per litter and between 3 and 6 litters a year. The young reach sexual maturity when they are 10 weeks old. The black rat climbs a lot, doesn’t like to burrow and it’s rarely found outdoors. It eats less than the brown rat.

Habitat

Despite the brown rat being called a Norway rat in some parts of the world, it does not originate from Norway. It was introduced in the Nordic country after the name Rattus Norvegicus was already popularised. Scientists speculate the Norway rat originates from China or Eastern Mongolia. During the Middle Ages, they spread to the other parts of the world.

The brown rat is cosmopolitan and lives on every continent. Antarctica was declared rat-free in 2012 when the population of brown rats on Rat island was eradicated. They were introduced to the island after a Japanese shipwrecked nearby. There are several other rat-free zones in the World, namely Iceland and Alberta, Canada.

As an omnivore, the Norway rat has a rich diet. It consists of but is not limited to, cereals, seeds, grains, nuts, meat, pet food, eggs, dairy products, and even chocolate. There are just a few foods they avoid—raw beets, raw celery, and peaches. Rats get their food from both outdoors and indoors locations.

Urban tales of rats preying on cats and dogs are exaggerated. Although they are omnivores, they are not keen on hunting. Rats are scavengers and will attack only when starving. However, it is not unlikely for a rat to attack and potentially kill a dog or a cat in self-defence.

Behaviour

  • Rats are social animals and live in colonies. A wild rat colony can number in the hundreds. It is rare for Norway rats to nest indoors. They prefer underground burrows from where they enter buildings in search of food, for instance, your garage.
  • They are nocturnal and rarely go outside in the daytime. Unlike what the majority of people believe, they are not aggressive and prefer to shy away rather than engage in a battle. Yet when threatened, they become vicious fighters.
  • Rats reproduce rapidly. A rat litter consists of up to 24 pups. Their pregnancy is just 28 days long.
  • The Norway rat can jump up to 70cm and can swim over long distances.
  • They have an acute smell and hearing which allows them to sense any disturbance. However, they are colour-blind and have poor vision.

Health Hazards

Rats are well-known disease vectors and carry numerous infectious pathogens. The list includes serious illnesses such as typhus, Weil’s disease, rat-bite fever, Q fever and leptospirosis. They contaminate food and water sources with saliva, droppings and urine.

The disease most commonly associated with rats—plague—is not carried by Norway rats. It is transmitted by fleas leaving an infected black rat and attacking a man. Black rats are now extinct in the UK but can be found throughout Europe. They were driven out of Britain by the Norway rat. Black rats also spread Hantaviruses.

However, rats are one of the few mammals not known to spread rabies. Although there are incidental reports of rats infected by the disease, there are no known cases of rat-to-human rabies infection. Rats are also extremely resistant to the rabies virus.

Damages

Norway rats cause huge harm to the world economy. They cause structural damage to a building and can cause a fire by chewing on a cable. They can also destroy flood defences, bridges and security fences.

Rats feed on wheat and rye. Tons of harvest are destroyed each year due to disease contamination, caused by them. They also infect domesticated animals.

Signs of rats

  • Chewed items – Like mice, rats have incisors which never stop growing. Thus they need to chew onto something hard on a regular basis – cables, woods, even pipes.
  • Droppings – the shape and size of black olives. Unlike mice, rats are a bit more protective, so they have better hiding skills and don’t want to be noticed. If you hear noises, see chewed cables, but don’t find droppings, it’s probably rats, not mice.
    Read more: How to identify rat droppings?
  • Smears – rats have poor sight, that’s why they follow the same routes while moving. Constant moving on the same tracks will leave dark marks on surfaces – that’s called smears.
  • Noises – rats can climb walls, so you might hear scratching noises behind walls.
  • Footprints – you might see footprints on dusty places (basements, attics). Like any other animal, rats leave their prints.
    Read more: Signs of a rat infestation.
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Rat prevention: How to Deter Rats

Prevention is the best medicine. If you don’t have rats right now, or if you just managed to remove the nightmare form your house, you need to make sure that no rodent enters your property again. To do this, there are a few important steps to follow.

  • Fill holes and gaps in your property structure. The most common reason people get a rat infestation is holes and cracks in the walls or ceiling. Blocking the nasty critters’ way in is the first and most important step in rat prevention.
  • Get a pet. A cat or a dog won’t be useful if you have a full-blown infestation, but it’s true that they are a good prevention method. Rats wouldn’t dare to nest in a property where their predators lurk.
    Read more: Where do rats nest?
  • Keep your home clean. Cleaning up a house doesn’t simply mean to sweep every day. Rats will not come knocking on your door, just because there’s some dust. Like any animal, they will come, if there is food laying around. Don’t leave uneaten food on the table, or dirty dishes in the sink overnight. Pet food is also a big attractor, and so is the garbage bin.
    Read more: How to prevent a rat infestation?How to get rid of rats?

How to deal with rats inside your home

Rat control must focus not only on exterminating the population but on preventing the re-entry of rodents inside your property. There are several different methods of rats control.

1. Poison is the most effective at killing rats.

2. With traps, there is no risk of dead rats in hidden locations. In order for a trap to be effective, it must be placed on the path of the rats.

3. Another important aspect of rat control is preventing future access. All points of entry must be sealed to avoid re-infestation. These include holes in the walls and attic, gutters, pipes, structural gaps, and even roof tile intersections.

www.fantasticpestcontrol.co.uk

How to deal with earthen rats in the garden or cottage?

An agricultural pest known asthe name «earthen rat», in fact refers to the family of mice-Vole and is its largest representative. Initially, the earthen rats were found only in the southern regions, but gradually migrated to the north. Now it occupies the territory of the temperate climatic belt almost to the border with the subarctic zone.

This rodent, having a body size of up to twenty-fivecentimeters, was mistakenly ranked in rats. But in all habits, this is a real vole, except that the vole-overgrowth. The earth rat eats everything that grows, giving preference, naturally, to cultivated plants, as more nutritious and juicy. If it appears on your site, you will see it on the cleanly destroyed beds. Onions, dill? Yes easily. Roots? Good too. What is there — a flower bed? She and the flower garden will not disdain. According to the testimony of gardeners whose plots were subjected to the invasion of this rodent, the earth rat for some reason prefers saffron, which it mows as well as lawn mowers.

The largest specimens of the earth rat have a mass of up to half a kilogram, and their hair is rather thick and long. Under favorable conditions, the rodent multiplies very quickly. The female brings offspring up to three times a year,and in one litter there are three or five cubs each. The kids of the earth rat are very bright creatures, and a month after they are born they leave the parent, starting an independent life.

The earth rat leads mainly undergrounda way of life, preferring to settle in river valleys and on the shores of natural and artificial reservoirs. As a rule, it does not penetrate the city, as the real gray rats who «stake out» the territory chase the weaker aliens.

Struggle with earth rats goes on differentdirections. This is the application of traditional poisons, as well as more modern, sophisticated methods. In order to drive away uninvited guests, a method is used that is successfully used against other underground pests — moles. This is the use of ultrasonic scarers. On the site in a certain order, several emitters are installed (the installation instruction is attached to the device), and after a short time the mole or earth rat leaves to eat the field plants, leaving your site alone.

Some to combat these rodents usefox terriers. However, dogbreeding is unlikely to give a 100% result, the earth rat is too cunning. The struggle with it made some gardeners use very simple, but, according to the inventors, very effective methods. In the chessboard in a staggered order four to six meters, pieces of fittings length of fifty to seventy centimeters are clogged, and tin cans from beer or other beverages are put on them. In the wind they start to rattle, and from this sound rats supposedly leave the territory.

Ways to deal with these giant voles exist enough to choose the one that will suit you most and will be more effective.

luciafontaines.com

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