Where Do Termites Live? Termite Habitat Facts

Where Do Termites Come From?

Termite Habitats and Why They Enter Homes

There are three major types of termites, drywood, dampwood, and subterranean, and the respective species all thrive in different habitats. These environments fulfill their specific food and shelter needs. Unfortunately, termites frequently find sustainable nest sites inside homes.

Certain factors increase the possibility for in-house termite infestations, including high levels of moisture, the availability of wood, and protection from the elements and avoidance of predators. Homeowners should look out for favorable conditions and signs of activity, as termites can cause extremely costly structural damage. By knowing where to look in the home, individuals are able to avoid costly repairs.

Drywood Termite Habitats

Drywood termites are able to live in any dry wood habitats. This allows them to find shelter in buildings such as homes. The pests can travel into houses on furniture and dry firewood. They also live in trees that are near cracks and voids in home exteriors. As these termites live deep inside wooden structures, home invasions are often hard to spot.

Dampwood Termite Habitats

In contrast, dampwood termites seek out moisture-damaged wood and damp soil in which to nest. Leaking gutters and faucets and humidity in kitchens and basements draw the pests inside. When termites are offered ground-level openings into homes, the pests use these to travel inside.

Subterranean Termite Habitats

Subterranean termites also require damp soil to support their colonies. In fact, Formosan colonies, a subspecies, use mud to create tunnels that lead from their nests to food sources. Subterranean termites are commonly found in yards and houses where soil, moisture, and wood are plentiful. They especially prefer old tree stumps and fallen branches.

Finding Termites in Homes

If homeowners find signs of drywood, dampwood, or subterranean termite damage, they should immediately contact pest control specialists. The experts at Orkin do their best to prevent structural issues and large infestations by assessing the damage already done and coming up with the best plan for limit any further termite problems.

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How Termites Get in Your Home

Understanding how termites get in your house — and why they want to come inside — is crucial to preventing an infestation. After your termite inspection, your pest control expert should explain any signs of activity and potential entry points. He or she also should provide prevention and control tips specific to your home’s construction type, termite species active in the area, and structural and moisture conditions conducive to infestations.

What Termites Need

Termites need food (cellulose such as wood), moisture and warmth to survive.

Wood building materials in and around homes — from the basement to the crawl space to the attic — can provide the ideal food source for these wood-destroying insects.

Common construction conditions around homes, including areas of insufficient grading that allow puddles to form near the foundation and air conditioning units that create run-off moisture, can offer sufficient moisture for termite colonies.

Through regular inspections, a termite specialist can help identify common hot spots for activity and warning signs for a termite infestation, plus share tips to help keep termites at bay. Termites can fit through cracks as thin as an average business card (1/32 inch) so proper maintenance is crucial to seal up any gaps around the foundation and roof/eaves.

Subterranean Termite Entry Points

Subterranean termite colonies live underground. They typically enter homes at ground level or below, but they can build mud tubes to enter spots several feet above ground level.

One of the most common ways termites get in your home is through wood-to-ground contact, including doorframes, deck posts, and porch steps or supports. Subterranean termites also enter homes through cracks in the foundation and cracks in brick mortar. Sometimes, they even use the holes in concrete blocks to travel through foundation walls.

Subterranean termite prevention focuses on addressing trouble spots, such as water that pools around the foundation, and monitoring for signs of activity. Your pest control expert also may recommend monitoring stations, liquid soil treatments or direct wood treatment.

Drywood Termite Entry Points
Drywood termite infestations typically begin when swarmers (alates) locate a crevice in the wood of your home, dig out a little nest and seal themselves inside. Then, they begin producing eggs to build their colony. Within a couple of years, this colony can grow to a size capable of causing serious wood damage in your home.

It can be difficult to prevent drywood termite infestations because this species can enter the home on any floor (not just near the foundation or soil like subterranean termites). Regular maintenance to keep the exterior wood of your home in good condition, combined with proactive treatment measures recommended by a trained expert, can help reduce the likelihood and scope of an infestation.

Formosan termite nest under a floor:

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Where Do Termites Come From?

Some of the most destructive insects to have in a neighbor of homes where there is lots of rotted wood and trees are termites. Termites build large colonies under dry grounds that tunnel for miles and miles. For this reason is makes termites extremely difficult to get rid from a particular area. It is always wise to choose a home in a neighborhood where termite damage has not occurred. Doing so will save your family as well as yourself the hassle of trying to rid termites from your home, this can sometimes be impossible to do even with exterminators.

What Exactly Are Termites?

Termites are small insects similar to ants where they live in colonies and have self-organized systems that include workers, soldiers, and reproductive individuals of both sexes and queens. The only difference is termites are detritivores, which means they strictly eat dead plants and trees or other woody materials. Termites are approximately a few millimeters in length with white clear bodies.

Some of the different termites that love infecting old dead wood are damp wood termites, dry wood termites, Formosan termites, subterranean termites and cone head termites. All types have long skinny bodies, six legs, two antennas, elongated heads and pinchers for chewing. Some termites depending on the sex and job they must do will have wings to help them fly around in the springtime finding new places to build new colonies and eat old dead trees. These insects even love warm a bright area where there is lots of dead wood is also a huge attraction for termite to begin infestations.

Where Do Termites Come From?

You may believe that termites come from old rotted wood, but this is simply what they dine on when they are hungry. Subterranean termites come from the ground where they live in build massive colonies and take care of the queen termites.

These colonies typically love building in areas where there are large timber trees and dead stumps that are rotting away. Termites carry themselves from place to place by flying on windy days where they can travel about fifty feet at a time. During their travels they will land, stop, and build new colonies where they feel best, which could be under your home or business or even in your buildings structure such as old rotted windows, doors, beams, and windowpanes.

How Can You Prevent a Home or Business from Termite Damage?

To avoid termite damage, you must prevent termite infestation. You can prevent termite infestations by keeping the soil and grounds around your home from remaining continuously moist and by treating it often with a liquid insecticide. Installing termite baiting systems can also help keep termites away and from creating a huge issue within homes and business structures.

Replacing old rotted wood, panels and beams before an infestation occurs can also help prevent damage to your home or business from termite chewing and eating. Early detection of an initial termite infestation is your best action against getting rid of them with a professional termination team educated in termite exterminating termites from your properly.

What are the Ways Termites are Exterminated From a Property?

If you suspect you have a termite infestation one of the questions you should be answering is, “where do termites come from?” Knowing where the insects are coming from can help you locate the termite «nest» and kill the pests properly with insecticides, which may require several treatments of insecticide in order to rid them completely. If the infestation has invaded your homes structure you are going to need to access more than where do termites come from, but how large is the termite nest and infestation.

Other questions you will should ask is, “did the termites chew through all the boards of my business or home’s structure? Or are only certain parts of my business or home damaged?” If the termites got to most of the wooden structure of your home or business, you might need to tear your home or business down and rebuild.

This is because termite damage can be so severe it causes structures to collapse, or makes it difficult to completely rid them from the area you wish to rid them from without removing all the chewed old wood. Sometimes it is best just to leave the termite-infested area, and build elsewhere since the insects are relentless and have such a massive infestation in that particular area that is impossible to get rid of with pesticides and other methods alone.

Now You Know Where do Termites Come From

If you ever experience termites in or around your home, it is time to call a termite exterminating expert to help you determine how bad the infestation is and what you can do to treat it. If you can, always have a home or business inspection done before purchasing a building, so you do not end up with a termite infestation that costs you endless amounts of money before everything is remedied. In fact, in many places getting a termite inspection done on a property is required by law before the purchase of the home. Sometimes trying to answer the questions of, “where do termites come from?” can be difficult since subterranean termites can live anywhere underneath the ground where they are difficult to detect. Add to that the fact that drywood termites reach a stage of life where they sprout wings and fly in search of good real estate for establishing a new colony and it become apparent that these little critters are tough to deal with on your own.

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Termite Control

Western® helps prevent your home from becoming their dinner.

Our Services

Liquid Termite Barrier

With Liquid Termite Barrier, you’ll receive 100% control in less than 120 days. We’ll apply a liquid treatment barrier around your home, which termites will ingest, killing them in the process. Our Termi-Teller™ Monitors are installed and inspected to ensure the «treated zone» is working properly. We’ll also provide a thorough interior inspection to give you added peace of mind.

Baiting System

With eco-friendly Sentricon® bait stations placed strategically around your home’s perimeter, termite colonies will decline as they feed. Foraging individuals will feed on bait, bringing the active materials back to the colony to eliminate all individuals. Once the existing termite colony is removed, Western Termite Technicians will continue monitoring the stations on a regular basis to help prevent further colonies from forming.

Bait Protection with Targeted Treatment

For homes that already show some signs of termites or termite damage, we will apply a targeted treatment using a quick-acting product where termites are seen to take care of those already causing damage. Sentricon® bait stations will then be placed strategically around the home’s perimeter to eliminate the surrounding colonies to offer long-term, full protection.

Why Western?

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

If you’re not satisfied with our termite treatment, we’ll re-treat your home as required with no further charges. We stand behind our ability to help eliminate pests, and we won’t stop until we’ve completed the job for you.

Call the Professionals.

«Steve from western has helped me out several times with termite inspections. He has been very professional, thorough in his inspections. I highly recommend their services for termite inspections.»

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Can Termites Move From House To House?

You are in the car, listening to your favorite radio station. Today was your “running errands” day. You went to the bank to take care a financial situation, had coffee with a friend, and went to the grocery store. As you turn into your neighborhood, you notice a termite pest control vehicle parked right next to your house. You pull into your driveway and start unloading groceries from your trunk. As you are on your last trip, your neighbor walks out and explains you her situation. Apparently she has a termite infestation in her home. The Cave Creek termite exterminator found the termite colony in the basement and determined it’s been about six months since the colony settled. Your neighbor is getting a termite treatment in Cave Creek that will eliminate the termites and spraying pesticide to protect her home from future termites and other pest.

You wish her luck and as you close the door of your house, you are wondering if your house has termites. Your neighbor’s house is only a few feet away, what if the termites move into your house? After getting paranoid and researching for possible signs of termites, you call a termite pest control in Cave Creek and ask for termite inspection in Cave Creek as soon as possible. Varsity Termite and Pest Control can tell that it’s very unlikely for termites to move from house to house. Houses that were built simultaneously and in the same neighborhood get termite infestation at the same time. If one house in your neighbor as termites, is probable that your house also has termites. Before you panic, the degree termite infestation is different for every house. To limited the possibility of termites inhabiting in your home, we suggest the following:

  • Remove dead wood from your property.
  • Keep firewood, lumber, paper away from foundation or crawl space.
  • Check decks and wooden fences for damage.
  • Remove excessive plant cover and wood mulch.
  • Wood on your home shouldn’t contact the soil.
  • Place screen on outside vents.
  • Repair leaking faucets, water pipes, and A/C units.
  • Divert water from foundation.
  • Keep gutter and downspouts clean.
  • Get rid of standing water on roof.
  • Keep all vents clear and open.
  • Seal entry points around water and utility lines or pipes.

Half of the list are about decreasing the food source and the other half is making sure your house is not habitable for termites. The main food source of termites is cellulose. Cellulose is an organic compound that is found in plants’ biology. Cellulose is found in wood, and wood is the common food of termites. Reducing the amount of wood/cellulose related materials will decrease the possibility of termites in your property. Suggestions from 1-5 gives you an idea of what to look for. Adding to that, most people store their personal belongings in cardboard boxes or/and plastic containers. Both material attracts termites, however we recommend to use the plastic containers and maintaining them as clean as possible.

While plastic attracts termites, where you store the containers is important. Warm and humid environments attract termites. Basements are usually humid and warm, which is why the neighbor’s termite infestation was mainly in the basement. Suggestions from the list above, 6-12, is about eliminating moisture from your house. A termite will die if it’s exposed to dry temperature. Arizona is 90% desert, so why are termites in major cities? Well, termites go for moisture environment, and in there are environments with enough moisture for termites to inhabit. Repairing leaks, diverting water from your house foundation, keeping the gutter and downspouts clean, and sealing entry point around water and utility lines will disqualify your house a possibility of a home for termites

In other words, keep your property and house clean and well maintained. That will not only reduce the possibility of termites in your home, but as well as other pest. The suggestions above are not 100% guaranteed that termites will never step a leg in your home, other variables are considered. Talk with your neighbor. Ask them how they spot the signs of termite? What kind of termites they had and for how long, and what their termite treatment is and for how long as well. After that, call a termite pest control company. Varsity Termite and Pest Control will answer all your questions and concerns. We can also arrange for termite exterminator conducted a free termite inspection in your home. And if you are paranoid that termite might move to your house, we can decide on a termite treatment to eliminate that possibility.

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What Attracts Termites to a Home?

Termites can put holes not just in your property, but in your wallet, too. These pests can cause extensive damage to your home, and repairs are often expensive.

Some people mistakenly believe that cold winter temperatures hinder termite activity. In reality, winter, or cold weather, has nothing to do with termites entering homes. Let’s discuss some conditions that might attract termites to your home, as well as the signs of termite infestation and measures you can take to make your home less prone to termites.

Wood and cellulose material: Termites feed on lumber, firewood, newspapers and other cellulose materials. Do not store such materials near places that are easily accessible to termites, such as the foundation. Get rid of any decayed lumber or firewood, which termites prefer over sound wood.

Warm, dark places: Termites prefer moist, undisturbed places such as crawl spaces. Reduce moisture in your home’s crawl spaces by having your home inspected and evaluated for moisture sources and solutions.

Moist soil: Termites are attracted to moisture and there is usually plenty of moisture in the soil upon which your foundation is built. Keep the soil next to your home’s foundation as dry as possible by repairing any leaking faucets or pipes. Divert excess water from your foundation with properly functioning gutters, downspouts and splash blocks. Use lawn sprinklers and irrigation systems in a way that minimizes water accumulation near your foundation.

Signs of termite infestation

Tree stumps, stored lumber or firewood, cardboard boxes, untreated fence posts and buried scrap wood are all susceptible to a termite infestation. Inspect your home’s porches and other structural or foundation wood for signs of termites. The most common signs of infestation include:

  1. Wood damage found below and behind surfaces like walls and floors. This includes cracks in the veneer or maze-like tunneling in wood. Also, look for small holes in drywall or plaster walls that suggest termite activity.
  2. Discarded wings found near closed windows, doors and other entry points.
  3. Pencil-sized mud tubes found wherever the ground meets your home or near any other possible food sources, like trees or sheds.

How to help prevent a termite infestation

While houses do not attract termites actively, when termites find them they are quick to come in. You’ll need to take measures to help keep an infestation from happening in your home. Usually, termite infestations are only spotted after they’ve become severe. Measures you can take to help prevent an infestation include replacing damaged wood and taking proper steps to correct the termite-attracting conditions listed above.

A more permanent solution to preventing termites involves the use of pesticides, which should be handled by a licensed pest control professional. If you suspect a termite invasion or are looking for ways to prevent one, schedule an inspection with a Terminix ® professional today.

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ARE TICKS DANGEROUS?

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