7 Unique Abilities of Good Leaders — Ron Edmondson

7 Unique Abilities of Good Leaders

Leadership is never easy. To lead well requires unique abilities.

Here are 7:

Ability to stand alone – You don’t have to always stand alone as a leader. In fact, that should never be the goal, but there will be times it takes others time to catch the vision you are certain you have been called to lead. There will be days when everyone appears a critic. You’ll still have to lead. That’s why not everyone is willing to lead.

Ability to see what others can’t see – Leaders are taking people into the unknown. They see beyond the clutter of today into a bigger picture; a brighter reality. Many times they can view the end goal…as blurry as it may be…before others can. That’s why people need a leader.

Ability to think beyond today – Leadership is different from managing. It’s not about maintaining systems. It’s about what’s next. What’s ahead. What’s yet to be realized. That requires a more heads up rather than heads down approach. Not everyone has that ability.

Ability to cast a vision – People need to know the why behind the what. They need something to inspire them for the difficult days ahead. Good leaders can communicate effectively, share passion and motivate others to endure and succeed.

Ability to include people in the process – Leaders have a unique understanding that they can’t complete the task without the assistance of others. Genuine leaders share credit and acknowledge the contributions of those they lead. There is little room for selfishness or dictatorial control in good leadership.

Ability to make the first move – Leaders aren’t intimidated by fear or the unknown. They aren’t emotionless, but they know the journey to victory begins with the first step…and they will lead others in taking that step. This ability alone eliminates many from the field of leadership.

Ability to stay when others are leaving – There will be times of chaos when everything seems to be falling apart. The leader holds the banner of stability, pointing people back to the vision, reminding them of the rewards for staying the course.

Certainly there are others and I welcome you to share them. I’m also certain there have been great leaders who don’t have all seven of these, but good leadership will requires each of these at some point. And, great leaders, in my opinion, display each one often or when required.

What unique abilities would you add for good leadership?

Leader, do some soul-searching. Upon which of these do you need to improve?

ronedmondson.com

Unique Ability ®

What Is Unique Ability ® ?

At the core of your being are characteristics and values entirely unique to you. Connect to your deepest self, and find your purpose in life through the Unique Ability ® Discovery Process.

This journey will inspire you to trust your intuition and encourage you to build a bespoke life around doing what you love to do and do best.

About The Book

Start your journey to uncovering the deeper you with the Unique Ability ® 2.0: Discovery book and notebook—a step-by-step path to major growth.

Resources

Delve into the world of Unique Ability ® in even greater detail, and experience the exhilaration of finding your purpose in life.

Score Yourself

Give yourself a score of 1-12 on eight Unique Ability ® mindsets and see where you can improve.

Explore

Give yourself the gift of self-knowledge.

“Unique Ability provides you with a deep, personal, and illuminating view of who you are. You’ll immediately recognize exactly how to overcome challenges while accomplishing new goals, objectives, and achievements.”

uniqueability.com

10 Animals with Extraordinary Abilities

Through millions of years of evolution, animals have developed some spectacular abilities to help them thrive. These abilities come in handy when they are looking for food or protecting themselves from becoming food for other animals. Some of these abilities help them attract a potential mate to propagate their species. Whichever is the purpose, these abilities fill us with awe and are a source of inspiration for many inventors. It’s no wonder that comic artists find ideas in these animals with extraordinary abilities for their superheroes and supervillains.

1. Male dung beetles can pull 1,141 times their own body weight. It’s the same as a person pulling six double-decker buses full of people.

Dung beetles are found on all continents except Australia and feed on dung, mushrooms, and decaying fruits and leaves. Most of them find the dung through smell. Then they roll it into a ball and move quickly away in a straight line despite any obstacles to get as far away from other beetles as possible so that the ball won’t be stolen.

The beetles bury the dung balls either to store them as food or to turn it into a brooding ball and make a home as a pair. The dung beetles usually can roll dung 10 times their own weight, but the male Onthophagus taurus beetles are capable of rolling as much as 1,141 times their weight.

Rolling unbelievable amounts of dung aren’t the only amazing thing about the dung beetles. They are the only known insects that can orient themselves according to the Milky Way or very bright stars. The African Scarabaeus zambesianus species navigate their way by polarization patterns of moonlight. (source)

2. There is a species of jellyfish called the “immortal jellyfish” which, as the name implies, cannot die of old age. When fatally injured or very old, it just reverts back to its sexually immature stage and starts the lifecycle again.

Jellyfish have a complex life cycle that includes two phases: a sexual phase also known as the “medusa,” and the asexual phase known as the “polyp.” A fertilized egg becomes a swimming larva which then develops into a polyp. Polyps are stationary. They live at the bottom of the sea or attach themselves to boat hulls, planktons, other invertebrates, or rarely fish. As they grow, they also reproduce by budding and forming more polyps. When polyps mature, they become medusa, the free-swimming form we recognize as jellyfish which reproduce sexually and hatch eggs.

Though most species of jellyfish have a limited lifespan, the medusa of Turritopsis dohrnii is the only known species that could revert back to its polyp stage when faced with starvation, damage to its body, or even changes in temperature. In the polyp stage, jellyfish reproduce asexually into more polyps, and the new polyps grow to become more jellyfish. Essentially, this species of jellyfish is biologically immortal and can only die when eaten by predators, diseased, or killed either accidentally or deliberately. (source)

3. As a defensive strategy, the Alpine ibex climbs near-vertical, rocky places to protect itself from predators. This gravity-defying species of wild goat can be found living as high up as 3,300 meters (10,800 feet) above sea level.

Ibexes are several species of mountain goats that are known for their excellent climbing skills. Like the mountain goats, which are not really goats, the ibex have cloven hooves that can spread apart, inner pads that provide traction, and hook-like structures called “dewclaws” that prevent them from slipping. Their shoulders and neck muscles are so strong that they enable ibex to jump as high as six feet without a running start.

The ibex love to live quite high up—the Siberian ibexes, for example, are commonly found on cliffs between 2,000 and 5,000 meters high, and the Walia ibexes live between 2,500 to 4,500 meters altitude. This defensive strategy, however, isn’t much help if the predator is an eagle. Eagles simply grab the goat and toss it off the mountain before proceeding to eat it.

These goats are also often seen climbing man-made structures like walls, houses, and especially dams. The Alpine ibex often climb the Cingino Dam in northern Italy so that they could lick the salt and mineral deposits off the dam’s rocks. (source)

4. The hagfish are ancient, eel-shaped creatures that profusely secrete thick slime when threatened. The slime is made of fibers thinner than a blood cell’s width and as strong as Kevlar.

The slime comes in extremely handy when predators like sharks, conger eels, or wreckfish try to grab a bite of the hagfish. The slime clogs up the gills, making it extremely difficult for them to breathe, while the hagfish just slips away. With such a foolproof way of protecting themselves, it’s no wonder there isn’t much in the way of evolutionary change between the hagfish we see now and those from 300 million years ago.

The hagfish are equipped with more than a hundred glands on their body that secrete a mixture of microfibers and mucus. As discovered by Douglas Fudge of Chapman University, California, the fibers are tightly wound up like a ball of wool inside thin cell membranes. When mixed with water, these membranes burst and the fibers unwind. The slime expands nearly 10,000 times its volume forming up to 20 liters of sticky, gelatinous material. Following an accident involving a truck full of hagfish on July 14, 2017, the road and a car became completely coated in the slime.

Hagfish Slime, Naval Surface Warfare Center Panama City Division. Image Source: Ron Newsome/US Navy

The slime has many potential uses including a bio-alternative to kevlar and defense against sharks for divers, both being researched on by the US Navy. The Navy researchers have managed to use E. coli bacteria to recreate the proteins in the slime. Lukas Böni, a researcher from ETH Zürich, is working on using the slime as an alternative to commercial gelatin that doesn’t require heating. (1, 2)

5. The pistol shrimp snap their claws so fast that the water instantly vaporizes creating a bubble that travels at 100 kilometers per hour and releases sound at 218 decibels. As the bubble collapses, it reaches 5,000° K (4,700° C) and produces a flash of light.

Pistol shrimps, also known as “snapping shrimps,” have one normal claw and one large claw that is half the size of their body. This dominant claw is not like typical claws but has a “hammer” part which moves backward perpendicular to the other part. When the hammer is released, it snaps back with such force that it releases hot-water-vapor bubbles that stun its prey or even kill small fish. It can even break a small glass jar.

The snapping sound these creatures generate is so loud that it competes with the sounds made by sperm whales and beluga whales, the loudest animals underwater. The bubbles created by the snap are called “cavitation bubbles” and they emit short bursts of light as they implode, an effect known as “sonoluminescence.” As the bubble implodes, it reaches temperatures of over 5,000° K (4,700° C), the estimated temperature on the surface of the Sun being 5,800° K (5,500° C). (source)

6. Salmon have small iron particles in their skulls that act like a compass needle directing their migration from the ocean back to the river in which they were born. This ability is known as “magnetoception.”

The migration of salmon, also known as a “salmon run,” is one of the most extreme migrations in the animal kingdom. They swim hundreds of miles upstream to reach the gravel beds of the upper reaches of the rivers in which they were hatched, and they do this without feeding. Salmon are capable of leaping and jumping as high as 3.65 meters vertically as they navigate waterfalls and rapids. The journey is physically exhausting and costs almost all their energy.

What’s remarkable about their migration is their ability to return to their birth river. One theory is that the specific smells of the home river or tributary become imprinted in them before they leave for the ocean. In 1973, researchers were able to show that Atlantic salmon have conditioned cardiac responses to electric fields that are similar to those found in oceans. In 1988, researchers found that the skulls of sockeye salmon have iron in the form of single-domain magnetite and in enough quantities to help them sense the Earth’s magnetic field. (source)

7. The hairy frog is known for its “retractable claws” which it projects by deliberately breaking its own toe bones and projecting the shards through the skin. It is also called the “Wolverine frog” for this reason.

Also known as the “horror frog,” the hairy frog can be recognized by the eponymous hair-like structures along their flanks and thighs. The hair is actually dermal papillae with arteries which are believed to increase the surface area for oxygen absorption. During their tadpole stage, they are very muscular with rows of horned teeth. As adults, they feed on slugs, grasshoppers, spiders, and beetles.

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The hairy frog’s notable feature is the retractable claws. The frog also has nodules at the end of its fingers that act as anchors to the claws when they are sheathed. When attacked or grabbed, it breaks the tough collagen strands and forces the sharpened bones into the skin of its attacker. The claws are believed retract passively over time as the damaged tissue regenerates. (source)

8. Sea cucumbers have a compound called “catch collagen” which changes from a solid form to liquid and then back to solid. This allows them to liquefy their bodies, pour themselves into a crack, and solidify there.

Sea cucumbers have a few very special defense mechanisms that protect them from predators. They have toxins that make them a disagreeable meal for many marine predators. Some species of sea cucumbers spit sticky Cuvierian tubules, clusters of fine tubes at the end of their respiratory tree which trap the predators. Sometimes, a toxin known as “holothurin” is released along with the tubules which can kill any nearby animals. These tubules grow back in a matter of just a few days.

The sea cucumbers, like many other echinoderms, have a network of very small collagen fibrils embedded under their skin. These fibrils can be voluntarily controlled by the sea cucumbers. When they need to hide, they can make themselves soft by unlinking the fibrils and pour through cracks. Then can stiffen again, making it impossible for the predator to pull them out of the crack. (1, 2)

9. The Australian lyrebird can mimic practically any sound it hears to attract a potential mate. It can imitate songs of other birds, dogs barking, camera shutters, crying babies, mobile phone ringtones, and rarely, even the human voice.

Lyrebirds have the most complex syrinx, the vocal organ of birds, among all songbirds which gives them the amazing ability to mimic many natural as well as artificial sounds in their environment. They sing most between June and August, the peak of their breeding season, and for as many as four hours a day. It takes the young birds about a year to perfect their mimicking ability. Though the females also love to sing, they often stay silent when the male is courting but display their abilities while foraging or defending their nest.

Other sounds in the lyrebird’s repertoire are the sounds of koalas, dingoes, a mill whistle, a cross-cut saw, fire alarms, rifle shots, car alarms and engines, and music. Though they were reported to imitate the human voice, it is unusual, and the reports are often exaggerated. (source)

10. Bees can generate up to 450 volts of positive electric charge on their bodies when flying. They use this electrostatic force to communicate with other bees and to sense if a flower has already been visited by another bee.

As they fly, bees hit charged particles such as dust and molecules which rip off the electrons on their cuticle, the outer shell of their body, giving them a positive charge. The cuticles do not conduct electricity, so they build up quite an amount of charge this way. Though the researchers knew about this since 1929, they believed the charge to be negligent. But, when Uwe Greggers, a researcher at the Free University of Berlin, measured the charge, he found that it could reach as high as 450 volts.

The bees put the electric charge to a lot of uses. On clear days, flowers have a negative charge. So, if a bee has already visited a flower, its charge changes. Other bees can sense this change and can tell the difference between a recently visited flower and a fresh one.

The bees also use this charge to communicate with other bees when they enter the hive through “waggle dancing.” Firstly, they give information about the distance and direction of flowers with nectar and pollen, water, or new nest sites by moving their bodies. Secondly, while dancing, they generate air flows and electric fields that produce vibrations that can be detected by the antenna of other bees. (source)

factsc.com

What Is Unique Ability®?

Dan Sullivan first noticed how beautifully unique we are when hired to interview people with disabilities for a Canadian Parliamentary report. It became clear to him very quickly that the most successful people are those who have learned how to focus on and leverage their unique strengths. In other words, they build their lives around their abilities, not their disabilities. He began talking about his realizations as “Unique Ability.”

What he observed is that each and every individual is born with unique characteristics. But what was most interesting to him was how few were able to powerfully communicate exactly what those were.

How is Unique Ability connected to your success?

Unique Ability, by definition, is the essence of what you love to do and do best. It’s your own set of natural talents and the passion that fuels you to contribute in the ways that most motivate you. When articulated, it describes the “you” that makes you who you are.

By strengthening the areas where we have the possibility of achieving extraordinary results, it allows us the greatest opportunity for success. It also gives us the freedom to determine our most satisfying path in life.

Begin your journey to finding purpose in life and getting closer to the heart of what drives you. Get started today by downloading the Beginner’s Guide to Unique Ability.

Uncovering your Unique Ability.

Most people are completely unaware that they have a Unique Ability. When we’re so close to our uniqueness, it makes it difficult to appreciate those things that come so naturally to us. We tend to believe that everyone can do the same things we can.

To start determining what activities are or are not your Unique Ability, use Unique Ability® 2.0: Discovery as your guidebook through the process. You can begin by brainstorming what activities and skills in your day-to-day life can be described by these four qualities:

  1. Superior skill. You produce outstanding results with this talent. It’s so natural to you, you can’t help but do this extraordinarily well. Others notice this skill, rely on it, and value it.
  2. Passion. You love to do this, and probably did it in some form long before you got paid for it. In fact, many people continue to give their Unique Ability away for free because they don’t recognize how special and valuable it is.
  3. Energy. Using your Unique Ability gives you a boost of energy. The people around you get energy from you too, because it’s fun and exciting to be around someone who’s both passionate about and talented at what they’re doing. Likewise, when you surround yourself with other Unique Abilities, your days are filled with positivity, dynamism, and creativity.
  4. Never-ending improvement. You’re already exceptional at this, yet you could do it for the rest of your life and always find new ways to get better and better.

Start listening to your strengths.

Focusing on your Unique Ability—that unique superior skill combined with passion that every individual possesses—is more important now than ever with the rapid technological changes impacting our world. From the perspective of Unique Ability, the future is full of opportunity and there’s a sense of simplicity because you’re clear about the right path.

You don’t need to spend a lot of energy guessing about who or what you should be, or wondering if a particular opportunity or choice is right for you. When it’s your path, you create it as you go, with Unique Ability as your guide. Its constant evolution becomes your life’s work and enjoyment. It’s the truest freedom possible!

resources.strategiccoach.com

Pipeline-beetle with unique abilities

June 23, 2020 — June. 26, 2020

Venue to be announced

The Midyear Check and Connect Institute is a follow-up to the Florida Postsecondary Education Program Planning Institute held in November 2019. The purpose of this Institute was to provide professional development and technical assistance to IHE teams to facilitate the planning and implementation of Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs (FPCTPs) for students with intellectual disabilities in all types of postsecondary education institutions: universities, state and community colleges, and career tech centers.

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March 31, 2020

Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs Midyear Check and Connect Institute has been cancelled

Due to travel restrictions and social distancing practices, the Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs Midyear Check and Connect Institute, including Florida College and Career Transition Clubs Annual Meeting and Post-Institute Workshop from June 23-26, 2020 is cancelled. Please stay tuned! The Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities is exploring how critical components of the Institute can be delivered in alternative formats during the same time frame.

November 25, 2019

FloridaPEPPI Fall 2019 Breakout Content Session Slides

The presentation slides from the three breakout content sessions, opening keynote, and closing keynote are available to download in the following link. Please notice all the files are in a PDF format and will require the appropriate software to open it.

March 19, 2018

Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities Informational Webinars

The Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities will offer informational webinars the first Tuesday of each month at 3:00 p.m. EST. The title and host of each webinar will be available on our Upcoming Events section as well as the registration link for those interested. We will record the webinar and post the video in our YouTube channel.

Recently.

Webinar: We’re in This Together — Supports for New Programs in Submitting Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Program Applications

April 21, 2020. 3 — 4 PM

This webinar was a follow-up to the March 3, 2020 webinar, Updates on Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Program Application, and Grant Proposals. Step-by-step information will be provided on submitting applications via our FCSUA Online Portal will be reviewed, along with a demonstration of how new institutions of higher education can gain access to begin the FPCTP application process.

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Webinar: Mental Health and Wellness — Meeting the Needs of Students in Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs

April 7, 2020. 3 — 4 PM

Dr. Deborah Reed, Associate Instructor, University of North Florida was our guest presenter. Her research interests include improving post-secondary outcomes for students with disabilities.

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Webinar: Updates on Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Program Application and Grant Proposals

March 3, 2020. 3 — 4 PM

This webinar was focus on updates to the FPCTP new and renewal application process, as well as updates to the FPCTP Start-Up and Enhancement Grant Proposals. We will also provide information regarding recent guidance we’ve received regarding the Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Program Act that enables us to increase grant funding to support new and continuing FPCTPs. This webinar was not recorded due to technical difficulties.

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Webinar: Project TOPS (Transitions tO PostSecondary InstitutionS): Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Program Development and Structure at Robert Morgan Educational Center and Technical College

February 4, 2020. 3 — 4 PM

February’s informational webinar invited Dr. Vivian Vieta and her team at Robert Morgan Educational Center and Technical College to talk about the approved Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Program (FPCTP) Project TOPS(Transition tO Postsecondary InstitutionS). Dr. Vieta and her team shared the beginning of the program with the Florida Developmental Disabilities Council grant, how they applied to the FPCTP Enhancement grant, received the CTP federal status, and how they reapplied to the FPCTP Enhancement grant for two additional years. They also described the programs supported by Project TOPS and how they deliver services to the students. The project has 24 total students this trimester.

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Webinar: Completing and Submitting the International Mentor Training Program Certification (IMTPC) documentation to the College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA)

January 7, 2020. 2:30 — 3:30 PM

As a follow up of previous webinars and a Florida Postsecondary Education Program Planning Institute workshop, January’s informational webinar was about completing and submitting the International Mentor Training Program Certification documentation to the College of Reading and Learning Association. The presenter for this webinar was Michael Saenz, Assistant Director of Students Success from the University of Texas at Dallas.

Webinar: FloridaShines

December 3, 2019. 3 — 4 PM

The presenter in this webinar was Maggie Miller, the Lead Florida Trainer, MyCareerShines.

About FloridaShines
We exist to empower all of Florida’s 20,000,000 residents to earn a college degree and find a bright career. Whether you’re in high school just starting to think about college or you’re already working and ready to earn or complete your degree, FloridaShines can help. We’ve got the resources and support you need. FloridaShines works with the state’s 40 colleges and universities and other partners to help you succeed in school and beyond. Check your transcript. Register for an online course. Search libraries across the state. And a whole lot more. All designed to help you shine. FloridaShines — Florida’s Student Hub of Innovative Educational Services — is a service of the Florida Virtual Campus.

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Florida Postsecondary Education Program Planning Institute Fall 2019

November 6, 2019 — November 8, 2019. Wyndham Grand Orlando Resort Bonnet Creek. 14651 Chelonia Pkwy, Orlando, FL 32821

Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities is moving the Annual Florida Postsecondary Education Program Planning Institute to November 2019. The purpose of this Institute is to increase understanding of resources available for and facilitate planning and implementation of Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs (FPCTP) for students with intellectual disabilities in all types of postsecondary education institutions: universities, state and community colleges, and career tech centers. The Pre-institute Workshop will be about FPCTP Applications and Grants Proposals. The hotel rooms block will be open until October 21 for us to book your room. Please do not wait until last minute to register! Use the link below:

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Preparing for the Florida Postsecondary Education Program Planning Institute – Fall 2019: Using the Online Strategic Planning Tool to Summarize Your Work and Prepare for the Future

October 1, 2019. 3 — 4 PM

The next Florida Postsecondary Education Program Planning Institute will take place on November 6 — 8, 2019. This webinar provides IHE team leaders and members an overview of the Institute format, agenda, and planning process. The webinar also focuses on using the online strategic planning tool’s report features to summarize the team’s progress in planning, implementing, and or improving their FPCTP. These features are helpful as the team prepares for the Fall 2019 Institute and its work during 2019 — 2020.

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Webinar: Overview of the Online Strategic Planning Tool: Postsecondary Education Programs Component

September 10, 2019. 3 — 4 PM

The online strategic planning tool is a web-based system that links research with practice to (1) build capacity and develop programs to provide K-12 transition education and services and (2) plan and implement inclusive postsecondary education programs. The postsecondary education component was launched on June 18 for use by all types of higher education institutions: Universities, state colleges, and technical colleges. Whether you are planning an inclusive postsecondary education program that serves students with intellectual disabilities or just seeking to improve your services, this planning system applies a framework for using data to reflect on current practice and outcomes, identify strengths and needs, and subsequently develop a plan to address needs and evaluate intended results.

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Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs (FPCTP) Midyear Check and Connect Institute — Plus!

June 25, 2019 — June. 28, 2019. Embassy Suites – Orlando North, 225 Shorecrest Drive, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701

The Midyear Check and Connect Institute was a follow-up to the Florida Postsecondary Education Program Planning Institute held in January 2019. The purpose of this Institute was to provide professional development and technical assistance to IHE teams to facilitate planning and implementation of Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs (FPCTPs) for students with intellectual disabilities in all types of postsecondary education institutions: universities, state and community colleges, and career tech centers.
This year’s event consisted of three components – IHE team members are welcome at and encouraged to attend all three (see the draft agenda):

  • The first annual meeting for student representatives of FCSUA’s College and Career Transition Clubs from high schools across the state (June 25 – 26);
  • FPCTP Midyear Check and Connect Institute for professional development and program planning (June 26 – 27); and
  • Workshop on developing a CRLA-certified peer tutoring program to support your FPCTP students (June 27 – 28).

Downloads:

Webinar: Sexuality, Personal Safety, and Sex Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities at the Postsecondary Level

May 7, 2019. 3 — 4 PM

Dr. Kimberly Spence, Coordinator of Educational and Training Programs at UCF CARD — Center for Autism and Related Disabilities was the presenter of Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities monthly webinar corresponding to May. The topic: Sexuality, Personal Safety, and Sex Education for Students with Intellectual Disabilities at the Postsecondary Level.

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Webinar: «A Quality Summary of Performance (SOP) and how Postsecondary Programs use the Information they Contain»

April 2, 2019. 3 — 4 PM

The Summary of Performance of students exiting K-12 should support students’ success in postsecondary education. This webinar gave guidance on how the process should work and what information the document should contain. The presenters were: Dr. Jim Martin, Emeritus Professor of Ed Psychology, Retired Oklahoma University Zarrow Center Chair and Director and Dr. Gwen Williams, Associate Professor, Interim Chair, Department of Educational, Multicultural and Exceptional Studies at Jackson State University.

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Webinar: Measuring Student Learning Outcomes

March 5, 2019. 3 — 4 PM

This webinar focused on connecting the dots while developing FPCTP curriculum. Students enrolled in FPCTPs earn specific credentials by succeeding in a defined program of study through which they develop the competencies associated with employment aligned with their career goals. Dr. Viki Kelchner, Assistant Professor and Internship Field Placement Coordinator at UCF College of Community Innovation and Education discussed how an important aspect of student success is defining and measuring the expected student learning outcomes embedded in the program of study so that students are on track to successfully complete the program. All students must demonstrate Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) to receive financial aid, including the FPCTP Scholarship. Aligning expected student learning outcomes, SAP standards, and programs of study that result in meaningful employment-related credentials are fundamental steps in providing a successful FPCTP.

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Webinar: The Academy for Community Inclusion: Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Program Development and Structure at Florida Atlantic University

February 5, 2019. 3 — 4 PM

Dr. Mary Lou Duffy, Professor of the Department of Exceptional Student Education at FAU and Project Coordinator for ACI provided information about the program development and structure of the Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Program (FPCTP) Academy for Community Inclusion (ACI) at Florida Atlantic University (FAU) on Jupiter Campus.

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Second Annual Florida Postsecondary Education Program Planning Institute

January 23, 2019 — January 25, 2019. B Resort and Spa – 1905 Hotel Plaza Boulevard, Lake Buena Vista, FL

The purpose of this Institute is to increase understanding of resources available for and facilitate planning and implementation of Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs (FPCTP) for students with intellectual disabilities in all types of postsecondary education institutions: universities, state and community colleges, and career tech centers. This is a team-focused event for postsecondary education program planning teams representing a higher education institution or career tech district. Bring your team of higher education faculty and staff, disability service providers, special populations coordinators, K-12 transition staff, parents, students, and/or other relevant stakeholders.

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Speaking Up for Your Success: Strengthening Self-Advocacy Skills in a University Setting

January 22, 2019. 12:00 PM — 1:15 PM. UCF Teaching Academy, Room 420B

Lunch and Learn: Janice Seabrooks-Blackmore is a Professor and Chair of the Department of Exceptional, Deaf, and Interpreter Education at the University of North Florida. Janice has served in various leadership roles within the department and college and has extensive experience working closely with diverse groups of students, families, and colleagues in public schools and institutions of higher education. Her work focuses on issues related to equal access to resources and opportunities, and the empowerment of voice for all individuals, particularly those with disabilities. Lunch will be provided; RSVP required to [email protected] by January 19, 2019.

Webinar: College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA) International Mentor Training Program Certification (IMTPC) Overview.

December 4, 2018. 3 — 4 PM

The purpose of this webinar is to provide an overview of the CRLA International Mentor Training Program Certification (IMTPC) to Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs. The presenter for this webinar will be Michael Saenz, Assistant Director of Students Success from the University of Texas at Dallas.

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Webinar: «Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs at Florida State Colleges: Three Approaches to Program Development and Program Structure at Santa Fe College, Indian River State College, and Florida Keys Community College»

November 6, 2018. 3 — 4 PM

FCSUA welcomes Linda Mussillo from Project SAINT at Santa Fe College, Marria Partee from STAGE Program at Indian River State College, and Susan Chiappone from Project ACCESS at Florida Keys Community College. They are the program directors of three Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs (FPCTP) at Florida State Colleges and shared their approaches to program development and program structure.

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Drs. Paula D. Kohler and Drew Andrews presentation at 2018 DCDT Conference

October 26, 2018. Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Drs. Paula D. Kohler and Drew Andrews participated at the 2018 Division on Career Development and Transition International Conference with the presentation «From Research to Practice: A Strategic Planning System for Postsecondary Education Programs». The presentation described how Florida provides supports for PSE programs for students with intellectual disabilities across the state, including the Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities (FCSUA). Also described how FCSUA fosters program development in universities, colleges, and CTE centers, and identifies evidence-based and promising practices regarding PSE for students with ID and integrated that information into a strategic planning process and a Team Planning Tool for program development.

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Central Florida Disability Chamber: Disabilities and Unique Abilities in the Workplace Panel Discussion

October 3, 2018. Goodwill Industries of Central Florida

Dr. Paula Kohler was part of the Disabilities and Unique Abilities in the Workplace Panel Discussion hosted by the Central Florida Disability Chamber (CFDC) on October 3 at 9 a.m. This event toke place during the National Disability Employment Awareness Month. This informative panel also included Attorney Rick Larson and Goodwill Industries Vice President of Workforce Innovation Maria Cherjovsky. The panelists helped to understand diversity in the workplace and dispel common biases that often hinder success, as well as bridge the gap between law and reality.

Webinar: «Perspectives From FLDOE: What The Florida College System and Career and Adult Education Look for When Reviewing Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Program (FPCTP) Applications for Approval”

October 2, 2018. 3 — 4 PM

FCSUA welcomes Stephanie Leland and Kathleen Taylor from the Division of Florida Colleges and Division of Career and Adult Education to give the perspective of the Florida Department of Education during the reviewing process of a Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Program (FPCTP) Application.

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Webinar: Agency Supports for Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs: The Agency for Persons with Disabilities (APD)

September 11, 2018. 3 — 4 PM

In this webinar we welcome Debra Noel, Regional Program Supervisor and Community Affairs and Wait List Lead from the Agency for Persons with Disabilities (APD) to share information on postsecondary education supports provided by APD.

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Tallahassee Community College Eagle Connections Mentor Academy.

August 15, 2018 — August. 16, 2018. Tallahassee, Florida

The Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities represented by the Dr. W. Drew Andrews, Technical Assistance Coordinator, will be part of the training to EAGLE Connections Postsecondary Program mentors at Tallahassee Community College following the International Mentor Training Program Certification (IMTPC) Level 1 requirements offered by the College Reading & Learning Association.

FCSUA as Youth Summit Exhibitor during The 11th Annual Youth Summit

August 3, 2018 — August. 4, 2018. Florida Hotel & Conference Center. Orlando, Florida

Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities will have a display table at the 11th Annual Youth Summit hosted by The Florida Youth Council. This conference is a place for young people with disabilities between the ages of 15 and 30 from communities across the state of Florida to come together to learn, share, and network. The 11th Annual Youth Summit will bring together over 200 youth and emerging leaders to attend engaging youth-only sessions on a wide variety of topics, including transition, workplace preparedness, and post-secondary schooling.

Dr. Paula Kohler’s presentation during the 52nd Florida Association for Career and Technical Education (FACTE) Annual Conference and Trade Show

July 18, 2018. ChampionsGate Resort ​Orlando, Florida

This presentation will take place between 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM at the Osceola A Conference Room. The 2016 enactment of the Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Program Act is making meaningful change in the lives of students with intellectual disabilities in all types of postsecondary education settings: universities, state colleges and district technical centers and colleges. During the presentation Dr. Kohler will explain how the Act is being implemented, grant and scholarship availability, and model programs striving to improve postsecondary outcomes for our young people with unique abilities.

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Dr. W. Drew Andrews presentations during the 2018 Florida Youth Leadership Forum

July 18, 2018 — July 22, 2018. Tallahassee, FL

FCSUA will participate at the 2018 Florida Youth Leadership Forum (YLF) represented by Dr. W. Drew Andrews, Technical Assistance Coordinator. The YLF for Students with Disabilities is a unique leadership-training program for high school students with disabilities.

FCSUA will participate at the CRLA Summer Institute For Tutor and Mentor Trainers

July 15, 2018 — July 18, 2018. St. Louis, Missouri

3rd Summer Institute to train the trainers in mentor and tutor training programs. The goal is to provide the training and tools for developing programs for mentors and tutors that meet professional standards and best practices. Attendees will have the opportunity to work in small groups and benefit from in-depth, personalized interaction with the instructors. FCSUA will be participate on the Institute as well as IHE team members from the FPCTP Project ACCESS at Florida Keys Community College, FPCTP STAGE at Indian River State College and the FPCTP Inclusive Education Services at University of Central Florida.

FCSUA participates as vendor at The 2018 Hartwick Symposium Series

July 12, 2018. University of Central Florida, Orlando

The Florida Centre for Students with Unique Abilities participated at The 2018 Annual Hartwick Symposium as a vendor. The 2018 Annual Hartwick Symposium Series is a set of annual symposiums conducted to meet the needs of students with intellectual disability, families, and professionals. The 2018 Annual Hartwick Symposium: Secondary and Family Focus will take place from 8:00 AM to 3:00 PM and from 4:00 PM to 8:00 PM respectively. The Family Focus Symposium is to inform families and students of postsecondary options and resources leading to employment and career opportunities for students with intellectual disability and the Secondary Symposium is for secondary educators to learn about Florida’s postsecondary options and resources for students with intellectual disability.

Dr. Paula Kohler’s presentation during the 2018 National APSE Conference

June 26, 2018 — June. 28, 2018. Disney’s Coronado Spring Resort, Lake Buena Vista, Florida

Dr. Paula Kohler, Executive Director of Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities will be offering the presentation: «Pathways to Success for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities through Postsecondary Education». The session will be part of the Transition From School to Adult Life Conference Strand.

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Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs Midyear Check and Connect Institute

June 20, 2018 — June. 21, 2018. Embassy Suites — Orlando North, 225 Shorecrest Drive, Altamonte Springs, FL 32701

This Midyear Check and Connect Institute is a follow-up to the Florida Postsecondary Education Program Planning Institute held in January 2018. The purpose of the Midyear Institute is to provide professional development and technical assistance to IHE teams to facilitate planning and implementation of Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs (FPCTP) for students with intellectual disabilities in all types of postsecondary education institutions: universities, state and community colleges, and career tech centers.

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Dr. W. Drew Andrews presentation during the 20th Anniversary Family Cafe

June 15, 2018. Hyatt Regency, Orlando, Florida

Dr. W. Drew Andrews, Technical Assistance Coordinator of Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities will offer the presentation: Realizing the Dream: Opportunities for Youth with Intellectual Disabilities in Postsecondary Education at The 20th Anniversary Family Cafe from 3:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Dr. Paula Kohler presentation during mpe2c Program Planning Institute

June 12, 2018 — June. 14, 2018. Kalamazoo, MI

Dr. Kohler’s presentation, «Building a Sustainable CTP», had the purpose of increase understanding of resources available for and facilitate planning and implementation of inclusive postsecondary education and employment programs for students with intellectual disabilities in all types of postsecondary education institutions.

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FCSUA participating as a vendor during 2018 Florida CASE Summer Leadership Institute

June 11, 2018 — June. 13, 2018. Hyatt Regency Coconut Point Resort & Spa, Bonita Springs, Florida

Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities (FCSUA) represented by the Technical Assistance Coordinator, Dr. W. Drew Andrew, will be participating at Florida CASE 21st Annual Summer Leadership Institute as a vendor. During the Institute, attendants will be able learn more FCSUA work to implement Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs (FPCTPs), the FPCTP Grants and Scholarships.

Dr. W. Drew Andrews presentation during the Gardiner Scholarship Networking Conference

June 8, 2018. The Paragon School. Orlando, Florida

Step Up For Students is Sponsoring a Gardiner Scholarship Networking Conference: “Effective Strategies for supporting Students with Unique Abilities” from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM. Dr. W. Drew Andrews, Technical Assistance Coordinator of Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities will offer a presentation during the conference. This event promises to be a day full of networking and information gathering in the areas of Legislative and Operational Updates, Teaching & Learning, Community Culture, and Transition Services to meet the needs of special needs students and their families.

Dr. Paula Kohler’s presentation during the 2018 FASFAA Training and Conference

May 30, 2018. Naples Grande Resort, Naples, Florida

The presentation will take place during the session 2 between 10:00 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. This session will provides information on the process schools can complete to qualify for support for students with intellectual disabilities. Specifically, how students in CTP programs can receive financial aid, including eligibility requirements for schools, programs and students.

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Dr. Paula Kohler’s presentation during the 2018 Florida College Access Network Summit

May 11, 2018. Hyatt Regency Orlando 9801 International Drive Orlando, Florida 32819

Dr. Paula Kohler, Executive Director of Florida Center Students with Unique Abilities offered the presentation: Expanding Access: Tap into Resources from the Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities (FCSUA), from 9:45 AM to 10:45 AM. The presentation provided an update on implementation of the Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Program (FPCTP) Act and resources available through the FCSUA. The presentation also included information from program annual reports regarding student characteristics, student services, credentials, and data collection regarding student success. Information will include strategies to build inclusive programs, recruit students, and address equity issues (such as under-representation of African American students in current FPCTPs).

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Dr. Paula Kohler’s presentation during 25th Annual VISIONS Conference

May 2, 2018 — May 4, 2018. Daytona Beach Hilton, Daytona Beach, FL

Dr. Paula Kohler, Executive Director of Florida Center Students with Unique Abilities offered the presentation: “Pathways to Employment: Postsecondary Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities”

Webinar: Completing your Federal Comprehensive Transition and Postsecondary Program Application

May 1, 2018. 3-4 PM

The webinar provided information on the application process involved in becoming a Comprehensive Transition and Postsecondary (CTP) Program. All Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs (FPCTPs) are required to apply to become CTP Programs. The webinar was hosted by Dr. Clare Papay from Think College. Follow the links below to see the slides related to the webinar and to see the webinar on FCSUA YouTube channel.

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Dr. W. Drew Andrews presentation during the 2018 Southeastern Postsecondary Education Alliance (SEPSEA) Capacity Building Institute

April 19, 2018 — April 20, 2018. University of Memphis, Memphis, TN

Dr. W. Drew Andrews, Technical Assistance Coordinator of Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities will offer the presentation: Pathways to Employment: Postsecondary Education Programs for Students with Intellectual Disabilities.

Dr. Paula Kohler’s presentation during the 19th Annual Narrowing the Gulf for Underrepresented Students in Postsecondary Education Conference

April 5, 2018. EpiCenter at St. Peterburg College. Clearwater, FL

Dr. Paula Kohler, Executive Director of Florida Center Students with Unique Abilities offered the presentation: Expanding Access: Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities from 11:10 a.m. to 12:10 p.m. during the 19th Annual Narrowing the Gulf for Underrepresented Students in Postsecondary Education Conference. The conference is co-sponsored by SPC’s Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning, Retention Services Department and the Florida Association of Higher Education and Disability (FL-AHEAD).

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Webinar: Building and Sustaining Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs

April 3, 2018. 3-4 PM

The webinar provided information on various revenue streams to support Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs (FPCTPs) and was hosted by Dr. Paula Kohler, Executive Director of the Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities. The webinar was recorded and will be posted on FCSUA YouTube channel. The slides related to the webinar are available to download below.

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UCF Black and Gold Challenge Autism Awareness Walk

March 17, 2018. UCF Track & Soccer Field 4275 East Plaza Drive Orlando, FL 32816

Visit the Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities (FCSUA) at the UCF Black and Gold Challenge Autism Awareness Walk. The event is Saturday March 17, 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the UCF Track and Soccer Field and features a variety of organizations and festivities. Visitors to our table will learn about the FCSUA and can make a Carnival mask to take home.

Dr. Paula Kohler’s presentation during the Florida College System: Council of Instructional Affairs and Council of Student Affairs Meeting

February 15, 2018. Crystal River, FL.

Creating Opportunities for Students with Intellectual Disabilities in Florida’s Colleges. Presentation offered by Dr. Paula Kohler at the Council of Instructional Affairs and Council of Student Affairs Meeting that took place on February 15-16, 2018 at Crystal River. Florida.

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Florida Postsecondary Education Program Planning Institute

January 24, 2018 — January 26, 2018. B Resort and Spa – 1905 Hotel Plaza Boulevard, Lake Buena Vista, FL

The purpose of this Institute is to increase understanding of resources available for and facilitate planning and implementation of Florida Postsecondary Comprehensive Transition Programs (FPCTP) for students with intellectual disabilities in all types of postsecondary education institutions: universities, state and community colleges, and career tech centers

Downloads:

Webinar for team leaders attending Florida Postsecondary Education Program Planning Institute

January 11, 2018.

Through this webinar, the center provided an overview of the institute format, the kinds of information that will be useful in team planning sessions, and equipment and other supplies you might consider bringing. It’s our experience that team leader participation in this webinar greatly enhances the Institute’s outcomes and impact for leaders and their teams.

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Holiday Festival hosted by the UCF Center for Autism and Related Disabilities

December 16, 2017. UCF Memory Mall

Visit the Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities at the Holiday Festival hosted by the UCF Center for Autism and Related Disabilities (CARD). The festival is Saturday December 16, 1pm to 4pm on the UCF Memory Mall. We are excited to represent Brazil in this multicultural holiday celebration. Visitors to our table will learn about the FCSUA and have a chance to make a Carnival mask or ornament. The event features other organizations and festivities

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Regional Professional Development and Technical Assistance Workshops

November 30, 2017. Gainesville, Panama City and Fort Myers

The purpose of these workshops was to address the immediate need for information regarding FCSUA resources and program development. Also we pretend to provide planning tools to help prepare postsecondary education staff and constituents to participate in the Florida Postsecondary Education Program Planning Institute. The workshops took place between October 25th and November 30th, 2017.

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Keynote at Annual Equity Conference: From Institutionalization to College and Careers: Your Role in Realizing Equity.

October 26, 2017 — October 27, 2017. Santa Fe College. Gainesville. FL

The Executive Director Paula Kohler emphasizes the importance of partnering with the Florida College System to improve the outcome of students with intellectual disabilities. Also the presentation had an overview of FCSUA at UCF and FPCTP resources.

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FPCTP scholarship requests, distribution and reporting — Part 2

FCSUA webinar about Florida Postsecondary Transition Program scholarship requests, distribution and reporting.

FPCTP scholarship requests, distribution and reporting — Part 1

FCSUA webinar about Florida Postsecondary Transition Program scholarship requests, distribution and reporting.

Florida College Access and Success Summit

May 10, 2017 — May 11, 2017. Lake Buena Vista, Orlando. Florida

Florida College Access Network brought together Florida leaders, educators and professionals representing K-12 education, higher education, non-profit organizations, philanthropy, business and government around a common agenda to drive access and success Postsecondary program for all students in Florida. Dr. Paula Kohler gave a conference about the aims pursued by the center, the FPCTP programs, scholarships and grant opportunities.

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FL DCDT Visions Conference- A Transition Planning Institute and Conference

May 3, 2017 — May 5, 2017. St. Petersburg Beach FL.

Dr. Paula Kohler offered a conference about FCSUA and the Florida Postsecondary Transition Programs.

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© 2020 Florida Center for Students with Unique Abilities.

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