How Mice Get In Basement

«The tried-and-true mousetrap is still very effective,» says Mannes, who adds that a little dab of peanut butter on each spring-loaded trap is all you need. Want something a little, um, less out in the open? Try the d-Con Discreet No View, No Touch mousetrap, which conceals the little guy so you can just toss the whole thing ($10 for 2, amazon.com).

When it comes to banishing rodents, the best defense is a good offense.

Fall and winter are prime time for rodents trying to make their way into warm, cozy homes, but it’s never too early to start mouse-proofing, according to Cindy Mannes, a spokeswoman for the National Pest Management Association.

Not only can they chew through walls and boxes in your pantry, but mice can wreak serious havoc on your home. Particularly, they can gnaw on wires, which can lead to house fires. «And they carry a slew of illnesses and bacteria,» Mannes warns. «A build-up of their droppings can worsen allergy and asthma situations, too.»

As a result of dropping temperatures, infestations tend to begin in fall. After a colony enters a structure and finds it to be safe and warm, they rarely venture outside again. Mice proliferate quickly and populations may exceed 200 specimens within a matter of months.

Mice enter homes through cracks and holes found in walls, floors and foundations. Homeowners commonly do not recognize mouse holes until other signs of infestation appear. Due to their body shape, mice are capable of fitting through holes much smaller than appear likely.

Mice may also enter the home through gaps in windows or ceilings, as well as through sewer lines. If drainage pipes are not properly sealed, mice may enter homes through sink or bathtub drains. They are also known to find their way inside via entry holes around plumbing and oven gas lines.

As a result of dropping temperatures, infestations tend to begin in fall. After a colony enters a structure and finds it to be safe and warm, they rarely venture outside again. Mice proliferate quickly and populations may exceed 200 specimens within a matter of months.

In order to prevent mice from entering the home, all cracks, openings and holes should be sealed with metal or cement. All doors and windows must close properly. Store foods in glass or metal containers with tight lids, and be certain to dispose of all food waste as soon as possible. Contact a pest control professional for help and additional solutions.

Remove harborage spots for mice. The less clutter, overgrown areas, and tall grass, the fewer places mice will find to hide in your yard. Keeping your yard neat and clean will deter mice from coming in close.

Why Do Mice Enter Basements?

When the weather outside turns frightful, mice may find your basement delightful. If there are any gaps, cracks, or holes to squeeze through into your basement, mice will take advantage of this. Here are a few tips that may help to keep them out.

Remove attractants from your yard. Make sure there are no food sources that are attracting mice to come in close to your home.

Seal trash. Remove pet food. Clean up garden or fruit tree areas.

Remove water sources. Fix leaky spigots and remove standing water from around your home.

Remove harborage spots for mice. The less clutter, overgrown areas, and tall grass, the fewer places mice will find to hide in your yard. Keeping your yard neat and clean will deter mice from coming in close.

Seal up your foundation and outer walls. Inspect your home for entry points and make repairs where appropriate. Pay attention to areas where pipes, wires, or other objects enter the home.

Remove food and water sources inside. Make sure all food is stored in sealed, sturdy containers, and fix any water leaks your home may have. If food and water are not available, mice will be less likely to stick around.

If you are dealing with d ifferent types of rats and mice in your basement, or other pests have invaded your home, the best course of action to get rid of them and keep them out is to partner with a professional pest control company. Here at Adams Exterminating Company, we use the most advanced methods to inspect, monitor, bait, trap, treat and pest-proof homes for rodent infestations. Reach out to Adams today for prompt assistance.

Field mice commonly hide in the basements of homes or businesses. Several pests like to live in secluded areas of buildings, but these rodents can be especially troublesome. It’s easy to confuse one for a house mouse, but a field mouse has larger eyes and ears, as well as a white belly and feet.

Could You Have a Field Mouse in the Basement?

Field mice commonly hide in the basements of homes or businesses. Several pests like to live in secluded areas of buildings, but these rodents can be especially troublesome. It’s easy to confuse one for a house mouse, but a field mouse has larger eyes and ears, as well as a white belly and feet.

See also:  How Keep Mice Out Of Garage

Behavior

While you might have field mice in the house, they do not always remain indoors. Preferring overgrown grass, sheds, and barns, these pests usually come inside seeking shelter during poor weather or to find meals. You may also hear scratching and chewing sounds at night when there are field mice in the basement.

Dangers of a Field Mouse Infestation

Since field mice enter and exit frequently, these pests could bring in fleas and ticks. These parasites can transmit harmful bacteria, such as those that cause Lyme disease. You can also contract hantavirus, a dangerous respiratory infection, if you inhale the dust particles from dried droppings and urine.

A field mouse in the house can cause damage, too. This pest often shreds insulation, furniture, or cardboard to build nests. They may also chew on electrical wiring, creating a fire hazard. Plus, field mice sometimes move into kitchens and break rooms where they eat and contaminate food.

Prevention

There are a few things you can do to deter field mice. Fill holes where pipes and cables attach to buildings. If you store food in the cellar, make sure all packaging is air-tight and sealed. Unfortunately, when there is one field mouse in the basement, the odds are that you have more, so call the experts at Western Pest Services for a consultation or contact us online.

Trees and bushes, power lines or cables, latticework can provide ladders to help mice find easy access to your home. Mice can also climb walls, including brick and many other surfaces. Mice are good jumpers, too!

Mice love your home for many of the same reasons you do. It’s warm, charming, safe and convenient. It’s a great place to raise a family, and it’s a great place for mice to breed. Your home has everything a mouse needs to survive: Food, shelter and water.

It’s true that rodent issues are more common winter pest problems, but they are not only a problem when it’s cold outside. Mice are found in homes year-round.

Your home is also safer and more convenient than living outside, where they face threats from predators and challenge of finding food.

Mice are drawn to homes for three simple reasons: Houses are warm, safe and stocked with food. When mice infest a home, they’ll generally use the darkest corridors – such as air ducts, crawl spaces and wall cavities – to run around in search of food. Mice can climb walls and slip through holes the size of a small coin, so there’s really no stopping them if they go undetected.

Evidence of Mice in Your Home

Mice in Crawl Spaces

When mice make their way into your crawl space, they’ve found an ideal home; a dark space to sleep all day, from where they can access various holes and ducts to your kitchen at night. If your house is situated near any densities of wild mice, your crawl space was likely a target from day one. Of course, mice generally have the advantage when it comes to crawl spaces, since it’s an area that’s dark, narrow and rarely checked by homeowners.

How to Remove Rodents From Air Ducts

Air ducts are among the likely areas that mice will cluster and sleep between their travels and meals. When mice die in the heating and cooling ducts, it can send a rank odor throughout a house. If mice have invaded your air ducts, the following steps can help you end the problem.

Switch off your central heating and cooling system and let the grates reach room temperature. Unscrew and remove the grates that cover your heat vents.

For each vent, bait a snap trap, such as our Victor® Power-Kill™ Mouse Trap, with the fragrances of fetching foods, such as raisins, dates, cheese, chocolate or peanut butter.

Place a trap in each air duct. If you can spot any trails of mouse prints or droppings, place the trap directly along those lines. Reattach the vent grates and reactivate your heating system.

Every morning, take a flashlight to the vents and inspect each trap for mice. If any mice have been caught, unscrew the grate and remove the trap. Put on rubber gloves, place the mouse in a zip-lock bag and throw it away. You can also take the work out of checking your traps by using our Smart-Kill™ Wi-Fi Electronic Mouse Trap and recieve an alert on your phone once a mouse is caught.

After disinfecting your hands, return the scented trap to the air duct, reattach the vent grate and keep checking each morning for further trapped mice. Repeat the process until the mice have been eliminated.

To prevent this type of infestation from reoccurring, seal off any small holes that could possibly give rodents entryways into your home. Inspect the vents throughout your house for slivers between the ducts and the roofs or walls. Cover these gaps with mesh wire to block rodents from slipping through. The same should be done on any other gaps that might serve as entrances for mice, such as slivers around the sides of door knobs, window frames and rafters.

How to Get Mice Out of Walls

Killing Mice in Walls

To paraphrase Murphy’s Law, there’s always one more mouse. It could be a case where mice are entering your house through the eaves and getting trapped inside the wall cavities. Here’s how to get rid of mice in walls:

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To prevent this type of infestation from reoccurring, seal off any small holes that could possibly give rodents entryways into your home. Inspect the vents throughout your house for slivers between the ducts and the roofs or walls. Cover these gaps with mesh wire to block rodents from slipping through. The same should be done on any other gaps that might serve as entrances for mice, such as slivers around the sides of door knobs, window frames and rafters.

Once you feel confident that you’ve beat the problem, patch the hole in the drywall with sealant, and be sure to inspect the eaves of your house for spots where mice could have possibly slipped through. Once everything is sealed, prevent mice from returning by utilizing a ultrasonic repellent, like our Ultra PestChaser® and keep them away. For more information on how to rodent proof your home, check out our complete guide here.

Dead Mice in Walls

Kill Mice Once and for All

When there’s evidence of mice in your home, it’s important to isolate the root of the problem, seal off the entryways and prevent the matter from spreading any further. Whether it’s a matter of mice in crawl spaces, air ducts, or even live or dead mice in walls, glue trays, snap traps and ultrasonic pest control units can help.

One of the best anti-rodent products on the market is the Victor® Kill Vault™ Mouse Trap, the no-touch, no-see, no-cleanup, easy-to-use unit that kills mice quickly and effectively. If mice invade your home, their final stop will be the Kill Vault™.

As the days continue to get colder, things are just starting to heat up in your walls. Mice are moving indoors to stay warm and well-fed during the chilly winter months. These common household pests may be small, but they can cause HUGE headaches for homeowners. Not only can mice contaminate food and surfaces with salmonella and other bacteria, but these critters and their droppings are vectors for the hantavirus. Mice can also bring fleas, ticks and other parasites into your home.

1. Corner Posts and J-Channels

Corner posts are used to finish off the ends of siding at the corners of your house, and j-channels are used like trim around windows and doors to hide the ends of vinyl siding. The hollow corner posts make it easy for mice to climb up the side of your house and the gaps between j-channels and siding are often large enough for mice to get in behind the siding.

Solution

Use S.O.S steel wool pads or Chore Boy copper mesh to fill any openings in the corner posts or j-channels and seal with silicone caulk.

Find their entry point: After you have done a thorough inspection inside the basement, look for the entry point that the mice use. If you notice any opening to your basement, make sure that you seal it. Remember that mice can squeeze their bodies and enter through even the tiniest whole. You should therefore ensure that there isn’t a single crack in your basement that can let in mice

Find their entry point: After you have done a thorough inspection inside the basement, look for the entry point that the mice use. If you notice any opening to your basement, make sure that you seal it. Remember that mice can squeeze their bodies and enter through even the tiniest whole. You should therefore ensure that there isn’t a single crack in your basement that can let in mice

Get rid of clutter: Mice are likely to enter your basement if it is cluttered with very many hidden places that they can hide and make their nest. Make sure that you clean the basement and get rid of all the clutter. Ensure that your basement is getting sufficient lighting that will discourage the mice from multiplying.

Use natural methods to get rid of the mice: If you do not want to use poison or other chemical based products, you can use natural methods such as:
Applying peppermint oil or other strong scents on cotton balls and leaving around the basement. Mice cannot take such strong scents. Alternatively, you can plant strong smelling plants around the basement to keep off the mice.

Take your cat to the basement: If you have a cat, take it with you to the basement. The moment the mice smell the presence of the cat, they will flee.
Set traps: Another way of getting rid of mice in the basement is by setting traps. Once you have inspected the basement, you can estimate how bad the infestation is, and how many traps you will need to completely get rid of them.

Call an exterminator: If you feel that the mice situation is too serious for you to eliminate on your own, you can get help from professional exterminators., They will access the situation and know the best way to completely remove the mice.

Always remember that the sooner you deal with the mice menace, the better. Mice multiply very fast, and if left for long, they can be extremely difficult to eliminate, especially if they are in the basement.

Nonlethal traps are widely available, inexpensive, and easy to use. Sold in hardware stores, as well as in PETA’s catalog, they consist of a boxlike plastic or metal trap with a springrelease door that closes behind the animal once he or she enters the trap. Check the trap every hour, and if you find an animal, simply release him or her in a suitable location outside.

If you see glue traps at a store, complain to the manager! Ask them to only carry humane traps (available at PETACatalog.org).

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Nonlethal traps are widely available, inexpensive, and easy to use. Sold in hardware stores, as well as in PETA’s catalog, they consist of a boxlike plastic or metal trap with a springrelease door that closes behind the animal once he or she enters the trap. Check the trap every hour, and if you find an animal, simply release him or her in a suitable location outside.

You also must make your home less attractive to mice. Start by doing a thorough sweep of your house. Make sure there is no food left in open places or in cardboard containers, which mice can eat right through. Keep garbage in tightly covered containers. Remove mice shelters by keeping storage spaces orderly and keeping stored items off the floor.

Next, deny mice a way to enter your home by sealing holes around the bottom of walls—even small ones, since a mouse can wriggle through a hole no larger than a quarter. Seal holes in exterior walls, as well.

With a little bit of effort, you can live mousefree without cruelty!

Let’s say you wake up one night to the sound of scratching noises emanating from somewhere between your home’s first floor ceiling and the second floor’s floor. Likely, it’s a mouse problem. But what can you do about it?

I Have Mice in My Basement: What Should I Do?

You can’t afford to ignore mice in you basement. They will spread from there to other parts of your house, bringing their diseases and disgusting, destructive ways with them.

But neither do you necessarily have to pay out big bucks to a professional mouse exterminator.

First of all, realize that basement mice are a common problem, in both city and country alike. So don’t panic. But second of all, put a well thought out extermination plan into action (more on that just below.)

Click the link to learn more about how a mice infestation gets started and grows – and how you can end it!

You can follow a simple 4-step plan to get rid of “cellar-dweller” mice:

  1. Clean your basement thoroughly, removing old junk, debris, and clutter. And clean contaminated surfaces with bleach water to disinfect. Also clear away weeds and debris on the outside of the house.
  2. Inspect and seal. Find cracks/holes in the foundation or floor and seal them with cement patch or a ball of steel wool. Also seal up any inviting openings on the exterior perimeter of your house.
  3. Don’t forget to put weather stripping on your basement door to keep basement mice from graduating to “all-house mice.”

Even after you’ve rid your basement of mice, that smell may still continue. Click here to learn how to get rid of dead mouse smell.

Best spots for traps: Along walls; anywhere you suspect activity.

Depending on where you live, you may get a drop-in (or burrow-in or slither-in) visit from one of these:

Skunks: These four-legged stink bombs will easily burrow under your patio slab or stake out territory in your garage, crawl space, or basement. Hire a pro to trap them live and transport them elsewhere.

Bats: Given the opportunity, they’ll happily take up residence in your attic for the summer and leave behind potentially disease-ridden guano as a present. Seal off their entranceways with a double layer of insect screen and hardware cloth, but only after you evict them first (Bat species are protected nationwide). Call in a pro to erect a «bat flap,» a layer of screen that lets the bats crawl out but blocks their way back in.

Birds: In spring, starlings and sparrows have a knack for building nests in hidden, difficult-to-reach openings in a house. The louvered vents for dryer exhausts and the openings behind roof fascia are perennial favorites. Bar them from entering with hardware cloth. Take down the bird feeders that are attracting them to your property.

Raccoons: The masked marauders of the animal world, they’ll barge down chimneys and into open garages or attic vents. Best captured with a live trap baited with peanut butter, suet, raw eggs, or dried corn on the cob. To keep them from coming back, cap your chimney, keep basement and garage doors closed, eliminate bird feeders and outdoor pet bowls, and lock down trash lids with bungee cords.

Snakes: In the fall, they’ll work their way into openings around basement doors or cracks in foundation mortar, looking for a place to hibernate. They’ll leave of their own accord when the weather warms up in spring. Seal those openings behind them.

Opossums: You’ll occasionally find these nocturnal fruit-and-insect eaters camped out under your deck or blundering into open garages, basements, and crawl spaces. They won’t stay, unless they think you’re going to feed them. As with skunks, you’ll need a pro to capture them and ferry them out of the neighborhood.

Check out some of our best pest control resources to keep rodents out of your home.

Source
http://www.goodhousekeeping.com/home/cleaning/a35872/how-to-get-rid-of-mice/
http://www.orkin.com/rodents/mouse-control/how-mice-enter-homes
http://www.adamspest.com/blog/post/preventing-mice-in-my-basement
http://www.westernpest.com/blog/field-mice-in-basement/
http://www.mypestpros.com/pest-control-tips/mice-getting-home/
http://www.victorpest.com/advice/how-to/get-rid-of-mice-in-your-walls
http://www.catseyepest.com/blog/7-ways-mice-are-getting-your-house
http://www.mousecontrol.ca/blog/mice-basement/
http://www.peta.org/about-peta/faq/there-are-mice-living-in-my-basement-i-dont-want-them-there-but-all-i-can-find-at-the-store-are-glue-traps-poison-and-mousetraps-do-i-have-any-other-options/
http://pestkill.org/mice/in-basement-and-ceiling/
http://www.thisoldhouse.com/pest-control/21014855/how-animals-are-getting-into-your-house
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