Upload Image For Insect Identification and Bug Identification — Pest PRO

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It Works

Pestpro was created to be the quickest and most accurate form of insect identification known online.

How it works: So what you do is simply upload your bug image and have us identify your insect or spider. You will get an email in your inbox as soon as it has been identified. We identify the following: Spiders, beetles, ants, wasp, bed bugs, butterflies, earwigs, hornets, flies, roaches, termites, and so much more.

Correct insect identification is our #1 goal.

As we invest more into our site, Pestpro will become more and more accurate. Only professional identifiers with years of experience havce access to even help with our identification process.

How do we keep our identification accuracy so high?

We simply only allow identifiers join our team who have a proven track record in entomology. Most of which have a degree or certification in the field of entomology.

What’s the score for at the bottom?

This is to help us track our key players and to bring recognition to those who make Pestpro possible.

pestproapp.com

Mayflies

Mayflies most likely get their common name from their typical emergence during the month of May, though they can emerge earlier or later depending on the species and environmental conditions.

Despite their name, mayflies are not actually flies. They are aquatic insects and are an important food source for fish and reptiles. Their most distinguishing features are their two or three tails that are often longer than their bodies. Read on to learn how to get rid of mayflies.

Pest Stats

Color

Varies; dull-colored body with clear wings

Shape

1/32 of an inch to a little over 1 inch

Antennae

Region

Found throughout U.S.

Mayfly Photos

Dorsal view of a mayfly on a white background

Profile of a yellow mayfly

Photo of a mayfly on black background

Mayflies most likely get their common name from their typical emergence during the month of May, though they can emerge earlier or later depending on the species and environmental conditions.

Despite their name, mayflies are not actually flies. They are aquatic insects and are an important food source for fish and reptiles. Their most distinguishing features are their two or three tails that are often longer than their bodies. Read on to learn how to get rid of mayflies.

Pest Stats

Color

Varies; dull-colored body with clear wings

Shape

1/32 of an inch to a little over 1 inch

Antennae

Region

Found throughout U.S.

Habits

Nymphs feed on microscopic algae and organic matter in the water. Adults do not eat because they don’t have functioning mouthparts, but this isn’t an issue because mayflies only live as mature adults for a few days.

Habitat

As mayflies are primarily an aquatic species, they spend most of their lives developing in the water. They are common around freshwater sources such as streams, lakes or ponds.

Adults leave the water to mate, and females will lay their eggs while flying low over the water or in the water directly. Mayflies are often seen as a sign of healthy water ecosystems because they are very sensitive to pollutants.

Threats

Mayflies are nuisance pests and cannot bite or sting. They are, however, very attracted to light, which can result in massive swarms around buildings at night and piles of dead flies below lights and windows in the morning. In areas that see large swarms, mayflies could affect driving conditions and visibility.

For allergy sufferers, mayflies could be a source of seasonal allergies. When they die, their molted skin and bodies break up and are easily carried by the wind.

Mayfly Prevention

While there is little that can be done to prevent mayflies altogether, there are steps that can be taken to minimize the severity of the numbers around the home. Mercury-vapor lamps should be replaced with high-pressure sodium vapor lamps and white incandescent and fluorescent bulbs should be replaced with yellow bulbs. Homeowners should also ensure all screens are intact, and seal holes and cracks that might permit entry.

www.pestworld.org

Identifying Insect Pests

Find out how to deal with insect pests while leaving beneficial bugs alone.

Related To:

Cabbage Looper Caterpillar

This pest is very destructive due to its voracious consumption of plants in the cabbage family.

Photo by: Image courtesy of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Slide Set, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Bugwood.org

Image courtesy of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company Slide Set, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, Bugwood.org

Tools and Materials

  • notebook
  • magnifying glass
  • camera
  • jar (for collecting samples)
  • insect field guide

Step 1: Examine the Plant

If you suspect an insect is causing problems, examine the plant. Check the leaves, top and bottom, looking for insects, caterpillars, and egg masses. As you touch the leaves, watch for scurrying or flying insects. Jot down notes, take a photo, or collect a sample so you can research the possible culprits using a field guide or gardening reference. Wait to spray until you’ve made a positive ID. Many insecticides will kill not only pests but also beneficial insects, including predatory insects that eat the pests and pollinators like honeybees.

If a plant is struggling, consider non-pest causes first. For example, if you see a wilted plant, check soil moisture. Gardeners sometimes mistake symptoms of nutritional deficiencies — yellowing leaves, stunting, weak growth, poor production — as indications of pests. If you see symptoms like these, consider testing your soil nutrients and pH levels.

See also:  Preventing Fleas

Step 2: Identify the Type of Pest

Entomologists (insect specialists) often categorize insects by how they feed.

Chewing insects eat leaves. Symptoms include holes, ragged edges, and «skeletonizing» — eating the tissue between leaf veins. Examples include weevils, caterpillars, flea beetles, and Japanese beetles. Look for the telltale frass (excrement) of the larger of these pests.

Sucking insects pierce a hole in plant tissue and suck out the fluids. Signs include stippling on foliage or silvery bronze leaves and discolored blooms. Examples include spider mites, aphids, thrips, and leafhoppers. These pests often leave behind moltings — the outer skin they shed as they grow.

Other insects, such as wireworms, feed on roots. Cutworms feed at ground level, girdling young seedlings.

Once you’ve identified that you indeed do have a pest problem, determine whether control is really necessary. Is the damage located on the leaves of a plant you’ll be harvesting in a week or two? Control measures may not be warranted. However, many pests multiply quickly so keep a close eye on pest populations.

Once you’ve identified the pest, research its life cycle and habits. Some pests, such as leaf miners that tunnel into plant tissue, will not be affected by sprays. Controls will be more effective if you catch the insect in the most vulnerable part of its life cycle.

www.hgtv.com

Уважаемый абонент!

Доступ к информационному ресурсу ограничен на основании Федерального закона от 27 июля 2006 г. N 149-ФЗ «Об информации, информационных технологиях и о защите информации».

Доступ ограничен по решению суда или по иным основаниям, установленным законодательством Российской Федерации.

Сетевой адрес, позволяющий идентифицировать сайт в сети «Интернет», включен в Единый Реестр доменных имен, указателей страниц сайтов сети «Интернет» и сетевых адресов, позволяющих идентифицировать сайты в сети «Интернет», содержащие информацию, распространение которой в Российской Федерации запрещено.

Сетевой адрес, позволяющий идентифицировать сайт в сети «Интернет», включен в Реестр доменных имен, указателей страниц сайтов в сети «Интернет» и сетевых адресов, позволяющих идентифицировать сайты в сети «Интернет», содержащие информацию, распространяемую с нарушением исключительных прав.

Сетевой адрес, позволяющий идентифицировать сайт в сети «Интернет», включен в Реестр доменных имен, указателей страниц сайтов в сети «Интернет» и сетевых адресов, позволяющих идентифицировать сайты в сети «Интернет», содержащие призывы к массовым беспорядкам, осуществлению экстремистской деятельности, участию в массовых (публичных) мероприятиях, проводимых с нарушением установленного порядка.

Сетевой адрес, позволяющий идентифицировать сайт в сети «Интернет», включен в Федеральный список экстремистских материалов.

Сетевой адрес, позволяющий идентифицировать сайт в сети «Интернет», включен в Реестр нарушителей прав субъектов персональных данных.

www.growweedeasy.com

Bed Bug Size: A Growing Problem

In order to properly identify a bed bug, it helps to know exactly what to look for. Characteristics such as color, shape and size can help you differentiate bed bugs from other insects.

Bed bugs have two antennae, six legs and oval-shaped bodies. They’re relatively flat and small, with bed bug sizes ranging from 1 mm to 7 mm, depending on their age and life cycle stage. Coloration also varies with age and how recently they’ve blood fed. While immature bed bugs — also referred to as nymphs — are semi-translucent, adults tend to be reddish-brown before a blood meal and bright red immediately after blood feeding. Check out the bed bugs pictures shown here to get an idea of their actual size and to familiarize yourself with their characteristics.

Bed Bug Pictures: Actual Size

The first thing most people do when trying to identify a potential bed bug is to examine bed bug pictures. The actual size of bed bugs can vary, depending on life stage and age. To help understand bed bugs and their life cycle, here’s a general bed bug size comparison of each stage:

  • Eggs are tiny, about the size of a pin head (1 mm)
  • 1st stage nymph (1.5 mm)
  • 2nd stage nymph (2 mm)
  • 3rd stage nymph (2.5 mm)
  • 4th stage nymph (3 mm), about the size of a sesame seed
  • 5th stage nymph (4.5 mm)
  • Adult bed bugs (5-7 mm or 3/16-1/4 inch), about the size of an apple seed

The life cycle of a bed bug includes multiple nymphal stages, with the insects blood feeding between each nymphal stage. Bed bugs typically mature in two to six weeks (depending on environmental temperature and availability of blood meal hosts) and adults can survive for six months to a year without blood, however the females must have a blood meal in order to reproduce. Ideal temperatures for bed bug propagation are above 70°F. Considering a single female can lay between 200 and 500 eggs in a lifetime (10-50 eggs laid at a time) even a single bed bug sighting should be taken seriously to help curtail the reproductive cycle of these insects. Pest control professionals should be consulted as early as possible to identify and control a potential infestation.

Bed Bug Size Comparison and Lookalikes

Bed bugs can easily be mistaken for some other types of insects, such as bat bugs, swallow bugs, lice, carpet beetles and fleas. Whether you’re interested in familiarizing yourself with bed bug characteristics before traveling or trying to determine whether or not you have an issue in your home or other areas, it’s important to understand some of their basic characteristics.

In general, adult bed bugs are:

  • About the size of an apple seed (5-7 mm or 3/16-1/4 inch long)
  • Flat, oval-shaped and reddish-brown (if not blood fed recently)
  • Balloon-like and bright red (if blood fed recently)
  • Produce a foul, somewhat musty odor
  • Not known to jump or fly, but walk instead
  • Unlikely to live on human hosts, but come out from hiding spots to blood feed

It can be difficult for untrained individuals to correctly identify bed bugs based solely on the aforementioned characteristics like size and/or color, but having this information, in addition to bed bug images, can help make the process a bit it easier. If you’re unsure whether or not an insect you’ve seen is a bed bug or are concerned that you may have an infestation, an on-site assessment by a professional pest control technician is recommended. Consider contacting Terminix® today for a FREE inspection, and find out how our customized treatments can help eliminate bed bugs.

Do Earwigs Bite?

If you shudder a little when you think about earwigs, you’re probably not alone. They’ve developed quite a nasty reputation, thanks to urban legends (mostly false) that have been circulating for years. But are they harmful?

The Lifespans of Insects With Short Lives

Many insects, such as butterflies, have a lifespan that occurs in four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Other insects, such as grasshoppers, do not have a pupal stage and instead go through three stages: egg, nymph, and adult. The length of each stage can vary based on many things, from the insect species to the temperature outside—but what some insects share in common is a very short adult stage. Keep reading to learn about five insects with some of the shortest adult stages in their lifespan.

The Return of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

The change of seasons from summer to fall means many things: leaves changing colors, dropping temperatures, and—depending on where you live—stink bugs sneaking into your home. Stink bugs were named for their distinct ability to emit an unpleasant odor when they are threatened or disturbed by predators like lizards or birds. This also means that if stink bugs enter your home and feel threatened, you’ll be faced with dealing with their strong smell in your house. As we head into fall, you might find yourself with more active stink bugs than usual, so it’s important to know the basics about these smelly insects.

See also:  What - s the Difference Between Bugs and Insects, Mental Floss

What are Earwigs?

Most people have probably heard of earwigs at some point or another. These creepy-looking insects are associated with some urban myths. Learn the truth about earwigs, including what attracts them and how to help get rid of them.

ARE TICKS DANGEROUS?

The majority of ticks will deliver painless bites without any noticeable symptoms. However, some ticks can carry a variety of bacteria and pathogens for disease. Although not all ticks are dangerous, you don’t want to risk coming into contact with these blood-sucking insects.

ARE TICKS DANGEROUS?

The majority of ticks will deliver painless bites without any noticeable symptoms. However, some ticks can carry a variety of bacteria and pathogens for disease. Although not all ticks are dangerous, you don’t want to risk coming into contact with these blood-sucking insects.

Are Bed Bugs Contagious?

Bed bugs are not too picky about where and when they catch a ride and don’t necessarily have a preferred mode of transportation, so it’s no surprise how many people wonder, are bed bugs contagious?

Related Articles

Do Earwigs Bite?

If you shudder a little when you think about earwigs, you’re probably not alone. They’ve developed quite a nasty reputation, thanks to urban legends (mostly false) that have been circulating for years. But are they harmful?

Cluster Flies In Your Home

If you’re like many homeowners, you’ve dealt with annoying flies ruining your summer barbecues and outdoor dinner parties. You may have even become accustomed to whipping out the flypaper and heavy-duty bug zappers the minute you hear the familiar buzz of a fly. These annoying pests are likely house flies, which can pose significant health risks to you and your family. But have you ever seen large, sluggish flies loitering inside your home in the autumn and winter? They may be cluster flies.

Tips to Get Rid of Stink Bugs in Your House

Now that it’s fall, it’s officially indoor stink bug season. Before it becomes winter, brown marmorated stink bugs are looking for comfortable overwintering sites to spend the cold months—and that can often mean that they may find a way to sneak into your house. While the odor that a stink bug releases is not dangerous, they are definitely a nuisance. Luckily, there are steps you can take to get rid of stink bugs in your house—without having to deal with the unpleasant smell.

What are Sand Fleas?

Many people love going to the beach to spend time in the sun, sand, and water. But they might not love some of the nuisances that live at the beach or in the ocean, such as gnats or jellyfish. But, what about the sand flea, a small critter that can be found in moist areas such as under rocks or debris. Keep reading to learn exactly what sand fleas are and if you need to worry about them.

The Lifespans of Insects With Short Lives

Many insects, such as butterflies, have a lifespan that occurs in four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Other insects, such as grasshoppers, do not have a pupal stage and instead go through three stages: egg, nymph, and adult. The length of each stage can vary based on many things, from the insect species to the temperature outside—but what some insects share in common is a very short adult stage. Keep reading to learn about five insects with some of the shortest adult stages in their lifespan.

The Return of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

The change of seasons from summer to fall means many things: leaves changing colors, dropping temperatures, and—depending on where you live—stink bugs sneaking into your home. Stink bugs were named for their distinct ability to emit an unpleasant odor when they are threatened or disturbed by predators like lizards or birds. This also means that if stink bugs enter your home and feel threatened, you’ll be faced with dealing with their strong smell in your house. As we head into fall, you might find yourself with more active stink bugs than usual, so it’s important to know the basics about these smelly insects.

www.terminix.com

How to Get Rid of Thief Ants in Your Home

Mathisa_s / Getty Images

The thief ant, which is also called the grease ant, is a very common ant in homes—especially in kitchens—across much of the U.S. It is so tiny—as small as 1/32 inch long—that it can easily slip into homes through cracks and make its nests in tiny crevices both within the home and outside. This ant is often confused with the pharaoh ant, which is actually slightly larger in size.

Identification

As shown in the picture, the thief ant

  • is 1/32 to 1/16 inch long.
  • has very small eyes in relation to the size of the head.
  • is yellow, bronze, light or dark brown.
  • has a body that is very smooth and shiny.

Common names for this species are:

  • Thief ant because it habitually nests near—or even inside —the nests of other ants, and then steals their food and their brood or larvae.
  • Grease ant because it prefers to feed on grease and high-protein foods (such as meats, cheeses, seeds, or dead insects).
  • Solenopsis molesta because this is its scientific name.

Thief vs. Pharaoh

Because of its size, this ant is often confused with pharaoh ant. But the main differences between the two are:

  • Thief ants are more likely to have an indoor nest than are pharaoh ants.
  • Thief ants have 2 clubbed antennae, pharaoh ants have 3 clubs on their antennae.
  • Both thief ants and pharaoh ants are omnivorous—eating just about anything, but thief ants prefer grease and high protein foods, while pharaoh ants prefer to feed on sweets.
  • Thief ants are yellowish to brownish in color, whereas the pharaoh ant is more reddish with black markings on its abdomen.

Populations

Grease ant colonies are generally small in size, perhaps because of their thieving nature. However, a single colony can have a number of queens. This ant most commonly enters homes in mid to late summer.

The nest will often be large and connected by tunnels to the nearby nests of other ants—providing access by which they are able to steal their food. Outdoor nests may be under rocks, around foundations, in bare soil or decaying wood. Indoors, they may nest anywhere there is a small crack, especially behind baseboards, in wall voids, beneath floors, in cupboards, and similar spaces.

The ants will travel far distances for food, then will set trails to that food. Indoors, these trails may flow along baseboards and in cabinets; outdoors, the thief ants often trail along the branches of trees or shrubs or even along electrical wires. Because this ant is so small, it can easily get into food packages to eat and contaminate the food.

See also:  Mint Leaf Beetles - Chrysolina herbacea - Chrysolina menthastri - UK Safari

Control Recommendations

The first step in controlling any ant species in and around your home is knowing what type of ant it is. This is important because baits are often the best option for control, but different ants have different food preferences—and baits are not effective for outdoor-nesting thief ants. Even within this species, control recommendations vary depending on whether the thief/grease ant colony is within the home or outdoors.

Indoor Colonies

Thief ants, or grease ants, that are found to be nesting indoors are best eliminated through baiting. This can be as simple as placing a small amount of greasy bait near the areas in which the ants have been seen. But for greater success, the Iowa State University Department of Entomology recommends the use of chemical ant baits mixed with grease or oil:

  • Mix a chemical ant bait, such as Terro or Drax Ant Bait, with grease or oil, such as vegetable oil and peanut butter.
  • This mixing will require a bit of trial and error as exact proportions have not been documented, but you will need to add enough grease to the bait so it is attractive to the ants, but not so much that it will dilute the active ingredient below the level of effectiveness.
  • Add a single drop of grease or oil to 5 to 10 drops of bait on a piece of wax paper. Place the baited wax paper in the area in which ants have been seen. If the ants are not attracted to the bait, add another drop or two of grease, or try another oil.
  • Other options can be used instead of wax paper, such as the backside of masking tape, small squares of cardboard or paper, or directly on the floor or surface where the ants are trailing.

Warning

Always keep baits out of reach of children and pets, and follow directions on the pesticide label.

Outdoor Colonies

This is one for which the standard ant recommendation of baits is not effective if the ants are nesting outdoors. Rather, the best option is to locate the nest and treat it directly. To locate a nest, follow the trail of ants backward from the food source.

However, because these ants are so small and will nest in areas that are distant or hard to reach, it can be difficult, or even impractical, to locate outdoor nests. So, if the outdoor nest cannot be found, a perimeter treatment of the home can help to keep outdoor-nesting ants from coming indoors to forage for food—or set up new nests.

It is, however, important to ensure that the invading ant is a thief/grease ant, and not a pharaoh ant, as treatment varies greatly for these two ant species.

Prevention

In addition to treating for ants, there are a number of methods for helping to prevent ants from entering the home to forage for food or seek shelter.

www.thespruce.com

Citrus pest and disease problems — solutions to citrus problems

Citrus trees are one of the most productive and easy to grow trees in the home garden but just as we love to reap their rewards so do pests. Diseases can also take their toll. Here is a list of the most common aliments of the citrus tree and tips on how to overcome them.

Citrus Leaf Miner

Citrus leafminer (Phyllocnistis citrella) tunnels through the young leaves of citrus trees which creates silvery lines. Finally, it curls the leaf into a shelter and pupates within. This can severely distort the leaves, but mature trees are not likely to be seriously damaged. To protect young trees, spray new growth thoroughly with Searles Pest Gun .

Two-spotted Mite

Two-spotted mite (Tetranychus urticae) affects ornamentals, fruit trees and some vegetables. Affected leaves have a mottled appearance or can be bronzed or shrivelled. Leave them to natural predators, but if the problem is severe, spray Searles Rose Pro .

Bronze orange bug on citrus

Watch out for these brightly coloured bronze orange bugs on citrus trees and flowers. They suck the sap from young stems and damage new growth. They give off a bad smelling substance when threatened so its best to spray them with Searles Conguard to control their numbers.

Fruit Fly on citrus

The Queensland fruit fly is common in the warmer times of year. After mating, the female lays her eggs under the skin of the fruit. When the maggot-like larvae hatch, they burrow deeper into the fruit causing it to rot. Searles Fruit Fly Trap is an effective reusable trap to monitor and control fruit fly activity around vegetables, particularly tomatoes, and around citrus trees. It contains a wick that attracts male fruit flies, traps and kills them, stopping the breeding cycle.

Gall wasp on citrus stems

Small female wasps lays her eggs inside the branch of a citrus when the weather starts to warm up in spring. By summer time new tiny wasps escape from the swollen growth leaving the branch deformed. The citrus gall wasp does not directly kill the citrus tree but when repeated attacks occur it severely deforms the tree branches inhibiting normal growth. If you see lumps starting to appear cut the branch off promptly and remove the affected branch away from the tree.

Scale on citrus

Scale found on the leaves and stems of citrus are from sap sucking insects laying their eggs underneath the protection of a hard waxy dome shell. Once the immature ‘crawlers’ hatch they spread and multiply rapidly. Severe infestations can lead to branch dieback, leaf drop and yellowing of the leaves. Control red scale, white and pink wax scale with an organic oil spray Searles Ecofend Natural Solutions Fruit & Garden . Some soft scale, such as white wax scale and black scale secrete a sticky like substance ‘honeydew’ which then attracts the fungus sooty mould and ants to the plant. The ants protect the scale from predators, letting them proliferate even further. Treat the ants first.

Melanose

Melanose is a fungus that can multiply quickly in wet weather. Little dark brown, raised spots appear on immature leaves, twigs and fruit. In severe infestations, Melanose can cause fruit disfigurations and wood rot. Remove dead wood from your citrus where the spores lay and spray with Searles Copper Oxychloride when fungus is first sighted.

More details on melanose

Large citrus butterfly caterpillar

The small and large citrus butterfly caterpillar can strip citrus trees of their leaves and produce a strong foul odour when disturbed. This smelly, spiky and unattractive caterpillar will turn into a beautiful butterfly. If infestation is severe, spray tree leaves and branches with a natural Pyrethrum insecticide such as Searles Bug Beater . Alternatively you can hand pick them and squash them if you can handle the smell.

www.searlesgardening.com.au

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