What Is Coal Tar Soap, Our Everyday Life

What Is Coal Tar Soap?

Coal tar is derived from coal. It is the black, liquid byproduct from the distillation process. This black liquid has antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties that are used to treat a variety of skin conditions. It can be formulated into shampoos, lotions, creams, soaps and ointments. While relatively safe, there are some side effects to note. In addition, there have been concerns that coal tar soap may cause cancer.

Properties

According to both the Mayo Clinic as well as «The Truth About Coal Tar,» coal tar soap has moisturizing, anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and anti-parasitic properties. Coal tar is extremely thick and viscous. It has a strong, unpleasant smell. Soaps made from coal tar are black and also have the characteristic smell. According to Eczema.net, it can also stain a variety of materials.

Skin Disease Treatment

According to the Mayo Clinic, dermatologists prescribe coal tar soap to help treat or prevent a variety of skin diseases including psoriasis, eczema, acne, seborrhea dermatitis, scabies and ringworm. The anti-inflammatory properties help relieve the inflammation and itchiness associated with these diseases, and coal tar soap can help slow down rapid skin cell growth seen in seborrheic dermatitis, according to the American Family Physician. Sometimes, coal tar is used after other medications. For example, adherent scale on seborrhea dermatitis may require softening first with oils and then removal by coal tar shampoo. According to the Economic Expert, coal tar soap can also kill and repel head lice.

Carcinogenic Concerns

Controversy exists as to whether the coal tar in coal tar soap can cause cancer. According to DermNetNZ, animals studies have shown increases in skin cancer upon exposure to coal tar, but human studies showed no increased incidence. In addition, the Federal Drug Administration indicates there is no scientific evidence that the low concentrations of coal tar in coal tar soap have carcinogenic properties.

Side Effects

Coal tar soaps do have some side effects, particularly for people with sensitive skin. While often used to treat irritated skin, coal tar soap can actually cause redness and irritation in certain individuals.

The use of coal tar soap can increase an individual’s sensitivity to the sun, increasing the risk of sunburn. Caution should be used to avoid sunlight and the use of sunlamps when using coal tar soap. Although coal tar soap washes off easily, and does not leave a residue, according to the Mayo Clinic, the ingredients in coal tar soap remain active within the skin for at least 24 to 72 hours.

Use of Coal Tar Soap

Although coal tar soap is used to treat skin conditions, it should not be used on infected, blistered, raw or oozing areas. When applying the soap directly to the skin, apply enough to wash the affected area well, rub gently, then rinse. Usually, adults will wash the affected area one or two times a day. The soap is usually stored at room temperature, away from heat and direct light. According to the Mayo Clinic, it is important to note that true coal tar-containing soaps contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and in most areas, require a prescription.

oureverydaylife.com

Pine Tar Soap Benefits – Not Just for Baseball, we Hit the Sticky Secrets Behind Pine Tar

Pine tar is a substance that has been used for centuries. It has a variety of uses but is primarily used as an ingredient in soap. You may have seen it and wondered what pine tar soap is, and why it’s used.

Pine soap is used in soothing treatment for skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis; it is said to relieve itching caused by bug bites. This property alone makes it a great addition to your medicine cabinet during the warm months when mosquitoes are found virtually everywhere.

History of Pine Tar and its Soap

Pine tar soap has a long history. Its main ingredient, pine tar is used in a variety of applications.

  • Pine tar is a sticky substance that results from burning the wood of pine trees.
  • The use of pine tar originates in Scandinavia. It is used a preservative to protect wood from the harsh winter conditions as well as on the bottoms of Nordic skis.
  • Pine tar became an important export from the American colonies as many areas were covered in pine forests back in the day. Ropes and rigging on ships were sealed with pine tar to prevent rotting from the harsh conditions and exposure to sea water. British sailors were nicknamed “tar” for this reason. Pine tar is used on the handles of baseball bats because the stickiness of the substance lends batter griping.

  • Pine tar is used in veterinary medicine to treat a variety of conditions for cattle and chickens. It is used in medicinal applications as a treatment for various skin conditions as well. Pine tar has a wide variety of applications— from maritime uses, medicinal uses, to the production of soaps–and was quite the money-maker in the post-independence periods of the United States.

Pine Tar Soap: The Benefits of Use

Pine tar soap is a natural soap which has long been touted for its medicinal benefits in the treatment of skin conditions, plus treatment of dandruff.

See also:  Head Lice Fact Sheet, NitWits 10 top facts about Nits and Lice

Pine tar, as well as pine oil, has a strong pine smell; it is combined with other scented oils as well as essential oils for use on the body. It is said to have antibacterial and anti-fungal qualities and is useful to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy, oak, and sumac. Pine soap, is also used to treat skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis; it relieves the itching caused by bug bites.

Pine tar is a common additive in shampoo and is used to treat the inflammation and itching of the scalp due to dandruff. Due to its pine smell, pine tar soap, an organic soap, is known to offer a variety of deodorizing benefits. Men are known to enjoy its fresh, pine scent. Pine tar has been traditionally associated with homemade, organic, and natural soap-making.

Pine tar soap and shampoo has also been proven effective in soothing psoriasis and eczema, easing inflammation of the body, while offering a cure to itching associated with bug bites. It also makes for an excellent choice as soap for men.

Traditional Use in Soap

Pine tar has been a commonly seen ingredient in soaps, spanning hundreds of years. It is still used today, especially in natural soaps and organic soaps.

  • Pine tar and pine oil has long been used in soap. It can be irritating to some people: mixing it with the fats and other oils found in soap dilutes the pine tar and pine oil so it does not cause irritation.
  • Black soap is a very different product. It is made from coal tar and used to treat dandruff, kill lice, and treat similar skin conditions to pine tar.
  • Black soap made with coal tar is said to have analgesic properties, soothing the itching and burning sensation associated with common skin conditions. Pine tar soap and black soap are not the same product, but offer similar uses. Coal tar is said to have an unpleasant and strong odor that can be covered up with essential oils.

Other Uses of Pine Tar Soap

When combined with other ingredients, pine tar can be used for many applications for the skin and hair. No feminine scent here! Pine tar and pine oil can be used with ingredients such as oatmeal, another natural substance that soothes the skin, and adds mild exfoliating properties. It is effective in soothing the inflammation, skin, scalp and itching due to dandruff.

You can find pine tar in natural and organic soaps with other natural ingredients. Pine tar is an all-natural substance that does no harm to the environment. So when you use Dr. Squatch’s Pine Tar it will make you feel good all over.

blog.drsquatch.com

Pine tar soap has long history and still used for medicinal properties

By Leah Fletcher

Pine tar is a substance that has been used for centuries. It has a variety of uses but is primarily used as an ingredient in soap. You may have seen it and wondered what pine tar soap is, and why it’s used.

Pine soap is used in soothing treatments for skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis. It is also said to relieve itching caused by bug bites.

Forty-year old Clinton Boyd remembers, summer visits to the backwoods of North Carolina, where he spent summers on his grandparent’s farm. “I remember being thankful for the pine tar soap and ointment my grandmother made. They helped keep the multitudes of swarming mosquitoes away during those hot summer months.”

Boyd recalls that on the farm there were more uses for pine tar than medicinal. “Pine tar was used in veterinary medicine to treat a variety of conditions for cattle and chickens. It was used in medicinal applications as a treatment for various skin conditions as well.”

Today, pine tar has a wide variety of applications — from maritime uses, medicinal uses, to the production of soaps — and it was a great money-maker in the post-independence periods of the United States.

Pine tar soap’s main ingredient, pine tar, is a sticky substance that results from burning the wood of pine trees. Historian Thomas Gamble, an expert on the history, production, and distribution and consumption of pine tar, wrote about its origins. Gamble notes the use of pine tar originated in Scandinavia and was used as a preservative to protect wood from the harsh winter conditions as well as the bottoms of Nordic skis.

It later became an important export from the American colonies as many areas were covered in pine forests. North Carolina and South Carolina were major U.S. exporters. Ropes and rigging on ships were sealed with pine tar to prevent rotting from the harsh conditions and exposure to sea water. British sailors were nicknamed “tar” for this reason. Pine tar is used on the handles of baseball bats because the stickiness of the substance supports batter griping.

Pine Tar Soap: Benefits and Uses

Pine tar soap is a natural soap which has long been touted for its medicinal benefits in the treatment of skin conditions, plus treatment of dandruff, according to Jim Champion, a candle and natural and organic soap maker.

Champion explains that pine tar, as well as pine oil, has a strong pine smell when it is combined with other scented oils as well as essential oils for use on the body. “It is said to have antibacterial and anti-fungal qualities and is useful to soothe and treat symptoms of poison ivy and oak.”

Pine soap, Champion says, is also used to treat skin conditions such as eczema and psoriasis and it relieves the itching caused by bug bites. Additionally, he says, it is a common additive in shampoo and is used to treat the inflammation and itching of the scalp due to dandruff.

Pine Tar Soap (Photo: ironhillsoapworks.com)

Traditional Use in Soap

“Pine tar has been a common ingredient in soaps, spanning hundreds of years. It is still used today, especially in natural soaps and organic soaps,” notes Champion.

“Pine tar soap is refuted to be irritating to some people, but the fats and other oils found in soap dilutes the pine tar and pine oil so it does not cause irritation” illuminates Champion.

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Coal tar soap, another black soap, defined by Champion as a very different product with similar skin treatments and results, made from coal tar and used to treat dandruff, kill lice, and treat similar skin conditions. Pine tar soap and black soap are not the same product, but offer similar uses, opines Champion, who notes that coal tar soap’s pungent odor can be masked with essential oils”.

Because pine tar soap has antifungal and antimicrobial properties, Champion believes it is perceived as an effective method for treating certain bacterial and fungal infections, such as athlete’s foot or jock itch. It is also commonly used by people to treat unpleasant odors of the feet or armpits.

Clinton Boyd, when weighing in on the current benefits of pine tar soap, says he still uses pine tar soap and enjoys its fresh, pine scent, a holdover from his youth.

www.philasun.com

Lice Treatment Warnings

Before using any product or treatment, you need to determine whether it’s appropriate in your specific situation. A head lice treatment may be appropriate and safe for one person, but carry unacceptable risks for another person of a different age or health status.

That’s why it’s so important to consult your own doctor, before beginning any treatment. While I was researching head lice treatments, I found information that surprised me about possible health risks associated with ingredients in certain head lice products and home remedies.

I include a few examples on this page to demonstrate why it’s important to do thorough research.

The following examples are NOT comprehensive or complete. Always consult your doctor before starting any treatment.

Allergies

People can become allergic to any ingredient in any product. If someone in your family has allergies, then you probably already know how important it is to read ingredient lists carefully for known allergens.

Even if there are no known allergies, products containing common allergens should often be tested by limiting exposure to only a very small amount at first, in a limited area, to see if a reaction occurs. Your doctor can advise you on this.

Plastic

NEVER use plastic wrap to cover kids’ hair. Use a shower cap or towel. Plastic wrap and plastic bags pose a suffocation risk.

Pesticides

Pesticides are not necessary to deal with head lice, and they should not be used on children. (You can get rid of lice and nits by combing alone. The only reason to use pesticides or any other product other than a good nit comb is to make the process easier and/or quicker … a potential benefit that does not justify the risk of putting pesticides on a child’s head.)

Lindane

According to an FDA Public Health Advisory, Lindane puts patients “at risk for serious neurologic adverse events, and even death, particularly with early retreatment”.

Permethrin

According to the Journal of Pesticide Reform, permethrin «is a neurotoxin. Symptoms include tremors, incoordination, elevated body temperature, increased aggressive behavior, and disruption of learning. Laboratory tests suggest that permethrin is more acutely toxic to children than to adults.»

Pyrethrins and pyrethroids

According to articles published at the National Institutes of Health, pyrethrins and pyrethroids “can induce adverse health effects, more often in acute poisoning, but also due to chronic exposure.”

Malathion

According to an article posted by the National Pediculosis Association, malathion is «chemically related to nerve gases developed during World War II. For decades, scientists have been debating whether such pesticides cause birth defects, cancers, and other health problems.

Studies have shown links between regular exposure to malathion and various human maladies, including non-Hodgkins lymphoma, childhood leukemia, anemia, chromosome damage, and weakened immune systems . Malathion and other pesticides are especially dangerous to children, who are more vulnerable to neurotoxins than adults.»

Alcohol

It’s probably never appropriate to apply an alcohol-based product to a child’s scalp and let it sit for any length of time. I would certainly never do this without asking my doctor first. For instance, trying the Listerine home remedy would likely not be safe for kids.

Coal Tar

I’ve seen Denorex and other coal-tar shampoos recommended as effective for treating and preventing head lice infestations. However, coal tar in high concentrations is classified by the World Health Organization as a cancer-causing agent. So, while I might consider using a coal tar shampoo once to fight a lice infestation, I would not use it regularly for anyone in my family.

Essential Oils

Lots of lice products contain essential oils. These are intended either to smother/kill lice, or simply to repel them. Often the marketers of these products promote them as totally safe to use, even on babies and young children.

However, many essential oils are not well studied. Some of them may well be safe to use frequently … but because they haven’t undergone rigorous controlled testing, it could be there are subtle harmful effects that haven’t been discovered yet.

Tea Tree Oil & Lavender Oil

For example, during my research into lice products I discovered that according to the National Institutes of Health, tea tree oil and lavender oil may have subtle hormonal effects when used long-term.

So, while I might consider using a product containing tea tree oil as a one-time event to treat head lice on my son, I would definitely not have him use a tea tree oil shampoo regularly in order to prevent head lice.

Eucalyptus Oil

According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, «Eucalyptus oil should not be applied to the face or nose of children under age 2. People with asthma should use eucalyptus oil with caution due to the herbs’ potential to trigger an asthma attack. Pregnant and breastfeeding women should not use eucalyptus.»

Peppermint Oil

According to the American Academy of Family Physicians, «Peppermint oil should not be used internally or on or near the face in infants and young children because of its potential to cause bronchospasm, tongue spasms, and, possibly, respiratory arrest. However, the amount of peppermint in over-the-counter medications, topical preparations, and herbal teas is likely safe in pregnant and lactating women and in young children.»

Rosemary Oil

Rosemary can stimulate uterine contractions at high doses. Pregnant women should either check with their doctors or avoid rosemary oil altogether.

Mineral Oil

According to The American Head Lice Information Center, «mineral oil (including baby oil) is not recommended because it can be harmful to mucous membranes».

See also:  Stop Head Lice From Coming Back - Simple Ways To Repel, Avoid, Prevent Head Lice and Nits, RemedyGrove

Mayonnaise

Do not leave mayonnaise on a child’s head overnight; it will turn rancid and the child could accidentally consume some of it.

Pregnancy

Pregnant women should check with their doctors before applying any treatment for head lice (either to themselves or to kids).

Oil and Petroleum

If you use a remedy with oil or petroleum products in it, you may need to shampoo the hair several times with clarifying shampoo or dishwashing liquid to wash all the oil out.

www.kidsheadlice.com

Benefits Of Pine Tar Soap

May 5, 2011 , Harri Daniel , Comments Off on Benefits Of Pine Tar Soap

Benefits of Pine Tar Soap

Pine tar was commonly used in ship building in the ancient days but is now used for skin treatment as it is believed to have antimicrobial effects. Today, pine tar soap is used in a number of applications, from treating injuries on animals to wood treatment to soaps and shampoos.

1. Antiseptic effect
Pine tar soap is derived from heating pine wood. Due to its antiseptic nature, pine tar soap was commonly used to treat minor injuries on animals. Now most folks use it to make railroad ties and in wood treatment. Additionally, its skin-soothing properties make it useful in making shampoos, oils and soaps, and doctors even prescribe it for specific medicinal purposes.

2. Treats skin conditions
Pine tar soap is useful for treating a wide range of skin disorders, including psoriasis and eczema. It can help with the dryness associated with eczema and psoriasis, preventing the progression of scaling that often make you appear old and worn out. However, you should not use lotions made from pine tar soap if you have sensitive skin.

3. Anti-inflammatory effects
Its soothing and anti-inflammatory properties make it useful for the cure of dandruff, insect bites, acne, hives, eczema, seborrhea and contact dermatitis. You can also use it to treat blistery rashes caused by poison oak, poison sumac and poison ivy. However, it takes about three weeks before you notice significant change on your skin.

4. Good for smelly feet
Pine tar soap is also believed to have soothing effects. It is well-known for its antifungal and antimicrobial effects, which make it an excellent deodorizer for smelly feet and armpits. On the other hand, its antiseptic effects make it useful for treating minor scrapes and bug bites.
While there are no side effects associated with use of pine tar soap, most find its taste acrid and bitter. On the other hand, there is no evidence the soap is safe for treating skin disorders.

benefitof.net

How Useful Tar Soap Is

The benefits of tar soap are knowb by many, but not all of them believe that soap with such an unpleasant odor can help get rid of a huge number of skin problems and even the ones that are realted to hair.

How tar soap is special

The main component of tar soap is a birch tar, which is a unique tool that has anti-inflammatory and healing effects. Many medical ointments of a high-performance have birch ta in its composition, for example, everyone knows Vishnevsky ointment. The tar is a kind of extract, which, like the birch sap, is obtained from birch. After manipulations the tar is introduced into the soap, which does not contain any chemical elements, such as flavor enchancers, preservatives or dyes. Thus, tar soap is a natural product, known for its high antiseptic properties and beneficial effects on the skin.

How to use tar soap

Tar soap helps to heal various skin rashes. Teenagers are recommended to wash using this soap once a day. You can wash your hair with tar soap for the treatment or prevention of lice, as well as to eliminate dandruff.

  • As hygienic means, dermatologists recommend tar soap for people suffering from such diseases, as psoriasis, lichen, demodex, dermatitis.
  • Tar soap also helps to get rid of such diseases, as abrasions, allergic reactions on the skin of some other cosmetic hygiene, atopic dermatitis, pyoderma, seborrhea, eczema, scabies.
  • This soap is effective in the fight against bed sores, cracked heel , frostbite, burns.
  • Tar soap can be used for bathing children, people who have lesions on the skin, including long -healing wounds and scratches.
  • Tar soap helps in the fight against various pests that colonizing plants. It’s enough to make a soapy solution and sprinkle it into the areas of the skin damaged by insects.
  • Pets can be bathed with tar soap for flea prevention and for depriving the mites.
  • On the basis of this soap a large number of masks for the face and body are created. Means on the basis of tar are perticulatrly effective when used after a sauna or bath.
  • After using tar soap for the face , the result becomes noticeable in two weeks as the skin gets rid of acne, pores become narrower and clean, redness and peeling fade.

How useful is tar soap for hair

It has been observed that if you regularly use tar soap to wash your hair, then a month later it becomes more lush, strong, healthy, its structurey improves sicnificantly and hair loss is stopped.

We recommend using tar soap for oily hair twice a week and one shoudl use it for with dry and normal hair once a week. Thus, it is desirable to change the usual balm decoction of burdock or nettle. This will simplify the process of combing hair, make it more shiny, strong and healthy. After about two months of using tar soap to wash your hair, you need to take a break for a month, not to dry up the scalp.

The use of tar soap for women’s health

Gynecologists recommend using tar soap as a means for personal hygiene. Due to its unique composition, the regular use this soap helps prevent thrush infection, relieve irritation after shaving or epilation fo bikini area.

euromd.com

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