How Do I Get Rid Of Mice In My Attic With Blown Insulation

Prepare a bleach water solution or commercial product in a large bucket. Wipe down surfaces that were covered with urine and feces. Spray additional solution across the entire attic floor to sanitize the surface. Use a steady, even amount, but avoid drenching the floor; mist it as if you were using hair spray. Leave the attic to soak and dry.

Related Articles

  • How to Waterproof an Attic
  • How to Control Field Mice
  • How to Detect Perforations in the Air Conditioner Duct
  • How to Remove Pests From Your Attic
  • Scratching Noise at Night in the Attic

Move your inspection to the attic wall corners, underneath the roof overhang, along eaves and vents and anywhere two pieces of wood meet in a joint. With age, wood can deteriorate, swelling with water and shrinking with cold until it results in gaps or rot. Since much of this area is above the insulation level, you can also look from inside the attic. Cover any windows and turn off the light so that any patch of daylight showing indicates a hole.

Mount the roof, if possible, and inspect the condition, especially where eaves join the roof, around trim and surrounding chimneys or vent pipes. Check that chimney flues are capped to prevent rodent entry. Purchase and install a commercial cap, if necessary, according to product instructions. Homemade caps are not legal.

Open up any windows and doors leading to the attic. In the absence of a window, set a fan blowing at low speed into the room to ensure ventilation. While you don’t want to stir up any airborne contaminants, you must get some fresh air in the attic before proceeding. Wait 30 to 60 minutes.

Mix a biocide solution, whether commercial or bleach water at the ratio of 10 parts water to one part household bleach. Enter the attic and, wearing a HEPA filter mask, use a spray bottle or similar to douse the insulation surface and any objects where mouse droppings are present. Wait a few minutes. Not only does water help weigh down microscopic particles that become airborne when disturbed, but the bleach or disinfectant kills germs, viruses and bacteria on contact.

Prepare a bleach water solution or commercial product in a large bucket. Wipe down surfaces that were covered with urine and feces. Spray additional solution across the entire attic floor to sanitize the surface. Use a steady, even amount, but avoid drenching the floor; mist it as if you were using hair spray. Leave the attic to soak and dry.

Reinstall insulation as desired. Now is the perfect time to lay a sheet of polyethylene plastic, plastic sheeting, cut to fit across the joists. This comprises a vapor barrier. Use a commercial blown-in insulation vacuum designed to install the insulation as well, to fill the attic to the recommended height for the R value required. Alternatively, switch insulation, or use a combination such as batt fiberglass insulation topped with blown-in.

2) Find out how mice are getting in
You must identify their entryways and seal them up, they will return. Inspect the exterior of your home. Mouse holes will have a large concentration of greasy residue marks, feces, and some fur around them. Mice are nocturnal (active at night) so you should hear them from dark to dawn.

Removing mice in the insulation of your attic is the same process as mice in any other part of the house. The insulation might seem to make it harder, but it’s not really more difficult. Now, removing a DEAD mouse from blown-in insulation is very hard, because it’s hard to find.

Nobody likes unwanted critters invading their home. Mice invading your attic can cause some serious problems in both rural and more suburban areas. Mice think your attic could be the perfect place to nest and raise a family. It provides a space that is safe from predators, dry, and near to plenty of food and water. As soon as you discover these vermin carrying pests in your home, you take action!

Here are simple steps to help you plan:
1) Make sure you have mice
Examine the exterior of your home for holes or chewed base boards or siding. Greasy smears will surround their entry holes Scat (droppings) the size of a grain of rice will be scattered about in piles. Chattering or squeaking and scratching sounds in walls or attics are common. You might even catch one running across the floor to make a visual identification.

2) Find out how mice are getting in
You must identify their entryways and seal them up, they will return. Inspect the exterior of your home. Mouse holes will have a large concentration of greasy residue marks, feces, and some fur around them. Mice are nocturnal (active at night) so you should hear them from dark to dawn.

3)Decide on your method of eradication
You have confirmed a mouse infestation, and discovered how they are getting in. Now what? Do you want to just make them leave? Do you wish to kill them? What if they have babies? If they are killed, what type will you use and how will you deal with the bodies? If you run them off where do they go and will they return? If you set rap to capture them live, what are you going to do with them?

Look around your house and attic for signs of entry. Mice can fit into very small openings (even holes that appear smaller than their bodies!) Try thinking like a mouse and check your entire attic for spots where they may have entered from. Preventing mice from getting inside your house is a great way to save you time and money in the future by taking a few proactive steps. TIP: If you find any holes bigger than a dime, you’ve most likely got company.

The mice can find their way inside other areas of your house, and can contaminate food sources, and; Even if they only stay in the attic space, their feces can spread disease through the ventilation systems in your home.

Here are 5 simple ways to find out if you have mice taking up residence in your attic:

(5) Noise

(4) Look For Chew Marks & Footprints

You may notice recent gnaw markings, as well as fresh mouse droppings around your house and attic space. Gnaw marks can be found on just about every hard surface, such as your floor, rafters in the ceiling, house siding, electrical wires, ventilation ducts and areas around pipes inside your walls. TIP: If you can’t find any obvious signs of chewing, simply sprinkle talcum powder on your attic floor and inspect for footprints over the following few days.

(3) Look For Signs Of Mice Tunnelling

Inspect your attic for tunnelling, especially if your house has blown in insulation. Mice often tunnel in materials like this and can even get behind fiberglass insulation in order to keep them warm while they are nesting. Mice are fearful so if they can hide their whereabouts they will do so — especially when they hear you coming.

(2) Look For The Source

Look around your house and attic for signs of entry. Mice can fit into very small openings (even holes that appear smaller than their bodies!) Try thinking like a mouse and check your entire attic for spots where they may have entered from. Preventing mice from getting inside your house is a great way to save you time and money in the future by taking a few proactive steps. TIP: If you find any holes bigger than a dime, you’ve most likely got company.

(1) The Obvious Giveaway — Droppings

Mice will leave a trail of faeces while they are scurrying around your house going about their business. Their droppings are very small, oval shaped and pointed at one end. It’s common to find mouse faeces near food sources, but in your attic it’s likely you’ll find them near their nesting spots. The only way to find mouse urine is to use a black light, and it’s horrifying to find out how much mouse urine is all over food prep areas and utensils.

See also:  How Do Mice Get In Attic Uk

So You’ve Got Mice In Your Attic, What Next?

Always keep a clean and tidy household (take the rubbish out often) If you notice a hole in your home’s exterior, seal it up straight away. Regularly inspect your attic to ensure there are no growing pest infestations.

As you climb up to the attic to get your holiday decorations, keep an eye out. No, not for that box you can’t seem to find even though you know you had it last year, but for something even more troubling. Keep an eye out for signs of mice in your attic.

Home // Blog // Tis the Season…for Mice in Your Attic

As you climb up to the attic to get your holiday decorations, keep an eye out. No, not for that box you can’t seem to find even though you know you had it last year, but for something even more troubling. Keep an eye out for signs of mice in your attic.

Short of opening a box of tinsel and seeing a family of mice, you’re going to have to have a keen eye to find mice in the attic. Unlike the normal signs you have a mouse problem, in the attic you could notice slightly different signs.

Most people do not store food in the attic, so finding boxes that are chewed open is unlikely. Unless there is a major infestation, you’re probably not going to find many mouse droppings, unless they’ve settled into that box of wrapping paper. But like we said, if you have a major rodent problem, you may see some droppings.

If you’re up in the attic making a lot of noise yourself, you’re not going to hear mice. They will freeze still when they detect your presence. However, pay attention to any strange sounds you may hear coming from the ceiling or walls bordering your attic. Mice will often sound like a very faint pitter-patter or quiet tapping.

Finally, look for signs of entry. There may be even the smallest hole where mice have gotten into your house. Think like a mouse and look all around your attic for spots they may have gotten in. Even if you don’t have problem with mice, preventing mice from getting into your house is a proactive approach that could save you aggravation and money in the long run by taking a few simple steps.

If you do find signs of mice activity it’s time to make a plan for rodent control. Finding a pest management company (or mouse exterminator in old terminology) that can address your mouse control needs is important. These trained professionals know how to get rid of mice from a home or commercial space quicker and more effectively than you will. If you would like to find out more, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

I am dealing w/mice in the attic. They are active at night, quiet (mostly) during the day. I haven’t been very successful at catching/killing them with the regular spring type traps or the glue boards/boxes. They don’t seem to eat but once per 3 day period. I have captured only 2. The spring traps trip, but don’t always capture the critter. (This has happened twice.) The glue boards don’t interest the mice, except after several days, when two of the boards turned up missing. (No telling where those critters are.)

I am dealing w/mice in the attic. They are active at night, quiet (mostly) during the day. I haven’t been very successful at catching/killing them with the regular spring type traps or the glue boards/boxes. They don’t seem to eat but once per 3 day period. I have captured only 2. The spring traps trip, but don’t always capture the critter. (This has happened twice.) The glue boards don’t interest the mice, except after several days, when two of the boards turned up missing. (No telling where those critters are.)

They have burrowed trails beneath my blown insulation, but I have yet to see anything peeking back at me when I attempt to rustle them out. I have placed one trap or another at all the locations where dropping are present (and that I can get to), but to no avail.

I have two small, five-pound dogs that move in and out at will through a doggy-door, so I cannot use anything that would harm them. I’m a bit of the opinion that these critters, the mice, don’t inhabit our back yard, as the pupsters bring me all kinds of gifts in the form of frogs, birds, snakes, etc. They play with them and occasionally drop them at my feet, so I believe they would do the same with the mice were they to see or hear them in the yard. I have never seen one, and the dogs have not brought me any.

Are there any safe, more efficient, methods that I could use to rid the attic of these pests? I have heard moth balls are a good deterrent. Is that true?

I’m wanting to begin removing the insulation immediately, even before I capture any more of them. Is that a workable idea? Most of the attic area does not have flooring and will require balancing on trusses and 2x4s. Should I spray those areas with disenfectant as I begin each section?

I welcome any feedback. I’m feeling desperate.

Welcome to the forums!

I don’t care much for using poison in the house because the critters can crawl away, die and stink as they decompose IMO traps are the best way to go. We have a pro exterminator on the forums and he should be along later with better advice for you

Why are you wanting to remove the insulation?

Thanks, marksr. I’m new at this, but eager to learn and anxious to resolve this problem.

I want to remove the insulation because the mice have burrowed through and tracked down much of it. That, and the fact that there are droppings up there.

Thanks for your reply marksr. I anxiously await further instruction/information.

Thanks, folks. I’ve re-baited/re-set everything, but I’m still wondering about the moth balls. Anybody know if that might help get rid of them?

Also, I’m ready to start getting rid of the insulation (blown) and am wondering if I should start that process by first spraying each section (as I go) with disinfectant. It’s getting pretty hot up there already, and it’s not going to be a fast cleanup as far as I can tell.

And, of course, I appreciate any feedback.

Moth balls don’t seem to work on rodents. If these rodents are removing the glue boards, then it is something larger than mice. Mice eat frequently; lots of little feedings constantly. Your trap may go off by itself, not unusual, or it could be a larger insect such as a roach, beetle, etc setting it off too.

Thoroughly check and inspect your dog food containers and feeding areas. Dog food, especially outside is a major attractant and source of their food. If dog houses exist outside, then look under them for burrows, harborage, etc.

Rats become trap shy quickly, especially if they set one off and didn’t get caught or as they get caught on the smaller glue traps but get away. They are neo-phobic to begin with, much more so when harassed by non-effective traps.

I’ve known of snakes to get in attics. They too make burrow like holes in insulation.

If rodents are up there, then you should be able to find fecal droppings. Collect some and post photos. Being in Texas you guys have different rodents than we do so this may get to the limit of my experience. If you can find droppings, then also show them to a local agricultural extension office. Correctly identifying the pest is the most important step in solving a pest problem. Keep us posted.

I believe, after checking the roof, that they are getting in around 1 or 2 vent pipes whose flashing is not flush against the roof. (I have no idea how I can get to it from inside the attic, as I can’t even see the pipes from there.) It’s under an oak tree, and I have found numerous acorns in the
insulation, which may be why they aren’t so interested in my bait. Maybe?

See also:  How Keep Mice Out Of Garage

In answer to one of your concerns, my little pupsters are fed inside and clean their bowls thoroughly. (They always act as if they are starving, so they’re not leaving any crumbs to share.)

I will only be able to do the removal in the early morning hours, as it’s already very hot up there. I’m planning to go ahead with the moth balls in the hope that they will run the critters out and away. I guess one of my questions it whether or not that will present a problem with the use of bleach-water to disinfect and reduce air contamination while I scoop up the insulation.

This is a nightmare, and I really appreciate you guys giving me feedback. (I hope my next DIY project is more favorable to the psyche.)

If you are a WordPress user with administrative privileges on this site, please enter your email address in the box below and click «Send». You will then receive an email that helps you regain access.

Block Reason: Access from your area has been temporarily limited for security reasons.
Time: Mon, 7 Dec 2020 9:11:02 GMT

About Wordfence

Wordfence is a security plugin installed on over 3 million WordPress sites. The owner of this site is using Wordfence to manage access to their site.

You can also read the documentation to learn about Wordfence’s blocking tools, or visit wordfence.com to learn more about Wordfence.

Click here to learn more: Documentation

Generated by Wordfence at Mon, 7 Dec 2020 9:11:02 GMT.
Your computer’s time: .

Because of their small size, they’re likely to gain access to your attic by climbing up the wall and squeezing through small spaces.

Squirrels

While squirrels might be cute, they’re one of the most common types of animals you’ll find gnawing through your attic.

They might be similar to mice and rats, but squirrels can be even more damaging.

They’re experts at chewing and can chew through your walls for better access to your house and attic. They can also chew through wood and electrical wires–which could become a fire hazard.

These critters are most active during the daytime. You’re likely to hear them around early morning and evening.

You can use poison, but many prefer to capture and relocate squirrels instead. Either way, be sure to remove the rodents and seal up any access holes.

If the noises in the attic don’t sound like the typical scratching and gnawing, you might be dealing with a different animal altogether.

Bats can be a serious problem to deal with in your attic. They can gain access by squeezing through small holes or flying into your roof through gaps along the roof line.

While they won’t gnaw through anything, they produce large amounts of droppings, which have a pungent odor. Their droppings look like small dark pellets, and they can accumulate quickly.

These droppings are a serious health problem. Not only does it smell bad, but contamination can lead to diseases like histoplasmosis.

Bats are nocturnal creatures. They’re most active during the night, but it can be hard to find them due to the fact that they make very little sound.

While there are items on that market that claim to be able to repel bats, none of these are scientifically proven to work. It’s best to physically remove them yourself or call somebody to help you do it.

In addition, you need to ensure that the droppings are cleaned, the area is sanitized, and all entrance holes are sealed.

1. Do I need to replace all of the attic insulation? I don’t even know where the mice are nesting; to find out would mean I would have to pull out all of the fiberglass insulation sheets from the roof rafters.

Attic Mice and Insulation Issues

Post by General Disarray » Tue May 29, 2018 8:04 am

I live in a large-ish condo association (over 100 units), in a unit attached to three other units. The contractors recently repaired some of the siding and painted the buildings. The siding job destroyed my lawn, unsettling the ground. It was after that when I noticed mice activity.

There clearly are mice in the attic. They likely are using the insulation to nest.

1. Do I need to replace all of the attic insulation? I don’t even know where the mice are nesting; to find out would mean I would have to pull out all of the fiberglass insulation sheets from the roof rafters.

2. At what point do I need to call a mice/pest exterminator? That’s five mice in five days.

Re: Attic Mice and Insulation Issues

Post by livesoft » Tue May 29, 2018 8:10 am

My opinion is that rats and mice are just a natural thing that one will never ever completely get rid of. I assume that every single home and building has mice living in it now or has had mice living in it. There are droppings everywhere and there will always be droppings everywhere until the all the rodent species become extinct which could take a long time.

I would not replace the insulation nor would I vacuum anything and spread the dust.

if you are catching / killing a mouse a day, then you are doing fine as a mouse exterminator. Keep up the good work. But my preference is poison, so I keep rodent poison in my attic for the critters and replenish as needed.

Re: Attic Mice and Insulation Issues

Post by JoeRetire » Tue May 29, 2018 8:18 am

If you are comfortable baiting the traps and disposing of the casualties, you should give it more time. Five days isn’t enough.

Try hard to determine how the mice are getting in and out of the house. For my second home, it took me five years to figure out the (tiny) opening they used and to seal it up! We never had any mice get into the living areas of the house, so it was just a matter of trapping one or two per week in the attic. Now that I sealed their entrance, I haven’t found any recently.

Give it at least one season. If you aren’t able to slow the invasions down to an acceptable level, then call in the professionals. Expect to have them come back every year or so.

Though most insulation has a relatively long life, it is recommended to get the insulation replaced if the efficiency is not suitable, which is anything lower than an R-value of 30. An attic inspector, and most rodent control companies, can evaluate the quality of your insulation and give you the current R-value.

The integrity of a home is quite invaluable because it often is one of the comforts we seek when returning from work or an extended period of travel.

What keeps a home standing strong and snug is often unseen and rarely thought about. It’s known as insulation, and it is the reason a home is kept warm during the winter, and cool all scorching summer long. This magical substance is a miracle and has improved the quality of homes for nearly a hundred years, but it is also a mystery for most.

Rarely does the “average Joe” know the in’s and out’s of attic home insulation, and even more so when to replace it. We usually just know it’s there and that’s enough for the majority. However, it is important to understand insulation in order to keep our cottages as cozy and comfortable as possible.

Here is the basic rundown on how insulation works and when to remove and replace your attic’s home insulation:

Insulation 101: What is Insulation?

According to the Department of Energy, insulation is a substance that provides resistance to heat flow. It’s simply not enough to have a few inches of plywood and stucco to keep a house or building thermostatically sound; it needs a little more help from additional layers.

This is where insulation plays its role: the more heat flow resistance your home has, the lower your heating and cooling will costs and the more consistent your internal temperature will be.

Insulation assists by adding more depth within the house to provide temperature lining without taking up much room or weight within the walls. The way this works is by adding a material that is slow to conducting heat, which means that the temperature around it will not physically affect it. In other words, the insulation creates a barrier that allows the internal cool air to stay separate from the warm external air and visa versa.

See also:  How Are Mice Getting In My Attic

An insulating material’s resistance to conductive heat flow is measured by its thermal resistance, or R-Value. The higher the R-value, the greater the insulating effectiveness, all of which depends on the material used, its thickness, and its density.

Different Insulation Types and Materials:

Such materials that are commonly used as home insulation because of their anti-conductive qualities are:

Fiberglass: Fiberglass is finely spun glass that threads together into a spongy matt. It is available in two forms: Blanket, either in batts or rolls, and loose-filled, which often looks like clumps of cotton that is blown into the desired area. Fiberglass is one of the most common forms of insulation in modern homes because of its high effectiveness, high R-value, and density. However, exposure and direct skin contact can lead to irritation and other risks.

Mineral Coated Wool: Mineral Coated Wool typically refers to two types of materials: Rock Wool or Slang Wool, which are both man-made materials that are byproducts from metal manufacturing. It usually contains on average 75% post-industrial recycled content and doesn’t require additional chemicals to make it fire resistant.

Plastic Fiber: Plastic Fiber is constructed from recycled plastic, typically milk jugs, that are shredded into thread like fibers that resemble closely to fiberglass. Plastic fiber is also highly dense but needs to be treated with a fire retardant so it does not catch fire as easily or melt under intense heat. It typically does not cause skin irritation as fiberglass often does upon exposure.

Natural Fibers: Natural Fibers include cotton, wool, straw, and hemp, which are all resources found and grown in nature. They are typically non-toxic, but can cost up to 20% more than fiberglass and all need to be treated with chemicals to become more resistant to moisture and fire. It also has one of the lowest R-values compared to the other synthetic materials, meaning more substance will need to be used to receive the same amount of coverage, density, and benefits.

When Should You Remove and Replace Insulation?

Regardless of the material used, most substances are still susceptible to weather, meaning it changes shape and effectiveness over time due to fluctuations in temperature, moister, and pests. Therefore, insulation needs to be replaced in order to maintain its integrity and effectiveness.

Though most insulation has a relatively long life, it is recommended to get the insulation replaced if the efficiency is not suitable, which is anything lower than an R-value of 30. An attic inspector, and most rodent control companies, can evaluate the quality of your insulation and give you the current R-value.

Even in homes with old or existing insulation, most refurbishing of insulation typically means adding more to what is already there in order to bring the attic up to an R-30 or R-38 rating. Old insulation may look dusty and be filled with various home debris, but it doesn’t mean it needs to be pre-placed unless its productivity is insufficient. There is also no harm in mixing various insulation material types together either.

It is highly recommended to replace insulation if it has been fire damaged, water damaged, or heavily infested with rodents. Since the insulation acts as a barrier, its job is to keep the internal home atmosphere constant. This means that when water, fire, or rodents damage the insulation, the material is trapping harmful fumes and other hazards within the structure.

Keep in mind, however, that not all the insulation needs replacing. In a typical attic that has seen one of these three damages, only about 5% of the insulation material is disturbed and needs tending to. Many inspectors or pest control agencies can inspect your insulation and spot-check the areas that need to be replaced.

You can also check out this how to on removing attic insulation image by image thanks to /u/crouthamela on Reddit.

Insulation is a miraculous material, and hopefully now its presence is not quite a mystery to us. However, if you are in need of attic insulation inspection or need insulation removal and replacing, contact us at SOS Rodent Control. We go above and beyond simple rodent control by also inspecting and restoring affected areas, which includes home insulation.

If you want to protect your attic insulation from rodents, you will have to keep them out of your home altogether. Doing so requires a combination of making your home a less appealing environment for the pests, and sealing every possible entry point. This may sound simple, but rodents can enter your home through a hole or gap that is 1/4 of an inch in diameter. Now that you have this information, how confident are you that your home is rodent proof or that you won’t experience a rat problem in the future?

Why is Attic Insulation so Prone to Rodent Damage?

Why is there all this fuss about rodents and attic insulation in the first place? Surely, rats and mice have better things to do besides shredding up your home’s insulation. While it may seem like an unnecessary form of destruction, rodents have their reasons for damaging your home’s insulation – and they are not likely to simply stop doing it on their own accord.

Rodent Habitat

Rats and mice that live in the wild make nests out of anything soft and fluffy that they can find. Non- rigid materials like leaves, tree bark, and grasses are all common items that these rodents use to build nests for themselves and their young. The nests help the rodents stay out-of-sight of predators, and they provide the rodents with heat insulation from cold temperatures.

When rodents infest your attic, they have already ‘hit the jackpot’, so to speak. Presumably, your attic is dry and relatively protected from the elements that would otherwise bring in moisture . Still, the rodents will be looking to nest for extra protection and warmth. This is where your precious attic insulation comes in.

Rodents damage insulation in two main ways: They either rip it up into tiny shreds and carry it away to build nests, or they nest directly in the insulation. Both scenarios produce similar results: insulation that is torn and damaged, with an R-value that has been compromised.

If you have such undesired pests using your attic as habitat, the damage to your insulation will only be part of your worries – rodents can cause house fires, induce allergic reactions, and carry deadly diseases. Keeping them out of your attic altogether is the best way to protect yourself and your home’s insulation.

While you can attempt to make this a DIY project, we heavily recommend a professional insulation removal service. Why? Do you know the pros and cons of cellulose insulation, fiberglass insulation, or spray foam insulation? Or have you figured out what tools you’ll need to remove the old attic insulation…and do you have them handy?

Final Thoughts

Attic insulation removal may be necessary because of rodent damage, the presence of old insulation, or water and mold damage. Rodent infestation is a common precursor to insulation removal because rodents find an ideal habitat in an attic. Insulation can be used as nesting material, and attics themselves are sheltered from the elements and other predators.

While you can attempt to make this a DIY project, we heavily recommend a professional insulation removal service. Why? Do you know the pros and cons of cellulose insulation, fiberglass insulation, or spray foam insulation? Or have you figured out what tools you’ll need to remove the old attic insulation…and do you have them handy?

If you aren’t sure whether you need to have the insulation in your attic removed, consider scheduling a free estimate. Even if you don’t have a rodent infestation, replacing outdated insulation with new insulation can substantially reduce your energy costs and result in more stable temperatures throughout your home.

Live in OC or SD? We are proud to provide attic insulation removal in Orange County and San Diego! To schedule a free estimate, please contact Attic Construction today.

Source
http://homeguides.sfgate.com/mice-out-attics-blown-insulation-30870.html
http://ridmiceinattic.com/insulation.html
http://ridofmice.net/blog/mice-in-the-attic/
http://tomlinsonbomberger.com/blog/tis-the-season-for-mice-in-your-attic/
http://www.doityourself.com/forum/indoor-outdoor-insect-pest-control/490460-mice-attic.html
http://upgradedhome.com/how-to-get-rid-of-mice-in-attic-with-blown-insulation/
http://www.atticsolutionsusa.com/noises-in-the-attic-the-most-common-attic-pests-and-how-to-get-rid-of-them/
http://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=250463
http://sosrodentcontrol.com/resources/attic-care/a-guide-to-removing-old-attic-insulation/
http://atticconstruction.com/blog/does-rodent-resistant-insulation-exist/
http://atticconstruction.com/blog/the-importance-of-attic-insulation-removal/
Share:
No comments

Добавить комментарий

Your e-mail will not be published. All fields are required.

×
Recommend
Adblock
detector