Online calculator: Convert moles to grams and grams to moles

Convert moles to grams and grams to moles.

Contents

This online calculator converts to moles given grams and converts to grams given moles

For chemistry you often need to convert moles to grams and grams to moles.
There is a simple relation between these two:
,
where
— mass of the substance in grams
— quantity of the substance in moles
— molar mass of the substance in grams/mole

And the most difficult task here is finding out the molar mass of the substance.

The molar mass is a physical property defined as the mass of a given substance (chemical element or chemical compound) divided by the amount of substance. The molar mass of atoms of an element is given by the standard relative atomic mass of the element multiplied by the molar mass constant, 1 × 10−3 kg/mol = 1 g/mol. The molar mass of a compound is given by the sum of the standard atomic weight (namely, the standard relative atomic mass) of the atoms which form the compound multiplied by the molar mass constant. Multiplying by the molar mass constant ensures that the calculation is dimensionally correct: standard relative atomic masses are dimensionless quantities (i.e., pure numbers) whereas molar masses have units (in this case, grams/mole).

Happily, we already have the Molar mass of the substance calculator, which calculates molar mass for given substance using Periodic table handbook. It is used in the calculator below to parse chemical compound formula and obtain molar mass.

The calculator below calculates mass of the substance in grams or quantity of the substance in moles depending on user’s input. It also displays molar mass of the chemical compound and details of its calculation just for reference.

Note: Always use the upper case for the first character in the element name and the lower case for the second character as in periodic table. Compare: Co — cobalt and CO — carbon monoxide. Thus, Na3PO4 — correct notation, na3po4/NA3PO4 — incorrect notation.

planetcalc.com

Molecular weight of H2CO3

Molar mass of H2CO3 = 62.02478 g/mol

This compound is also known as Carbonic Acid.

Molecular weight calculation:
1.00794*2 + 12.0107 + 15.9994*3

›› Percent composition by element

Element Symbol Atomic Mass # of Atoms Mass Percent
Hydrogen H 1.00794 2 3.250%
Carbon C 12.0107 1 19.364%
Oxygen O 15.9994 3 77.386%

›› Similar chemical formulas

Note that all formulas are case-sensitive. Did you mean to find the molecular weight of one of these similar formulas?
H2CO3
H2Co3

›› Calculate the molecular weight of a chemical compound

›› More information on molar mass and molecular weight

In chemistry, the formula weight is a quantity computed by multiplying the atomic weight (in atomic mass units) of each element in a chemical formula by the number of atoms of that element present in the formula, then adding all of these products together.

If the formula used in calculating molar mass is the molecular formula, the formula weight computed is the molecular weight. The percentage by weight of any atom or group of atoms in a compound can be computed by dividing the total weight of the atom (or group of atoms) in the formula by the formula weight and multiplying by 100.

Using the chemical formula of the compound and the periodic table of elements, we can add up the atomic weights and calculate molecular weight of the substance.

Formula weights are especially useful in determining the relative weights of reagents and products in a chemical reaction. These relative weights computed from the chemical equation are sometimes called equation weights.

Finding molar mass starts with units of grams per mole (g/mol). When calculating molecular weight of a chemical compound, it tells us how many grams are in one mole of that substance. The formula weight is simply the weight in atomic mass units of all the atoms in a given formula.

The atomic weights used on this site come from NIST, the National Institute of Standards and Technology. We use the most common isotopes. This is how to calculate molar mass (average molecular weight), which is based on isotropically weighted averages. This is not the same as molecular mass, which is the mass of a single molecule of well-defined isotopes. For bulk stoichiometric calculations, we are usually determining molar mass, which may also be called standard atomic weight or average atomic mass.

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A common request on this site is to convert grams to moles. To complete this calculation, you have to know what substance you are trying to convert. The reason is that the molar mass of the substance affects the conversion. This site explains how to find molar mass.

www.convertunits.com

Convert grams CaCO3 to moles — Conversion
of Measurement Units

›› Convert grams CaCO3 to mole

›› More information from the unit converter

How many grams CaCO3 in 1 mol? The answer is 100.0869.
We assume you are converting between grams CaCO3 and mole.
You can view more details on each measurement unit:
molecular weight of CaCO3 or mol
This compound is also known as Calcium Carbonate.
The SI base unit for amount of substance is the mole.
1 grams CaCO3 is equal to 0.0099913175450533 mole.
Note that rounding errors may occur, so always check the results.
Use this page to learn how to convert between grams CaCO3 and mole.
Type in your own numbers in the form to convert the units!

›› Similar chemical formulas

Note that all formulas are case-sensitive. Did you mean to convert one of these similar formulas?
grams CaCO3 to moles
grams CAcO3 to moles
grams CaCo3 to moles

›› Quick conversion chart of grams CaCO3 to mol

1 grams CaCO3 to mol = 0.00999 mol

10 grams CaCO3 to mol = 0.09991 mol

50 grams CaCO3 to mol = 0.49957 mol

100 grams CaCO3 to mol = 0.99913 mol

200 grams CaCO3 to mol = 1.99826 mol

500 grams CaCO3 to mol = 4.99566 mol

1000 grams CaCO3 to mol = 9.99132 mol

›› Want other units?

You can do the reverse unit conversion from moles CaCO3 to grams, or enter other units to convert below:

›› Common amount of substance conversions

›› Details on molecular weight calculations

In chemistry, the formula weight is a quantity computed by multiplying the atomic weight (in atomic mass units) of each element in a chemical formula by the number of atoms of that element present in the formula, then adding all of these products together.

Using the chemical formula of the compound and the periodic table of elements, we can add up the atomic weights and calculate molecular weight of the substance.

If the formula used in calculating molar mass is the molecular formula, the formula weight computed is the molecular weight. The percentage by weight of any atom or group of atoms in a compound can be computed by dividing the total weight of the atom (or group of atoms) in the formula by the formula weight and multiplying by 100.

A common request on this site is to convert grams to moles. To complete this calculation, you have to know what substance you are trying to convert. The reason is that the molar mass of the substance affects the conversion. This site explains how to find molar mass.

Formula weights are especially useful in determining the relative weights of reagents and products in a chemical reaction. These relative weights computed from the chemical equation are sometimes called equation weights.

Finding molar mass starts with units of grams per mole (g/mol). When calculating molecular weight of a chemical compound, it tells us how many grams are in one mole of that substance. The formula weight is simply the weight in atomic mass units of all the atoms in a given formula.

The atomic weights used on this site come from NIST, the National Institute of Standards and Technology. We use the most common isotopes. This is how to calculate molar mass (average molecular weight), which is based on isotropically weighted averages. This is not the same as molecular mass, which is the mass of a single molecule of well-defined isotopes. For bulk stoichiometric calculations, we are usually determining molar mass, which may also be called standard atomic weight or average atomic mass.

www.convertunits.com

Convert moles H2CO3 to grams — Conversion
of Measurement Units

›› Convert moles H2CO3 to gram

›› More information from the unit converter

How many moles H2CO3 in 1 grams? The answer is 0.01612258842353.
We assume you are converting between moles H2CO3 and gram.
You can view more details on each measurement unit:
molecular weight of H2CO3 or grams
This compound is also known as Carbonic Acid.
The SI base unit for amount of substance is the mole.
1 mole is equal to 1 moles H2CO3, or 62.02478 grams.
Note that rounding errors may occur, so always check the results.
Use this page to learn how to convert between moles H2CO3 and gram.
Type in your own numbers in the form to convert the units!

›› Similar chemical formulas

Note that all formulas are case-sensitive. Did you mean to convert one of these similar formulas?
moles H2CO3 to grams
moles H2Co3 to grams

›› Quick conversion chart of moles H2CO3 to grams

1 moles H2CO3 to grams = 62.02478 grams

2 moles H2CO3 to grams = 124.04956 grams

3 moles H2CO3 to grams = 186.07434 grams

4 moles H2CO3 to grams = 248.09912 grams

5 moles H2CO3 to grams = 310.1239 grams

6 moles H2CO3 to grams = 372.14868 grams

7 moles H2CO3 to grams = 434.17346 grams

8 moles H2CO3 to grams = 496.19824 grams

9 moles H2CO3 to grams = 558.22302 grams

10 moles H2CO3 to grams = 620.2478 grams

›› Want other units?

You can do the reverse unit conversion from grams H2CO3 to moles, or enter other units to convert below:

›› Common amount of substance conversions

›› Details on molecular weight calculations

In chemistry, the formula weight is a quantity computed by multiplying the atomic weight (in atomic mass units) of each element in a chemical formula by the number of atoms of that element present in the formula, then adding all of these products together.

The atomic weights used on this site come from NIST, the National Institute of Standards and Technology. We use the most common isotopes. This is how to calculate molar mass (average molecular weight), which is based on isotropically weighted averages. This is not the same as molecular mass, which is the mass of a single molecule of well-defined isotopes. For bulk stoichiometric calculations, we are usually determining molar mass, which may also be called standard atomic weight or average atomic mass.

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If the formula used in calculating molar mass is the molecular formula, the formula weight computed is the molecular weight. The percentage by weight of any atom or group of atoms in a compound can be computed by dividing the total weight of the atom (or group of atoms) in the formula by the formula weight and multiplying by 100.

Finding molar mass starts with units of grams per mole (g/mol). When calculating molecular weight of a chemical compound, it tells us how many grams are in one mole of that substance. The formula weight is simply the weight in atomic mass units of all the atoms in a given formula.

Using the chemical formula of the compound and the periodic table of elements, we can add up the atomic weights and calculate molecular weight of the substance.

A common request on this site is to convert grams to moles. To complete this calculation, you have to know what substance you are trying to convert. The reason is that the molar mass of the substance affects the conversion. This site explains how to find molar mass.

Formula weights are especially useful in determining the relative weights of reagents and products in a chemical reaction. These relative weights computed from the chemical equation are sometimes called equation weights.

www.convertunits.com

Convert moles Carbonic Acid to grams —
Conversion of Measurement Units

›› Convert moles Carbonic Acid to gram

›› More information from the unit converter

How many moles Carbonic Acid in 1 grams? The answer is 0.01612258842353.
We assume you are converting between moles Carbonic Acid and gram.
You can view more details on each measurement unit:
molecular weight of Carbonic Acid or grams
The molecular formula for Carbonic Acid is H2CO3.
The SI base unit for amount of substance is the mole.
1 mole is equal to 1 moles Carbonic Acid, or 62.02478 grams.
Note that rounding errors may occur, so always check the results.
Use this page to learn how to convert between moles Carbonic Acid and gram.
Type in your own numbers in the form to convert the units!

›› Similar chemical formulas

Note that all formulas are case-sensitive. Did you mean to convert one of these similar formulas?
moles H2CO3 to grams
moles H2Co3 to grams

›› Quick conversion chart of moles Carbonic Acid to grams

1 moles Carbonic Acid to grams = 62.02478 grams

2 moles Carbonic Acid to grams = 124.04956 grams

3 moles Carbonic Acid to grams = 186.07434 grams

4 moles Carbonic Acid to grams = 248.09912 grams

5 moles Carbonic Acid to grams = 310.1239 grams

6 moles Carbonic Acid to grams = 372.14868 grams

7 moles Carbonic Acid to grams = 434.17346 grams

8 moles Carbonic Acid to grams = 496.19824 grams

9 moles Carbonic Acid to grams = 558.22302 grams

10 moles Carbonic Acid to grams = 620.2478 grams

›› Want other units?

You can do the reverse unit conversion from grams Carbonic Acid to moles, or enter other units to convert below:

›› Common amount of substance conversions

›› Details on molecular weight calculations

In chemistry, the formula weight is a quantity computed by multiplying the atomic weight (in atomic mass units) of each element in a chemical formula by the number of atoms of that element present in the formula, then adding all of these products together.

If the formula used in calculating molar mass is the molecular formula, the formula weight computed is the molecular weight. The percentage by weight of any atom or group of atoms in a compound can be computed by dividing the total weight of the atom (or group of atoms) in the formula by the formula weight and multiplying by 100.

Finding molar mass starts with units of grams per mole (g/mol). When calculating molecular weight of a chemical compound, it tells us how many grams are in one mole of that substance. The formula weight is simply the weight in atomic mass units of all the atoms in a given formula.

The atomic weights used on this site come from NIST, the National Institute of Standards and Technology. We use the most common isotopes. This is how to calculate molar mass (average molecular weight), which is based on isotropically weighted averages. This is not the same as molecular mass, which is the mass of a single molecule of well-defined isotopes. For bulk stoichiometric calculations, we are usually determining molar mass, which may also be called standard atomic weight or average atomic mass.

Using the chemical formula of the compound and the periodic table of elements, we can add up the atomic weights and calculate molecular weight of the substance.

Formula weights are especially useful in determining the relative weights of reagents and products in a chemical reaction. These relative weights computed from the chemical equation are sometimes called equation weights.

A common request on this site is to convert grams to moles. To complete this calculation, you have to know what substance you are trying to convert. The reason is that the molar mass of the substance affects the conversion. This site explains how to find molar mass.

www.convertunits.com

Convert grams H2CO3 to moles — Conversion
of Measurement Units

›› Convert grams H2CO3 to mole

›› More information from the unit converter

How many grams H2CO3 in 1 mol? The answer is 62.02478.
We assume you are converting between grams H2CO3 and mole.
You can view more details on each measurement unit:
molecular weight of H2CO3 or mol
This compound is also known as Carbonic Acid.
The SI base unit for amount of substance is the mole.
1 grams H2CO3 is equal to 0.01612258842353 mole.
Note that rounding errors may occur, so always check the results.
Use this page to learn how to convert between grams H2CO3 and mole.
Type in your own numbers in the form to convert the units!

›› Similar chemical formulas

Note that all formulas are case-sensitive. Did you mean to convert one of these similar formulas?
grams H2CO3 to moles
grams H2Co3 to moles

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›› Quick conversion chart of grams H2CO3 to mol

1 grams H2CO3 to mol = 0.01612 mol

10 grams H2CO3 to mol = 0.16123 mol

20 grams H2CO3 to mol = 0.32245 mol

30 grams H2CO3 to mol = 0.48368 mol

40 grams H2CO3 to mol = 0.6449 mol

50 grams H2CO3 to mol = 0.80613 mol

100 grams H2CO3 to mol = 1.61226 mol

200 grams H2CO3 to mol = 3.22452 mol

›› Want other units?

You can do the reverse unit conversion from moles H2CO3 to grams, or enter other units to convert below:

›› Common amount of substance conversions

›› Details on molecular weight calculations

In chemistry, the formula weight is a quantity computed by multiplying the atomic weight (in atomic mass units) of each element in a chemical formula by the number of atoms of that element present in the formula, then adding all of these products together.

Using the chemical formula of the compound and the periodic table of elements, we can add up the atomic weights and calculate molecular weight of the substance.

If the formula used in calculating molar mass is the molecular formula, the formula weight computed is the molecular weight. The percentage by weight of any atom or group of atoms in a compound can be computed by dividing the total weight of the atom (or group of atoms) in the formula by the formula weight and multiplying by 100.

A common request on this site is to convert grams to moles. To complete this calculation, you have to know what substance you are trying to convert. The reason is that the molar mass of the substance affects the conversion. This site explains how to find molar mass.

The atomic weights used on this site come from NIST, the National Institute of Standards and Technology. We use the most common isotopes. This is how to calculate molar mass (average molecular weight), which is based on isotropically weighted averages. This is not the same as molecular mass, which is the mass of a single molecule of well-defined isotopes. For bulk stoichiometric calculations, we are usually determining molar mass, which may also be called standard atomic weight or average atomic mass.

Formula weights are especially useful in determining the relative weights of reagents and products in a chemical reaction. These relative weights computed from the chemical equation are sometimes called equation weights.

Finding molar mass starts with units of grams per mole (g/mol). When calculating molecular weight of a chemical compound, it tells us how many grams are in one mole of that substance. The formula weight is simply the weight in atomic mass units of all the atoms in a given formula.

www.convertunits.com

10.2: Conversions Between Moles and Atoms

Do you hate to type subscripts and superscripts? Even with a good word-processing program, having to click on an icon to get a superscript and then remembering to click off after you type the number can be a real hassle. If we did not know about moles and just knew about numbers of atoms or molecules (those big numbers that require lots of superscripts), life would be much more complicated and we would make many more typing errors.

Conversions Between Moles and Atoms

Conversions Between Moles and Number of Particles

Using our unit conversion techniques, we can use the mole label to convert back and forth between the number of particles and moles.

The element carbon exists in two primary forms: graphite and diamond. How many moles of carbon atoms is (4.72 times 10^<24>) atoms of carbon?

Solution:

Step 1: List the known quantities and plan the problem.

  • number of (ce) atoms (= 4.72 times 10^<24>)
  • (1) mole (= 6.02 times 10^<23>) atoms

One conversion factor will allow us to convert from the number of (ce) atoms to moles of (ce) atoms.

Step 2: Calculate

Step 3: Think about your result.

The given number of carbon atoms was greater than Avogadro’s number,so the number of moles of (ce) atoms is greater than 1 mole. Since Avogadro’s number is a measured quantity with three significant figures, the result of the calculation is rounded to three significant figures.

Suppose that you wanted to know how many hydrogen atoms were in a mole of water molecules. First, you would need to know the chemical formula for water, which is (ce). There are two atoms of hydrogen in each molecule of water. How many atoms of hydrogen would there be in two water molecules? There would be (2 times 2 = 4) hydrogen atoms. How about in a dozen? In that case a dozen is 12 so (12 times 2 = 24) hydrogen atoms in a dozen water molecules. To get the answers (4 and 24), you had to multiply the given number of molecules by two atoms of hydrogen per molecule. So to find the number of hydrogen atoms in a mole of water molecules, the problem could be solved using conversion factors.

The first conversion factor converts from moles of particles to the number of particles. The second conversion factor reflects the number of atoms contained within each molecule.

Figure 10.2.1: Two water molecules contain 4 hydrogen atoms and 2 oxygen atoms. A mole of water molecules contains 2 moles of hydrogen atoms and 1 mole of oxygen atoms.

Sulfuric acid has the chemical formula (ce). A certain quantity of sulfuric acid contains (4.89 times 10^<25>) atoms of oxygen. How many moles of sulfuric acid is the sample?

Step 1: List the known quantities and plan the problem.

Two conversion factors will be used. First, convert atoms of oxygen to molecules of sulfuric acid. Then, convert molecules of sulfuric acid to moles of sulfuric acid.

Step 2: Calculate

Step 3: Think about your result.

The original number of oxygen atoms was about 80 times larger than Avogadro’s number. Since each sulfuric acid molecule contains 4 oxgyen atoms, there are about 20 moles of sulfuric acid molecules.

Summary

  • Methods are described for conversions between moles, atoms, and molecules.

Contributors

CK-12 Foundation by Sharon Bewick, Richard Parsons, Therese Forsythe, Shonna Robinson, and Jean Dupon.

chem.libretexts.org

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