What To Do If A Tick s Head Gets Stuck When You re Trying To Remove It, Because It Happens All The Time

What To Do If A Tick’s Head Gets Stuck When You’re Trying To Remove It, Because It Happens All The Time

If you’re the type of person who lives for the summer, you might spend the rest of the year in a state of denial about the not-so-great stuff that comes with the warmer months, such as. ticks. Unfortunately, ticks and Lyme Disease are as much a part of the summertime experience as lemonade and sprinklers (in a very different way). And no matter what you do, prevention-wise, some tenacious ticks always seem to get through. That means a removal is in order, but it’s not always easy. What should you do if the tick’s head gets stuck?

«Of course, it would be great to avoid this issue from the beginning by using the correct technique to remove a tick, which involves using a set of tweezers carefully positioned between the skin and the tick’s mouth,» Jo Ellis, Director of Education and Outreach with the Bay Area Lyme Foundation, tells Romper.

Unfortunately, as someone who was diagnosed with Lyme Disease twice, I know how tricky it can be to get the little buggers out. Some ticks are tiny and impossible to see. Other ticks (if they’ve been hanging out for awhile at the blood buffet) are big and bloated and exasperatingly easy to accidentally pop. And still others just refuse to come out in one piece. Then what are you supposed to do?

«If the tick is incorrectly removed and the tick’s ‘head’ gets stuck in your child’s skin, don’t panic,» says Ellis.

«Find a pair of pointy-tipped tweezers, and gently dislodge the tick’s mouthparts. Be sure to thoroughly wash the area with rubbing alcohol before and with soap and water after pulling the head out. If you find that you are unable to remove the head and mouthparts yourself, we recommend taking your child to the doctor’s office to have the remainder of the tick removed by a healthcare professional. Be sure to monitor the bite site and your child’s health after removal for any symptoms, changes in behavior, and/or the appearance of a rash.» It’s also important to note that not everyone gets the trademark rash, Ellis adds (I didn’t).

To prevent this tick’s head from separating during the removal process in the first place, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention gives the following instructions on its website for proper and safe tick removal:

  1. Use fine-tipped tweezers to grip the tick as close to the surface of the skin as possible.
  2. Pull upward using steady, even pressure, but be sure not to twist or jerk the tick, which can «cause the mouth-parts to break off and remain in the skin» (ewwww). If that does happen, you should «remove the mouth-parts with tweezers» (again, ewwww). If they can’t be easily removed, «leave it alone» and allow the skin to heal.
  3. After you remove the tick, clean the bite area well with rubbing alcohol or soap and water and wash your own hands, too.
  4. Don’t crush a tick with your fingers; instead, get rid of a live tick by putting it in alcohol, placing it in a bag or container that’s tightly sealed, wrapping it up with tape, or flushing it down the toilet.

And no matter what hacks you’ve heard about, the CDC also warns against such methods as «‘painting’ the tick with nail polish or petroleum jelly, or using heat to make the tick detach from the skin,» as your goal is to get the tick out as quickly as possible instead of waiting for it to leave on its own time. Anyway, let’s assume that something goes horribly awry at some point in the removal and the tick’s head and/or «mouth-parts» don’t come out with the rest of it. If that does happen, according to the CDC, you should «remove the mouth-parts with tweezers» (again, ewwww). If they can’t be easily removed, «leave it alone» and allow the skin to heal.

I know, I know. leave it alone?! Really? Just. let the skin heal up with tick mouth-parts in there? Apparently, yes. The Seattle Children’s Hospital website concurs, adding that after removing any «large» pieces of the head and cleaning the skin, you can use a clean needle to scrape off smaller pieces; still, if some remain, the skin will «slowly heal and shed it» (so at least it won’t be in there forever). If, however, a large piece of the head remains, the hospital recommends calling your child’s doctor. You should also follow up with a professional if a fever or rash develops in the next four weeks, the bite starts to look infected, or your child shows any other new or strange symptoms (fatigue, pain, mood changes, etc.).

And, remember, prevention is key (even if it’s not foolproof).

Jo Ellis, Director of Education and Outreach with the Bay Area Lyme Foundation

This article was originally published on June 20, 2018

www.romper.com

What happens if a tick’s head remains in the dog?

my dog had a tick on his chest, and i removed it the «proper» way, but its head was still in his chest.

he’s up to date on all his shots, including lyme disease.

is it really a reason to worry about it?

12 Answers

Well the outcome will depend. If that tick was carrying a disease or bacteria then the dog will become infected.

Most ticks don’t carry such disease and your dog will most likely be fine. I suggest looking up problems that can arise from ticks heads being left in, this way you will be prepared should it happen.

Now i’m not sure what you mean by «proper way» of removing a tick..but for the future, in my vet class we were told the best and most effective way to remove a tick is to first put rubbing alcohol over the tick, this will kill it, ticks feed off the blood of a dog and so they will grab onto the dog with their teeth the alcohol will get the tick to release its grip on your dog making it easier to remove it. Then after putting the alcohol on take tweezers and go as close to the head as possible and twist and pull it out.

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That tick wasn’t dead. There is a simple trick to removing a tick. I like to use a pair of tweezers or forceps to hold onto the tick (don’t squeeze it tho’), then apply light upward pressure until the tick lets go. If you pull to hard the tick will hold on and then you will brake the head off. Of the several hundred verities of ticks, only a few present a problem. As long as the tick is ingesting blood it doesn’t present any kind of health risk. It is when it releases saliva back into the animal that it does, and this happens when you brake the head off, burn it with a match to make it release, or other things of like nature. So it is very important to pull the tick off with light pressure allowing it to release it’s hold.

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Any vet will tell you that your dog will be fine as long as the body was removed regardless of what kind of shots the dog has. After removing the tick just put a little neosporin on it and your dog will be fine. For all you want to be vets on here posting nonsense do me a favor and call your vet and see what they say, I’m 100% positive that they will reiterate what I just posted. Another thing is whoever told you to apply rubbing alcohol is incorrect, if you are going to use anything it should be hydrogen peroxide

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My dog will not be restrained for any slow twisting and pulling. my fiance used to do the tick removing, but he recently passed away so my dog is stuck with me. I am pretty sure I did not get the head out so I cleaned it with hydrogen peroxide, put neosporin on it, and have been applying warm compresses to draw out any infection that may try to start. I’ll keep an eye on it and hope for the best.

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If you removed it the «proper» way it’s head wouldn’t still be buried in your dogs chest.

From pet education.com

Vaccination: There are several whole-cell killed vaccines on the market that are licensed for use in the dog, including Lymevax by Fort Dodge and Lyme Galaxy by Schering-Plough. Recombinant vaccines, such as Recombitek Lyme by Merial and ProLyme by Intervet are also available, and tend to produce fewer vaccine reactions. However, total protection of a dog through any vaccine is difficult. One reason is that there are various strains of Borrelia and antibodies made in response to one strain of the bacteria will not always be able to kill a different strain. In addition, if an animal is previously infected with the disease the vaccine will not offer any protection. These facts coupled with the relatively long incubation period (up to 5 months) contribute to the failure of some of these vaccines in preventing disease.

Some veterinarians have criticized the ineffectiveness of the Lyme vaccines and do not recommend their use. Although many dogs have been vaccinated and treated for Lyme disease, some vaccinated animals contract the disease, but it appears that vaccinated animals are less likely to contract the disease than unvaccinated animals. Vaccinations can be started after 12 weeks of age and it is recommended that two doses be given three weeks apart, then boostered yearly after that. Because of the inherent problems of over-vaccination, it is recommended that only dogs that are exposed to ticks in areas where Lyme disease is a problem be vaccinated.

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Removing a tick the ‘proper’ way includes removing the head, follow what was said above, alcohol, tweezers and a slow turn and pull.

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Keep an eye on the area. The heads have been known to continue going deeper into the animal. If you see an infection starting, Get him to the vet.

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I’m pretty sure I read something about how as long as you get the ticks BODY removed, it’s okay. Because the poisons are in the body not the head. Just watch the area, and if things start changing take him/her to the vet

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It can get infected but I would just put some antibiotic cream on the spot for now and watch it! Trying to dig it out will cause more harm than good and open up the spot for infection to just get in it easier.

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It could get infected. Keep an eye on it, or call the vet and ask them what to do-leave it alone or try to dig it out.

answers.yahoo.com

what to do if the ticks head is still in my dogs skin?

12 Answers

Had the same problem just 2 weeks ago. I asked my vet since I had an appointment there the next day anyway. He didn’t cut it out. Just told me to wait for it to come out by itself. And it did after a week or so.

I’d still monitor it, to make sure it doesn’t turn into a nasty (big!) infection. A -small- infection is normal.

Cleanse the area 1 or 2 times a day with alcohol and dab an antibiotic ointment on it after. This will prevent a major infection as your dogs body eliminates the head of it’s own accord. Symptoms to contact your vet for: fever, lameness, swollen joints or lymph nodes, lethargy and appetite loss

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  • You should always try to remove any tick on your dog straight away — especially the ticks head. If you don’t remove the head an abscess may form on the skin. The best way of removing a tick from your dog is by ‘jerking it’ away (using tweezers if possible) but sometimes as you have found,the head may remain. In this case, use some alcohol i.e. gin or meths and dab it on the head, wait for about 2/3 minutes — then the tick will die and you can remove it safely with tweezers.

    Alternatively, give it a good dose of flea spray and then brush it off your dog the following day.

    Some people leave the tick sucking the blood from your dog, till it gets bloated, and then pull it off. I don’t advise this at all and prefer to remove it immediately.

    My German Shepherd Dog got a tick just above her eye today after her walk through the fields, I noticed it as I was putting her back into the car — I removed it immediately without using tweezers.

    You have to check — especially underneath your dog.

    answers.yahoo.com

    What happens if a tick’s head remains in the dog?

    my dog had a tick on his chest, and i removed it the «proper» way, but its head was still in his chest.

    he’s up to date on all his shots, including lyme disease.

    is it really a reason to worry about it?

    12 Answers

    Well the outcome will depend. If that tick was carrying a disease or bacteria then the dog will become infected.

    Most ticks don’t carry such disease and your dog will most likely be fine. I suggest looking up problems that can arise from ticks heads being left in, this way you will be prepared should it happen.

    Now i’m not sure what you mean by «proper way» of removing a tick..but for the future, in my vet class we were told the best and most effective way to remove a tick is to first put rubbing alcohol over the tick, this will kill it, ticks feed off the blood of a dog and so they will grab onto the dog with their teeth the alcohol will get the tick to release its grip on your dog making it easier to remove it. Then after putting the alcohol on take tweezers and go as close to the head as possible and twist and pull it out.

    • Log in to reply to the answers Post

    That tick wasn’t dead. There is a simple trick to removing a tick. I like to use a pair of tweezers or forceps to hold onto the tick (don’t squeeze it tho’), then apply light upward pressure until the tick lets go. If you pull to hard the tick will hold on and then you will brake the head off. Of the several hundred verities of ticks, only a few present a problem. As long as the tick is ingesting blood it doesn’t present any kind of health risk. It is when it releases saliva back into the animal that it does, and this happens when you brake the head off, burn it with a match to make it release, or other things of like nature. So it is very important to pull the tick off with light pressure allowing it to release it’s hold.

    • Log in to reply to the answers Post

    Any vet will tell you that your dog will be fine as long as the body was removed regardless of what kind of shots the dog has. After removing the tick just put a little neosporin on it and your dog will be fine. For all you want to be vets on here posting nonsense do me a favor and call your vet and see what they say, I’m 100% positive that they will reiterate what I just posted. Another thing is whoever told you to apply rubbing alcohol is incorrect, if you are going to use anything it should be hydrogen peroxide

    • Log in to reply to the answers Post

    My dog will not be restrained for any slow twisting and pulling. my fiance used to do the tick removing, but he recently passed away so my dog is stuck with me. I am pretty sure I did not get the head out so I cleaned it with hydrogen peroxide, put neosporin on it, and have been applying warm compresses to draw out any infection that may try to start. I’ll keep an eye on it and hope for the best.

    • Log in to reply to the answers Post

    If you removed it the «proper» way it’s head wouldn’t still be buried in your dogs chest.

    From pet education.com

    Vaccination: There are several whole-cell killed vaccines on the market that are licensed for use in the dog, including Lymevax by Fort Dodge and Lyme Galaxy by Schering-Plough. Recombinant vaccines, such as Recombitek Lyme by Merial and ProLyme by Intervet are also available, and tend to produce fewer vaccine reactions. However, total protection of a dog through any vaccine is difficult. One reason is that there are various strains of Borrelia and antibodies made in response to one strain of the bacteria will not always be able to kill a different strain. In addition, if an animal is previously infected with the disease the vaccine will not offer any protection. These facts coupled with the relatively long incubation period (up to 5 months) contribute to the failure of some of these vaccines in preventing disease.

    Some veterinarians have criticized the ineffectiveness of the Lyme vaccines and do not recommend their use. Although many dogs have been vaccinated and treated for Lyme disease, some vaccinated animals contract the disease, but it appears that vaccinated animals are less likely to contract the disease than unvaccinated animals. Vaccinations can be started after 12 weeks of age and it is recommended that two doses be given three weeks apart, then boostered yearly after that. Because of the inherent problems of over-vaccination, it is recommended that only dogs that are exposed to ticks in areas where Lyme disease is a problem be vaccinated.

    • Log in to reply to the answers Post

    Removing a tick the ‘proper’ way includes removing the head, follow what was said above, alcohol, tweezers and a slow turn and pull.

    • Log in to reply to the answers Post

    Keep an eye on the area. The heads have been known to continue going deeper into the animal. If you see an infection starting, Get him to the vet.

    • Log in to reply to the answers Post

    I’m pretty sure I read something about how as long as you get the ticks BODY removed, it’s okay. Because the poisons are in the body not the head. Just watch the area, and if things start changing take him/her to the vet

    • Log in to reply to the answers Post

    It can get infected but I would just put some antibiotic cream on the spot for now and watch it! Trying to dig it out will cause more harm than good and open up the spot for infection to just get in it easier.

    • Log in to reply to the answers Post

    It could get infected. Keep an eye on it, or call the vet and ask them what to do-leave it alone or try to dig it out.

    au.answers.yahoo.com

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