L-tryptophan Uses, Side Effects — Warnings

L-tryptophan

Generic Name: L-tryptophan (L TRIP toe fan)
Brand Name: Tryptan

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Apr 26, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

What is L-tryptophan?

L-tryptophan is an amino acid that is made from plant or animal sources. L-tryptophan is known as an «essential» amino acid because the body does not produce it. L-tryptophan is important to the functions of many organs in the body. When you consume L-tryptophan, your body absorbs it and changes it to eventually become a hormone called serotonin. Serotonin transmits signals between your nerve cells and also narrows (constricts) blood vessels. The amount of serotonin in the brain can affect mood.

L-tryptophan has been used in alternative medicine as a possibly effective aid in treating symptoms of premenstrual dysphoric disorder syndrome (such as mood swings and irritability), and to help people quit smoking.

L-tryptophan has also been used to treat facial pain, to relieve bruxism (tooth grinding), and to improve athletic performance. However, research has shown that L-tryptophan may not be effective in treating these conditions.

Other uses not proven with research include treating sleep problems (insomnia), anxiety, depression, and attention deficit hyperactivty disorder (ADHD).

It is not certain whether L-tryptophan is effective in treating any medical condition. Medicinal use of this product has not been approved by the FDA. L-tryptophan should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor.

L-tryptophan is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

It may be dangerous to purchase L-tryptophan on the Internet or from vendors outside of the United States. The manufacture, sale, and distribution of L-tryptophan outside of the U.S. does not comply with the regulations of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the safe use of this medication.

L-tryptophan may also be used for purposes not listed in this product guide.

Important Information

Follow all directions on the product label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use this product if you are allergic to tryptophan.

Ask a doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider if it is safe for you to use this product if you have:

eosinophilia (high levels of a certain type of white blood cells); or

a muscle disorder (such as fibromyalgia).

L-tryptophan is considered likely unsafe to use during pregnancy. Do not use this product without medical advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether L-tryptophan passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this product without medical advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give any herbal/health supplement to a child without medical advice.

How should I take L-tryptophan?

When considering the use of herbal supplements, seek the advice of your doctor. You may also consider consulting a practitioner who is trained in the use of herbal/health supplements.

If you choose to use L-tryptophan, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider. Do not use more of this product than is recommended on the label.

Call your doctor if the condition you are treating with L-tryptophan does not improve, or if it gets worse while using this product.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra L-tryptophan to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking L-tryptophan?

Avoid taking an herbal supplement containing St. John’s wort at the same time you are taking L-tryptophan.

Avoid using L-tryptophan together with other herbal/health supplements that can also cause drowsiness, including 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), calamus, California poppy, catnip, hops, Jamaican dogwood, kava, St. John’s wort, skullcap, valerian, or yerba mansa.

Avoid using L-tryptophan together with other herbal/health supplements that can raise your serotonin levels. This includes 5-HTP, Hawaiian baby woodrose, and S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe).

L-tryptophan may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

L-tryptophan side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Although not all side effects are known, L-tryptophan is thought to be possibly unsafe. Be sure to use this product only if you have obtained it from a safe and reputable source.

In 1989, a life-threatening condition called eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome (EMS) occurred in many people using L-tryptophan and some died from the condition. All of these people had taken L-tryptophan distributed by a company in Japan. This L-tryptophan was found to contain trace levels of impure ingredients. Since that time, the FDA has limited the availability of L-tryptophan in the U.S. However, the increased use of the Internet has made many dietary supplements available from non-U.S. sources.

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Although there have been no published cases of EMS within the last several years, you should be aware of the symptoms. Stop using L-tryptophan and seek emergency medical help if you have signs of EMS:

severe muscle pain (most often in the shoulders, back, or legs);

weakness, numbness, tingling, or burning pain (especially at night);

tremors or twitching muscle movements;

swelling in any part of your body;

skin changes (dryness, yellowing, hardening, rash, hair loss);

breathing difficulty; or

Common side effects may include:

feeling drowsy or light-headed;

weakness, lack of coordination;

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also:

What other drugs will affect L-tryptophan?

Taking L-tryptophan with other drugs that make you sleepy can worsen this effect. Ask your doctor before taking L-tryptophan with a sleeping pill, narcotic pain medicine, muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety, depression, or seizures.

Do not take L-tryptophan without medical advice if you are using any of the following medications:

a cough medicine that contains dextromethorphan (Delsym, Robitussin DM, and others);

a narcotic medicine such as meperidine (Demerol) or pentazocine (Talwin); or

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with L-tryptophan, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this product guide.

See also:

Further information

  • Consult with a licensed healthcare professional before using any herbal/health supplement. Whether you are treated by a medical doctor or a practitioner trained in the use of natural medicines/supplements, make sure all your healthcare providers know about all of your medical conditions and treatments.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 3.01.

www.drugs.com

Emgality

Generic Name: galcanezumab (GAL ka NEZ ue mab)
Brand Names: Emgality

Medically reviewed by J. Stewart, BPharm Last updated on Jul 1, 2019.

What is Emgality?

Emgality is a prescription medicine used to prevent migraine headaches in adults.

Emgality is also used to treat cluster headache episodes in adults.

It is not known if Emgality is safe and effective in children.

Important Information

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Emgality if you are allergic to galcanezumab.

Emgality is not approved for use by anyone younger than 18 years old.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant. It is not known whether galcanezumab will harm an unborn baby. However, having migraine headaches during pregnancy may cause preeclampsia (dangerously high blood pressure that can lead to medical problems in both mother and baby). The benefit of preventing migraines may outweigh any risks to the baby.

It may not be safe to breast-feed while using galcanezumab. Ask your doctor about any risk.

How should I use Emgality?

Use Emgality exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets.

Emgality is injected under the skin. A healthcare provider may teach you how to properly use the medication by yourself.

For prevention of migraine headaches: Emgality is usually given as a first dose of 2 injections, followed by 1 injection once per month.

For treatment of a cluster headache episodes: Emgality is usually given as 3 injections at the start of the cluster period, followed by 1 injection once per month until the end of the cluster period.

Follow your doctor’s dosing instructions very carefully.

Read and carefully follow any Instructions for Use provided with your medicine. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you don’t understand all instructions.

Prepare an injection only when you are ready to give it. Do not use if the medicine looks cloudy, has changed colors, or has particles in it. Call your pharmacist for new medicine.

Avoid injecting into skin that is hard, red, bruised, or tender.

Store this medicine in its original carton in the refrigerator, protected from light. Do not freeze or shake the medicine.

You may briefly store Emgality at room temperature. Protect from light and use the medicine within 7 days. Do not put it back in the refrigerator.

Take a syringe or injection pen out of the refrigerator and let it reach room temperature for 30 minutes before injecting your dose. Do not warm the syringe with hot water, sunlight, or a microwave.

Each prefilled syringe or injection pen is for one use only. Throw it away after one use, even if there is still medicine left inside.

Emgality dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Migraine Prophylaxis:

Initial dose: 240 mg subcutaneously once
Maintenance dose: 120 mg subcutaneously monthly

Comments:
-The first dose is a loading dose consisting of 2 consecutive subcutaneous injections of 120 mg each.
-If a dose is missed, administer as soon as possible. Thereafter, dose can be scheduled from the date of the last dose.

Use: For the preventive treatment of migraine.

Usual Adult Dose for Cluster Headache:

Dose: 300 mg (three consecutive subcutaneous injections of 100 mg each) at the onset of the cluster period, and then monthly until the end of the cluster period.

See also:

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the medicine as soon as you remember, and then restart your regular injection schedule 1 month later. Do not use two doses at one time to make up a missed dose.

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What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while using Emgality?

Follow your doctor’s instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Emgality side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Emgality: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

An allergic reaction to galcanezumab can occur several days after an injection.

Common Emgality side effects may include:

pain, redness, itching, or irritation where the medicine was injected.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also:

What other drugs will affect Emgality?

Other drugs may interact with galcanezumab, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any medicine you start or stop using.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Emgality only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2020 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 2.01.

www.drugs.com

Ginger

Generic Name: ginger (JIN jer)
Brand Name: Ginger(obs), Hofels Ginger One A Day, Ginger Root

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Jul 24, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum

What is ginger?

Ginger is an herb also known as Amomum Zingiber, Ardraka, Black Ginger, Cochin Ginger, Gan Jiang, Gingembre, Ginger Essential Oil, Ginger Root, Imber, Jengibre, Jiang, Kankyo, Kanshokyo, Nagara, Race Ginger, Racine de Gingembre, Rhizoma Zingiberi, Zingiberis Recens, Sheng Jiang, Shoga, Shokyo, Shunthi, Srungavera, Sunth, Sunthi, Vishvabheshaja, and other names.

Ginger has been used in alternative medicine as a possibly effective aid in treating nausea and vomiting after surgery, dizziness, menstrual pain, arthritis, preventing morning sickness.

Ginger has also been used for weight loss and to prevent motion sickness and seasickness. However, research has shown that ginger may not be effective in treating these conditions.

Other uses not proven with research have included sudden respiratory failure, alcohol hangover, nausea and vomiting due to chemotherapy, upset stomach, high cholesterol, migraines, muscle pains after exercise, rheumatoid arthritis, trouble swallowing, loss of appetite, colds, and other conditions.

It is not certain whether ginger is effective in treating any medical condition. Medicinal use of this product has not been approved by the FDA. Ginger should not be used in place of medication prescribed for you by your doctor.

Ginger is often sold as an herbal supplement. There are no regulated manufacturing standards in place for many herbal compounds and some marketed supplements have been found to be contaminated with toxic metals or other drugs. Herbal/health supplements should be purchased from a reliable source to minimize the risk of contamination.

Ginger may also be used for purposes not listed in this product guide.

Important Information

Follow all directions on the product label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

Before using ginger, talk to your healthcare provider. You may not be able to use ginger if you have certain medical conditions.

Ask a doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider if it is safe for you to use this product if you have:

a bleeding or blood clotting disorder;

any heart conditions.

It is not known whether ginger will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this product without medical advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether ginger passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this product without medical advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Do not give any herbal/health supplement to a child without medical advice.

How should I take ginger?

When considering the use of herbal supplements, seek the advice of your doctor. You may also consider consulting a practitioner who is trained in the use of herbal/health supplements.

If you choose to use ginger, use it as directed on the package or as directed by your doctor, pharmacist, or other healthcare provider. Do not use more of this product than is recommended on the label.

Do not use different formulations of ginger (such as tablets, liquids, and others) at the same time, unless specifically directed to do so by a health care professional. Using different formulations together increases the risk of an overdose.

Call your doctor if the condition you are treating with ginger does not improve, or if it gets worse while using this product.

Ginger can affect blood-clotting and may increase your risk of bleeding.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra ginger to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking ginger?

Follow your healthcare provider’s instructions about any restrictions on food, beverages, or activity.

Avoid using ginger together with other herbal/health supplements that can also affect blood-clotting. This includes angelica (dong quai), capsicum, clove, danshen, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, horse chestnut, Panax ginseng, poplar, red clover, saw palmetto, turmeric, and willow.

Avoid using ginger together with other herbal/health supplements that can lower blood sugar, such as alpha-lipoic acid, chromium, devil’s claw, fenugreek, garlic, guar gum, horse chestnut, Panax ginseng, psyllium, Siberian ginseng, and others.

Ginger side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Although not all side effects are known, ginger is thought to be likely safe for most people.

Stop using ginger and call your healthcare provider at once if you have:

easy bruising or bleeding; or

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any bleeding that will not stop.

Common side effects may include:

heavier menstrual periods; and

skin irritation (if applied to skin).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also:

What other drugs will affect ginger?

Other drugs may interact with ginger, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Do not take ginger without medical advice if you are using any of the following medications:

Phenprocoumon (used in Europe to slow blood clotting);

any diabetes medication;

any medication for high blood pressure; or

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with ginger, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this product guide.

See also:

Further information

  • Consult with a licensed healthcare professional before using any herbal/health supplement. Whether you are treated by a medical doctor or a practitioner trained in the use of natural medicines/supplements, make sure all your healthcare providers know about all of your medical conditions and treatments.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 5.01.

www.drugs.com

Medications for Lymphoma

Other names: Cancer, Lymphoma

About Lymphoma: Lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system, which is part of the immune system. A lymphoma occurs when a developing white cell (lymphocyte) goes through an abnormal change and multiplies. The abnormal cells (lymphoma cells) can accumulate in various parts of the body, often in the lymph nodes. Lymphomas can be classified as Hodgkins’s lymphoma and the more common non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and these can be further classified into many different subtypes. Symptoms of lymphoma can include swelling of the lymph nodes, fever, night sweats and weight loss.

Drugs Used to Treat Lymphoma

The following list of medications are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of this condition.

prednisone

Generic name: prednisone systemic

Generic name: dexamethasone systemic

Brand names: Dexamethasone Intensol, Dexpak Taperpak, De-Sone LA, Dxevo, HiDex …show all

Generic name: doxorubicin systemic

Generic name: brentuximab systemic

Generic name: doxorubicin systemic

Brand name: Adriamycin

Generic name: chlorambucil systemic

Generic name: methotrexate systemic

Generic name: methotrexate systemic

Brand name: Trexall

Generic name: bortezomib systemic

Generic name: nelarabine systemic

Generic name: brentuximab systemic

Brand name: Adcetris

Generic name: dexamethasone systemic

Generic name: pralatrexate systemic

Generic name: lenalidomide systemic

Generic name: chlorambucil systemic

Brand name: Leukeran

Generic name: ibrutinib systemic

Generic name: lenalidomide systemic

Brand name: Revlimid

Generic name: vinblastine systemic

Generic name: ibrutinib systemic

Brand name: Imbruvica

Generic name: nelarabine systemic

Brand name: Arranon

Generic name: denileukin diftitox systemic

Generic name: bortezomib systemic

Brand name: Velcade

Generic name: dexamethasone systemic

Generic name: cortisone systemic

Generic name: idelalisib systemic

Topics under Lymphoma

  • Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (30 drugs)
  • Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (126 drugs in 15 topics)

Learn more about Lymphoma

IBM Watson Micromedex

Symptoms and treatments

Mayo Clinic Reference

ICD-10 CM Clinical Codes (External)

Legend

Drug name Rx / OTC Preg nancy CSA Alcohol Reviews Rating Popularity
Rx C N 2 reviews
Rx Prescription Only
OTC Over the Counter
Rx/OTC Prescription or Over the Counter
Off Label This medication may not be approved by the FDA for the treatment of this condition.
Pregnancy Category
A Adequate and well-controlled studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in the first trimester of pregnancy (and there is no evidence of risk in later trimesters).
B Animal reproduction studies have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women.
C Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use in pregnant women despite potential risks.
D There is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience or studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use in pregnant women despite potential risks.
X Studies in animals or humans have demonstrated fetal abnormalities and/or there is positive evidence of human fetal risk based on adverse reaction data from investigational or marketing experience, and the risks involved in use in pregnant women clearly outweigh potential benefits.
N FDA has not classified the drug.
Controlled Substances Act (CSA) Schedule
N Is not subject to the Controlled Substances Act.
1 Has a high potential for abuse. Has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. There is a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision.
2 Has a high potential for abuse. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States or a currently accepted medical use with severe restrictions. Abuse may lead to severe psychological or physical dependence.
3 Has a potential for abuse less than those in schedules 1 and 2. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse may lead to moderate or low physical dependence or high psychological dependence.
4 Has a low potential for abuse relative to those in schedule 3. It has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to those in schedule 3.
5 Has a low potential for abuse relative to those in schedule 4. Has a currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States. Abuse may lead to limited physical dependence or psychological dependence relative to those in schedule 4.
Alcohol
X Interacts with Alcohol.

Browse Treatment Options

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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