How Do Mice Get In Attic Uk

Noises in the attic are worrying and can be an indication that rodents or other wildlife may be living in your roof.

Noises in the attic are worrying and can be an indication that rodents or other wildlife may be living in your roof.

Attics (lofts) are ideal environments for squirrels and rodents, who damage stored items by gnawing and possibly cause fire hazards by chewing electric cabling. Noises should be investigated quickly, nests and droppings become ideal breeding sites for insects, which may then carry nasty bugs and diseases into your home.

Inspect your attic and look closely for visible signs of habitation, commonly their droppings, signs of nesting and possible damage caused by gnawing.

Homeowners and tenants across the country will be dreading the patter of tiny feet above their heads as rats, mice and squirrels take refuge from the cooler weather in loft spaces.

Homeowners and tenants across the country will be dreading the patter of tiny feet above their heads as rats, mice and squirrels take refuge from the cooler weather in loft spaces.

As they scratch, gnaw and rip items apart to make nesting materials, the rodents cause many sleepless nights. They also chew through electrical cables which can cause fires as well as cause structural damage, not to mention the urine and droppings they leave all over any precious possessions being stored in the attic.

1) Checking around the outside wall to make sure that any air bricks are intact – the larger Victorian airbricks often have gaps large enough to allow mice in. Fine mesh panels can be fitted over the airbricks to stop unwelcome visitors entering.

2) Removing kick plates from the bottom of kitchen units, cleaning out any food debris that may have collected beneath them and checking for any signs of mouse droppings. With a single mouse producing up to 80 droppings per day, they will be easy to see. If you do find droppings, clean them up so that you can spot any new ones.

3) Go under the stair cupboard and have a clear out. Quite often, the gas pipes and other services come through the floorboards under the stairs and these cupboards become storage ‘glory holes’ for all manner of rubbish and provide an undisturbed area for mice to overwinter.

4) A quick check of loft spaces is recommended before winter sets in.

Are you hearing noises overhead? Are you smelling smells? Are you seeing signs that you may have mice in your attic? It isn’t surprising. Mice love attic spaces for many reasons. Let’s take a look some of those reasons, and see if we can find some real solutions that will work to keep your attic rodent-free.�

How do I get rid of mice in the attic?

If you have mice in your attic, or anywhere for that matter, it is best to call a professional pest control company to take care of the problem. Not only are mice difficult to get rid of, it is important that all of the mice are completely removed and their entry points discovered and sealed.

Adam’s Pest Control is a QualityPro-certified pest control company that services Minneapolis and the Twin Cities area as well as communities throughout Minnesota and Western Wisconsin.� Our team of highly trained professionals specialize in rodent control and are here to help you get rid of mice that have infested your home. Contact us today to learn more!

DIAMOND PEST CONTROL

The signs of rats in your loft are easy to spot if you know what you’re looking for. Or if you realise you even need to look. But rats in UK attics often go unnoticed until they start to invade other areas of the home. There are several different signs you can keep your eye out for to help you find out if rats are infesting your attic.

If you do find any rats in the loft, remember you need to deal with them as soon as possible.

Rats can find their way into other areas of your home and contaminate food sources. Even if they only stay in the loft, diseases can be spread through the ventilation system of your home. Here are some simple ways to find out if you have a rat infestation in your attic.

• Noises

Rats are active at night. There are some things that can cause them to wake during the day, such as bad weather or loud noises. Pay close attention to any noises you hear that are coming from your loft at night. This is when rats will be looking for food and building their nests. Scuffling sounds are one of the signs of rats in loft spaces. You can always leave a small recording device in the loft if you don’t fancy staying up all night.

• Chew marks and footprints

Gnaw markings and rat droppings around your home are a definite sign of a rat problem. Any hard surface will be gnawed on by a rat. Electrical wires are also another one of their favourite things to chew. If you’re not finding obvious signs of rats, lay some talcum powder down. Inspect if there are footprints over the next few days.

• Droppings

Another one of the clear signs of rats in loft or attic voids is droppings. Rats will leave a trail of faeces if they’re scurrying around your attic. It’s most common to find them around food sources. In the loft, you will find droppings around where the rats are nesting. You can also look for rat urine using a black light. You’ll be horrified by how much rat urine can get all over kitchen work surfaces and utensils.

• Possible entry points

Look around your attic for possible signs of entry. Rats can fit through small openings. Check the whole loft for spots a rat may have entered from. Preventing rats from getting in in the first place can save you a lot of time and money further down the road.

Remember that if you are suffering from a rat control problem you need to get in touch with a professional pest control company. Only they can fully eradicate a rat problem and ensure that rats don’t enter your property again. At the first signs of rats in loft or anywhere else, give Diamond a call. We will come out promptly.

It’s more likely to be MICE and quite possibly a lot of them (friend had rats and pest controller estimated there were also around 300 mice in the house!!) We had good success with poison, but if you’ve got a lot it will take a while to get rid of them.

It’s driving us crazy.
It’s got in somehow, and is living in the walls/loft.

We’ve tried poison, traps, plug things. we don’t know what else to do. it’s driving us crazy!

What poison have you tried and are you baiting the traps? Peanut butter is great. ROHBAN is fantastic poison and very strong. Noisy little things aren’t they?!

You can sprinkle talc on the floor and look where it’s disturbed and you might be able to see its ‘run.’

The traps need to go along the side of the walls.

And it won’t be just one btw!

It’s more likely to be MICE and quite possibly a lot of them (friend had rats and pest controller estimated there were also around 300 mice in the house!!) We had good success with poison, but if you’ve got a lot it will take a while to get rid of them.

Are you sure it’s a mouse and not bats, or other birds like swallows/house martins, or even birds roosting on the outside of your roof? The pigeons and magpies that like to roost on our roof sound like a ton of bricks being dropped when they come in to land.

See also:  How Keep Mice Out Of Garage

Get the professionals in. Mice can be quite tricky, as they will be living indoors (rats tend to be popping in for a visit).

Lots of poison and lots of traps and check them daily. Remove all food sources and anything they can make bedding out of. Block up visible holes. It’s not rocket science and there is nothing that professionals do that you can’t do yourself.

Could be a squirrel?

Yes to mice and not mouse!

Neosorexa gold is an excellent mouse poison.

Have you found droppings in your house?

We’ve had a professional in — he says he thinks it is just one mouse — as there is not a lot of droppings — eugh!
It doesn’t seem to be going in and out, it’s just staying in!
It hasn’t got into the actual house — but did get into a kitchen cupboard via the hole for the plug — eugh again. We have emptied that cupboard and bleached it.

So it’s now just moving about the loft and walls!

We’ve tried the blocks of poison, and the pellet things — nothing seems to be working — we also have 4 different types of trap now in the loft — still nothing works!

The professional told us it’s just a matter of time, but there is nothing more we do.

Thankfully DD is not getting freaked out abut it. yet.

Can you borrow a cat for a few days? Even if it doesn’t catch the mouse, the smell of the cat is sometimes enough to convince the rodent to relocate.

Apparently one tracker mouse goes in to check out your place before others come in. The only thing we found effective is those sticky traps . — not nice to deal with but often mice are just to light to trip the traps.. I have seen one hop over one — seriously they are clever buggers

My husband did joke that we should get a cat!
I’ve just looked up those ‘sticky traps’ — they don’t look nice, but my just be our last hope. will talk to dh about it!
Our mouse has set off our traps a few times, but there is never anything in them!

Please don’t try the glue traps. Mice will stick on them and gnaw their limbs off to escape. Cruel and not nice to have to clean up.

Poison should definitely work — that’s what the professionals use. It got rid of our mice in house and attic. Takes about a week though.

cats don’t work ime — we have three and mice still come into our loft

poison always sorts it out but takes a few days

Did this professional not put any poison down?

Poison is the only thing that works IME. traps can only catch so many mice and im surprised that he said its just one mouse!

They breed something like every 3 weeks and are sexually mature at about 8 weeks or something equally young.

They are not lone creatures.

We have mice lots of mice it sounds like they’re bowling in clogs, if it can’t go anywhere and there is only one it will probably just die in the wall of natural causes, the area of the house it dies in will smell for a week or so and then that will be it. Our mice come and go, they come in over winter and hibernate, have young in the spring, head back outside late spring and then the adults return late autumn for hibernation. If its not getting in the house just try living with it.

I had mice, I caught plenty in traps (baited with chocolate) but only prison got rid of them, which is a pity because I thought the traps were more humane).

Rodents are usually identified by their droppings or the sound of crawling, scratching and gnawing, although can also be identified by chewed wires or pipes. In general, rats are more audible than mice and you are less likely to hear the latter crawling. Brown rat’s droppings are the largest between 1.5-2cm, black rat’s up to 1.5cm and mice less than 0.75cm. If you are having trouble locating your intruders, you can use rodent tracker dust to identify their comings and goings and aid trap placement.

Rats in the loft are a worrying sign for any homeowner due to their propensity to spread disease, damage property and steal food. Worse, rodents in the loft indicate that they have spread deep into the property, forming a network throughout your walls. To deal with rodents it is can be useful to first identify the type of rodent before addressing structural issues and then dealing with the rodents themselves.

Types of Rodent

The two rats can be distinguished by their length, weight, body proportions and facial features with the brown rat significantly larger (40 vs 24cm long) and heavier (500 vs 200g) with small ears and eyes and a slanted snout. By contrast, the black rat possesses large ears and eyes and a pointed snout. Unsurprisingly, its body is slender with its tail longer than the rest of its body, hence the difference in weight. The brown rat is the opposite with a thick body and tail shorter than the rest of its body.

Rattus rattus is the scientific name for the black rat, and Rattus norvegicus for the brown rat. Picture credit: Sponk licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

Of mice, the most common species found in UK homes is the house mouse followed by the closely related field and yellow-necked field mouse. The house mouse is particularly problematic as it can enter dwellings at any point of the year. Concentrated in rural areas, the field mouse will rarely enter homes, although may pose a problem to farm buildings. The house mouse can easily be distinguished from the field mouse by its colour with the former grey and the latter a sandy-orange.

A visual comparison of the field (L) and house mouse (R). Note the difference in colour. Picture credit: Hans Hillewaert licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0.

Significantly smaller than rats, mice can survive on a mere 3 grams of food a day and even go without water for significant periods. They are all excellent climbers and can multiply quickly. The house mouse, for example, can produce up to 8 litters a year with a gestation period of only 30 days. Hence, we recommend you act quickly to solve any rodent problem.

Safety Precautions

Rodents carry a wide range of diseases, some of which are deadly and others airbourne. Hence, other than wearing gloves and using a facemask, we recommend you air out any space before removing carcasses or excrements.

Detection

Rodents are usually identified by their droppings or the sound of crawling, scratching and gnawing, although can also be identified by chewed wires or pipes. In general, rats are more audible than mice and you are less likely to hear the latter crawling. Brown rat’s droppings are the largest between 1.5-2cm, black rat’s up to 1.5cm and mice less than 0.75cm. If you are having trouble locating your intruders, you can use rodent tracker dust to identify their comings and goings and aid trap placement.

Addressing Structural Issues

Rodents, along with other pests, can enter your property through small cracks in the brickwork. They can enter your property through climbing shrubs and trees, and black rats may enter your loft directly. Hence, we recommend you seal any cracks with insulation foam and cut back overgrown plants. Rodents will often first take interest in a home due to overgrown gardens and easy access to waste. Hence, it is important to keep your rubbish tidied away.

Solutions

Our battery-powered ultrasonic rodent repeller is perfect for lofts and camouflages as a smoke alarm.

Clinical solutions include mouse and glue traps. In the vast majority of cases a mouse trap will kill a rodent instantly, so they are humane in a sense. Glue traps are extremely effective and work great in tandem with conventional traps. However, the major problem with clinical solutions is that they rarely provide a long term solution as killing existing rodents simply makes room for new ones. Hence, we recommend you start with any ultrasonic repellent, before moving onto these solutions.

If you are using ultrasonic repellents, it is important to first give it time to work and then seal cracks in your property to allow room for the rodents to escape. If you plan to just use just clinical solutions, it is important to first seal your property. Ultimately, it can be useful to use all three solutions in tandem that have proven to be highly effective in dealing with the worst problems, and significantly cheaper than relying on professional pest control solutions.

Jorge works in the Primrose marketing team. He is an avid reader, although struggles to stick to one topic!

His ideal afternoon would involve a long walk, before settling down for scones.

See also:  How Mice Come Into The House

Jorge is a journeyman gardener with experience in growing crops.

If you have silverfish, you won’t hear them but you will certainly see them scurrying around in the dark when you enter your loft. Silverfish enjoy moist areas and because your attic is an uninhabited room, it’s likely that there’s a little damp – an ideal place for them to reside and enjoy starchy foods such as old books.

Squirrels

How to get rid of squirrels in your loft

Never use poison to get rid of squirrels and their nests, it’s illegal and inhumane. When dealing with squirrels in the loft it’s much better to use traps/cages or exclusion doors – better yet, call a professional who can remove all squirrels and squirrel nests from your loft, safely and professionally. To prevent them from returning, cover all entrances and cut trees that are close by.

How to get rid of mice in your loft

To help you get rid of mice in the attic, mouse traps and poison are readily available on the high street; however, this just gets rid of the immediate mice and not the nest. Turn to a professional team who can ensure that your pest problem is completely eradicated, so that your home is safe and your family, healthy.

Rats

How to get rid of rats in your loft

Normal mouse traps can often be too small for rats, so live traps or calling out a professional exterminator are your best options to get rid of rats in the attic. It’s vital to get rid of rats as soon as you notice the signs because they can be extremely damaging to your home and health.

It’s unlikely that you will hear a bat in your loft as they will fly to the high rafters, so you’re more likely to see one when they make their way into your living area during the night time. The only time you may hear noises is if a bat gets stuck within a wall, as you may hear scratching if they fall or hit the wall whilst trying to get out. If you go out at night time, you may even be able to see the bats flying to and from your roof – this will give you a good indication of their access areas.

How to get rid of bats from your loft

Bees & Wasps

Humming sounds might be heard if there’s a large nest of wasps or bees in your attic. Their nests can be as big as the size of a football, so it’s possible you will hear a dull buzzing sound if you get close. This being said, it is important not to get too close or threaten them as they can sting you multiple times, so beware if you have wasp allergies!

How to get rid of bees and wasps in the loft

If you hear you have bees or wasps in the loft, what’s best to do? The last thing you want to be doing is trying to remove a wasps nest without any experience or any protective wear. In the case of wasps or bees, it’s best to leave it to the experts who will be able to remove them from hard-to-reach-places without causing any danger to you and your family.

Birds

Frantic flapping and tweeting sounds are a telltale sound of a bird in your attic. Although they’re not as big a threat as mice and rats, birds can ruin your roof and tiles so it’s important to help release them back outside. Birds have a very distinct sound if they’re stuck in your loft, they will call out repeatedly.

How to get rid of birds in the loft

What’s best to do with birds in your loft is trap them and remove them. This can be done easily, simply fill a bowl with bird feed, pop it into a cage trap and wait for them to fly inside. Once they are in, close the cage shut and let them go outside. You will want to cover any entrances to ensure that they do not come back to your attic, and always contact a pest professional if you are unable to deal with the problem safely and effectively yourself.

Silverfish

If you have silverfish, you won’t hear them but you will certainly see them scurrying around in the dark when you enter your loft. Silverfish enjoy moist areas and because your attic is an uninhabited room, it’s likely that there’s a little damp – an ideal place for them to reside and enjoy starchy foods such as old books.

How to get rid of silverfish from your loft

Check for any leaks and have them fixed, cover any cracks in foundations and ensure that you have a tight, secure attic. Next, remove their food source, this includes clothes, books and cardboard. Alternatively, place these items into plastic containers rather than cardboard boxes because they will make good work of this delicious treat. Lastly, hoover and use a dehumidifier to extract any moisture in your attic.

Flies

Like bees and wasps, you may hear buzzing coming from your attic and this can certainly send shivers down your spine. Flies live for a maximum of 30 days but during this time, they can lay around 400 to 600 eggs, leading to a huge infestation. Flies very much enjoy areas where the moisture levels are high and are attracted by nearby food, so your outside bins for example, could be their local restaurant.

How to get rid of flies from your loft

Remove the moisture from the air, get a dehumidifier to do this. Cover all food, keep everything clean and keep your outdoor bins shut properly.


Once you have managed to get rid of your pests, you must cover up all accessible entries, to reduce the risk of this happening again.

Here at Pest Defence we hope to put your minds at ease. Hearing sounds from the attic isn’t a nice experience, so listen out and get the problem solved as soon as possible. We’re a team of fully qualified and accredited professionals that provide same day emergency response. Our team have been established since 1989 and we’re local authority and trading standards approved. If you wish for any other information or have a problem with pests, give our professionals a call today!

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Once you are certain that you have sealed everything; you may proceed to trapping and removing the mice that are already living in your attic.

If you have confirmed that there are mice in the attic, then perhaps the best way to get rid of mice in an attic is to follow the steps below.

Step #1: Examine your whole house.

Look for any open gaps and holes, such as gaps underneath the eaves, in roof lines or vents that mice might be using to enter into the attic.

These gaps or holes will be very small, perhaps the size of a dime or a quarter of an inch. You will have to pay tremendous attention to detail. A black-light can also be used to look for mice urine, which can help discover possible entry points they might be using.

Step #2: Block off the entry points.

Use steel wool to seal up all of the entry gaps and holes, so that mice are not able to chew through them again. The steel can be bolted in place or secured with clear silicone gel.

The sealant also helps to block off the airflow alerting the mouse to new pathways in your house. Mice tend to follow the smells carried by air to enter through a gap or a hole, so this will further discourage them from getting into your attic.

Step #3: Trap or kill the mice.

Once you are certain that you have sealed everything; you may proceed to trapping and removing the mice that are already living in your attic.

Setting mouse traps is the most inexpensive way of getting rid of mice in the attic. However, if you do not want to kill the mice and you want the cleanup process to be less messy, instead of snap traps, consider using a live catch trap:

  • Live-catch traps: The mice will get trapped inside these traps, and you can then release them into the wild. The most humane type of live catch traps are large enough to allow the mouse to move a bit with large air holes, so the mouse can get plenty of air while waiting to be released. The Havahart mouse trap is a popular brand.
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However, keep in mind that if you have not sealed your attic and house properly, more mice may return in the future.

Step #4: Cleanup and Removal

Finally, you may clean up and remove all of the droppings and nests you found in the attic. Be sure to wear gloves during the cleanup process. You will want to throw away any chewed boxes. Take this opportunity to also remove any clutter, so it is easier to see if the mice have returned.

Hiring a Contractor is often the Best Way to Get Rid of Mice in the Attic

As you can see, to be truly successful in getting rid of mice, it does take a bit of work. You can of course simply lay out the traps & hope the mice don’t return but this rarely works.

If you don’t seal the house & block off their entryways, new mice will almost always find their way back into your home. Then you have to start all over again.

A contractor can help you mouse-proof the house & get rid of the mice fast.

If you simply don’t have the time and resources to do it yourself, consider hiring either a pest control expert or a handyman. It may cost a bit more upfront, but in the long run, it will save you money and you can safely rest that your home has been secured by a professional.

You could try one of these, someone posted the clip on bff back last year, since then our dryer/quarry manager has made several and had more than 40 in one bucket in a night, it works well and you can either drown the there & then or take them for a nice ride out of the area and release them!!

Certainly can recommend one of these.

‘Uses ultrasound and electromagnetic technologies. Covers the whole house (up to 2000 sq ft.). Effective against mice, rats, ants and most crawling insects while not affecting humans or most pets. Includes mosquito setting. Direct plug-in design.’

Pest Stop is certainly the make I used, more like in the first link. Worked well for me and my parents had a problem in their attic space and borrowed mine, cleared the problem & bought their own to keep the area clear.

Inspect your attic for tunnelling, especially if your house has blown in insulation. Mice often tunnel in materials like this and can even get behind fiberglass insulation in order to keep them warm while they are nesting. Mice are fearful so if they can hide their whereabouts they will do so — especially when they hear you coming.

The mice can find their way inside other areas of your house, and can contaminate food sources, and; Even if they only stay in the attic space, their feces can spread disease through the ventilation systems in your home.

Here are 5 simple ways to find out if you have mice taking up residence in your attic:

(5) Noise

(4) Look For Chew Marks & Footprints

You may notice recent gnaw markings, as well as fresh mouse droppings around your house and attic space. Gnaw marks can be found on just about every hard surface, such as your floor, rafters in the ceiling, house siding, electrical wires, ventilation ducts and areas around pipes inside your walls. TIP: If you can’t find any obvious signs of chewing, simply sprinkle talcum powder on your attic floor and inspect for footprints over the following few days.

(3) Look For Signs Of Mice Tunnelling

Inspect your attic for tunnelling, especially if your house has blown in insulation. Mice often tunnel in materials like this and can even get behind fiberglass insulation in order to keep them warm while they are nesting. Mice are fearful so if they can hide their whereabouts they will do so — especially when they hear you coming.

(2) Look For The Source

Look around your house and attic for signs of entry. Mice can fit into very small openings (even holes that appear smaller than their bodies!) Try thinking like a mouse and check your entire attic for spots where they may have entered from. Preventing mice from getting inside your house is a great way to save you time and money in the future by taking a few proactive steps. TIP: If you find any holes bigger than a dime, you’ve most likely got company.

(1) The Obvious Giveaway — Droppings

Mice will leave a trail of faeces while they are scurrying around your house going about their business. Their droppings are very small, oval shaped and pointed at one end. It’s common to find mouse faeces near food sources, but in your attic it’s likely you’ll find them near their nesting spots. The only way to find mouse urine is to use a black light, and it’s horrifying to find out how much mouse urine is all over food prep areas and utensils.

So You’ve Got Mice In Your Attic, What Next?

Always keep a clean and tidy household (take the rubbish out often) If you notice a hole in your home’s exterior, seal it up straight away. Regularly inspect your attic to ensure there are no growing pest infestations.

Mouse-proof your food storage areas. Store dried grain and meats in metal canisters, glass jars or other tightly sealed containers.

In a single year, a female mouse can reproduce every three to four weeks and give birth to five to twelve babies each time. Mice are more than just a nuisance. They eat and contaminate food and damage structures and belongings. They chew through insulation, paper goods, clothes and electrical wiring, creating a fire hazard. Mice can carry bacteria that cause diseases such as salmonella poisoning.

Removal of mice starts with recognizing the noise and other signs of mice. Here’s a checklist for how to identify and get rid of mice in the attic:

Identify the noise of mice in the attic. Listen for the scratching sounds of tiny feet. If you don’t hear sounds indicating mice in the attic, that doesn’t mean they aren’t there. When they’re being “quiet as a mouse,” they don’t make much noise. Look for these signs of mice in the attic:

Mouse droppings. (Look for a trail of tiny black pellets about the size of rice grains.)

Mouse nests made of shredded paper or other fibrous material in secluded areas

Mouse hallways (one to two inches deep) on the surface of the insulation

Mouse burrows (one-inch holes going down into the insulation)

Chewed items such as plastic or cardboard boxes or clothing

Identify the entry points. Examine your home to determine how mice get in the attic. Look for gaps and holes on the exterior lower level of your house first. A mouse may enter the attic through:

Openings around water pipes, utilities and dryer vents

Outdoor water taps

Gaps around windows or doors

Cracks or gaps in the foundation

Seal the entry points. Seal all holes and openings that are bigger than one-quarter inch. Use caulk and steel wool scouring pads to plug small holes. Use concrete mortar, sheet metal or heavy-gauge hardware cloth to patch the bigger openings. If you use plastic, wood or other chewable materials the mice will get into the attic again. Be sure windows, doors and screens fit tightly. Use weatherproofing strips around loose-fitting doors to keep the mice out.

Trim trees and bushes near your house. Mice climb the limbs to get to the roof or eaves.

Mouse-proof your food storage areas. Store dried grain and meats in metal canisters, glass jars or other tightly sealed containers.

Hire a wildlife control specialist. If your do-it-yourself efforts to get rid of mice in the attic are unsuccessful, call a wildlife control expert to handle mice removal in the attic and other locations in your house. The Terminix wildlife control experts will look for signs of mice in the attic and determine how the mice get in. They will handle removal of the mice and seal, patch and secure the exterior of your home to get rid of mice for good.

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http://www.mumsnet.com/Talk/housekeeping/1557068-Mouse-in-the-loft-help
http://blog.primrose.co.uk/2017/11/27/how-to-remove-rats-in-the-loft/
http://www.pestdefence.co.uk/news/what-pests-are-in-my-loft/
http://how-to-get-rid-of-mice.com/remove-mice-in-the-attic/
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