How To Get Rid Of Raccoons Under Shed

Raccoons living under deck or shed

A raccoon living under a deck or shed from January to September should ALWAYS be assumed to be a mother with babies. Be careful, as you don’t want to orphan the baby raccoons. Raccoons are excellent mothers and will move their babies to a new den site when frightened, but evicting a mother raccoon always runs the risk that she might abandon or become separated from her babies.

What to do if a raccoon is living under a deck or shed

Be patient with a mother raccoon

Your first option is to do nothing at all. Raccoons typically live in underground dens for short periods. Raccoon babies are independent by the end of summer, when they leave the den and disperse from their family groups. Raccoon mothers also commonly move their babies between den sites during the nesting season, so she may leave on her own. If you can wait until the babies are grown and/or have left, you can then close off the access point to prevent other raccoons from using the deck or shed as a den in the future.

Humane harassment

The mother raccoon is living under the deck or shed because it’s a dark, quiet, safe place for her and her babies. If you make the area not dark, not quiet, and not safe (using light, sound, and smell) the raccoon can be convinced to leave your property and take her babies with her. All harassment techniques should be placed as close as possible to the den entrance, so the mother raccoon can’t ignore them when she comes and goes.

Light

Place a bright light at the den entrance, either inside or outside. Make sure it’s fire-safe. Raccoons are nocturnal, and don’t like bright lights in their homes. An outdoor spotlight or a mechanic’s light should do the trick.

Sound

Tune a radio to a talk station and place it near the den entrance. Music doesn’t mean anything to raccoons, but the sound of human voices is threatening to them. The radio should be turned up as loud as you can stand it without annoying your human neighbours.

Smell

Soak some rags in Apple Cider Vinegar or ammonia, and put them in a plastic bag. Poke holes in the bag to let the smell escape, and hang it next to the den entrance. You can us dirty kitty litter in a plastic bag the same way. Scent deterrents are least effective with raccoons, but can help when used in combination with light and sound methods.

Patience and persistence

Keep all of the above going for at least 3 days and 3 nights. You’ve got to be persistent to convince the raccoon to leave.

Paper Test

When you think the raccoon is gone, you want to make sure with a paper test: either stuff the entrance with balled up newspaper, or tape a double sheet of newspaper over the hole. Wait another 3 days and nights. If the paper is still in place, and you don’t hear anything under the deck or shed, do a visual inspection to make sure the animals are gone. Temporarily patch the hole with ¼” wire mesh until you can do a more permanent repair.

Excluding raccoons and other animals from under sheds/decks

To permanently exclude raccoons or other animals from under sheds or decks, first dig a 12”x12” trench around the shed or deck, then secure a piece of ¼” wire mesh along the bottom of the whole structure. Angle the mesh straight down into the ground for 8”-12”, and then bend it outward (away from the shed walls) at a 90 degree angle to create an “L” shape. Refill the trench. Make sure any animals already living under the shed or deck have left or been evicted first!

See also:  How To Get Rid Of Raccoons Naturally From Your Yard

What NOT to do

Live trapping

Trapping and relocating a raccoon might seem like the “humane” option, but it isn’t. Relocated raccoons don’t tend to survive when they’re moved off of their home territory. Relocated mother raccoons leave behind babies who will die without a mother to care for them. A mother raccoon relocated with her babies will be so frightened she will abandon them when faced with a new, unknown territory. In Ontario, it is illegal to relocate any wild animal more than 1km from where it was found.

One-way doors

Many humane removal companies will recommend putting up one-way doors so the raccoon can get out but not get back in. One-way doors are a good option between October and December, when tiny baby raccoons are unlikely. Between January and September, one-way doors can exclude the mother raccoon and leave tiny baby raccoons trapped inside. If they are too young to follow their mother, the babies will starve inside without her care. Separated from her babies, a mother raccoon will cause major damage to property as she tries desperately to get back to them. Make sure the baby raccoons are old enough to be mobile and following their mother before installing a one-way door.

Animal Removal Companies

Sometimes the best and easiest way to get a raccoon out of an attic is to hire a company to do it for you. Wildlife removal companies are not well monitored or licensed, so it is up to you to ask questions about a company’s practices before hiring them. Consult our guidelines for choosing a removal company.

www.torontowildlifecentre.com

How do I get rid of a Raccoon living under my shed without killing it?

We noticed a Raccoon living under my shed for about 3 days now. Today it left and my mom put 5 pound rocks in front of the opening under the shed. Is this the right thing to do? If not what should I do without killing the Raccoon?

It also scares me when I’m on my trampoline practicing gymnastics at night staring at me.

It knocked over our garbage can, opened the lid, and ate the extra food we had in there

6 Answers

If it has come for easy meals, which they will do, make sure your garbage cans are tied up tight. Remove all pet food before evening. Take away the «accidental» food sources. She was probably looking for a place to nest up. No harm done, and she can go on and find another place.

They normally are not aggressive, but in urban areas they have lost the fear of humans and become garbage raiders. They are known to carry a nasty roundworm in their feces that can cause a lot of health problems in humans. They are carriers of rabies in some areas of the US, along with bats, foxes and skunks. They spread it through their bites. This does not mean they all actually have rabies, only that the disease has spread among certain areas and their corresponding geographical populations.

answers.yahoo.com

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Raccoons (Procyon lotor) may look cute from a distance, but they quickly become unwanted pests when you spot signs of them in your yard. They carry diseases and parasites, and can pose a threat, especially to dogs and small children, if cornered. These animals have adapted well to urban and suburban environments, readily building dens under decks or outbuildings as well as in outbuildings where they can gain access. Raccoons can fit through openings as small as 4 to 6 inches in diameter, and locate weaknesses in fencing or other materials using hand-like front paws to enlarge holes or pry materials back, so securely installing strong materials is important.

See also:  Get Racoon Out Of Attic

Dig a trench 6 inches deep and at least 12 inches wide around the perimeter of the shed.

Bend the bottom of the galvanized wire mesh so the material has an «L» shape, with the bottom 12 inches fitting against the bottom of the trench. The wire mesh must be buried 6 inches deep, have a bottom edge that extends 12 inches outward to block digging raccoons, and extend up to solid wood or other solid material on the shed, covering all openings. Where multiple rolls or pieces of galvanized wire mesh are required, overlap pieces by at least 1 foot.

Secure the top of the wire mesh to the shed with heavy-duty staples, and a staple gun or screws with fender washers larger than the mesh openings. Space these fasteners every few feet and wherever multiple sections of wire mesh meet so that the material is held tightly against the shed, and raccoons will not be able to pull it down or create openings at the top to fit through.

Cover the portion of the wire mesh that is in the bottom of the trench with soil, and pack it down with your feet or a hand tamp.

Things Needed

  • Work gloves
  • Mattocks or shovel
  • Galvanized wire mesh with 1/3- or 1/2-inch openings
  • Wire cutters
  • Heavy-duty staples
  • Staple gun
  • Drill
  • Screws
  • Fender washers

Warnings

  • Call your local utility companies before digging around the shed to mark the location of any buried utilities.
  • Unless you are completely certain no raccoons or other animals are under the shed when you install the wire mesh, leave an opening on one side. Cover this opening with newspaper or sticks an animal could easily knock down, or spread flour over the ground and make sure these materials remain intact for at least a few days before sealing the remaining opening.
  • Use staples, rather than screws and washers, to secure the wire mesh at the top if you plan to install trim over the top of the material.
  • The galvanized wire mesh may look unattractive, but you can improve its appearance using spray paint, if desired, or install a decorative lattice over it.

References

  • UC IPM Online: Raccoons
  • Utah State University Cooperative Extension: Raccoons
  • The Skunk Whisperer: Using Hardware Cloth As A Wildlife Barrier For Proactive Prevention

Photo Credits

  • Hemera Technologies/Photos.com/Getty Images

About the Author

Angela Ryczkowski is a professional writer who has served as a greenhouse manager and certified wildland firefighter. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in urban and regional studies.

homeguides.sfgate.com

Raccoons living in shed or garage

A raccoon living in a shed or garage from January to September should ALWAYS be assumed to be a mother with babies. Be careful, as you don’t want to orphan the baby raccoons. Raccoons are excellent mothers and will move their babies to a new den site when frightened, but evicting a mother raccoon always runs the risk that she might abandon or become separated from her babies.

What to do if a raccoon is living in the shed or garage

Be patient with a mother raccoon

Your first option is to do nothing at all. Raccoons typically use sheds or garages as dens for short periods. Raccoon babies are independent by the end of summer, when they leave the den and disperse from their family groups. Raccoon mothers also commonly move their babies between den sites during the nesting season, so the raccoon may move her babies on her own. If you can wait until the babies are grown and/or have left, you can then close off the access point to prevent other raccoons from using the shed or garage as a den in the future.

In our experience, a raccoon mother whose shed or garage den has been discovered is usually frightened enough to move her babies within 48 hrs with no other intervention.

See also:  What'S Raccoon Poop Look Like

Humane harassment

The mother raccoon is living in the shed or garage because it’s a dark, quiet, safe place for her and her babies. If you make the shed or garage not dark, not quiet, and not safe using light, sound, and smell, the raccoon can be convinced to leave your shed or garage and take her babies with her. All harassment techniques should be placed as close as possible to the den entrance, so the mother raccoon can’t ignore them when she comes and goes.

Light

Turn on as many lights as you can in the shed or garage. Make sure they’re fire-safe, especially if you have to use extension cords. Raccoons are nocturnal, and don’t like bright lights in their homes. An outdoor spotlight or a mechanic’s light should do the trick. In a small shed or garage, it may be enough to leave the lights on inside.

Sound

Tune a radio to a talk station and place it near the den entrance. Music doesn’t mean anything to raccoons, but the sound of human voices is threatening to them. The radio should be turned up as loud as you can stand it without annoying your human neighbours.

Smell

Soak some rags in Apple Cider Vinegar or ammonia, and put them in a plastic bag. Poke holes in the bag to let the smell escape, and hang it next to the den entrance. You can use dirty kitty litter in a plastic bag the same way. Scent deterrents are least effective with raccoons, but can help when used in combination with light and sound methods.

Patience and persistence

Keep all of the above going for at least 3 days and 3 nights. You’ve got to be persistent to convince the raccoon to leave.

Paper Test

When you think the raccoon is gone, you want to make sure with a paper test: either stuff the entrance with balled up newspaper, or tape a double sheet of newspaper over the hole. Wait another 3 days and nights. If the paper is still in place, do a visual inspection of the shed or garage to make sure the raccoons are gone. Temporarily patch the entrance hole with ¼” wire mesh until you can do a more permanent repair.

What NOT to do

Live trapping

Trapping and relocating a raccoon might seem like the “humane” option, but it isn’t. Relocated raccoons don’t tend to survive when they’re moved off of their home territory. Relocated mother raccoons leave behind babies who will die without a mother to care for them. A mother raccoon relocated with her babies will be so frightened she will abandon them when faced with a new, unknown territory. In Ontario, it is illegal to relocate any wild animal more than 1km from where it was found.

Every year, Toronto Wildlife Centre receives hundreds of calls about baby raccoons orphaned because well-meaning people trapped and relocated their mother. Unfortunately, we don’t have the resources to care for them all.

One-way doors

Many humane removal companies will recommend putting up one-way doors so the raccoon can get out but not get back in. One-way doors are a good option between October and December, when tiny baby raccoons are unlikely. Between January and September, one-way doors can exclude the mother raccoon and leave tiny baby raccoons trapped inside. If they are too young to follow their mother, the babies will starve inside without her care. Separated from her babies, a mother raccoon will cause major damage to property as she tries desperately to get back to them. Make sure the baby raccoons are old enough to be mobile and following their mother before installing a one-way door.

Animal Removal Companies

Sometimes the best and easiest way to get a raccoon out of an attic is to hire a company to do it for you. Wildlife removal companies are not well monitored or licensed, so it is up to you to ask questions about a company’s practices before hiring them. Consult our guidelines for choosing a removal company.

www.torontowildlifecentre.com

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