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Yuraks from bugs: the effectiveness of the drug according to customer reviews and instructions for the use of insecticide, recommendations for breeding

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Erectile Dysfunction: Medicines to Treat ED

In this Article

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In this Article

Some men with erectile dysfunction, or ED, find they can return to an active sex life by treating an underlying condition, such as high blood pressure, or with counseling and lifestyle changes. But others find they may need medication to get and keep an erection.

The FDA has approved several prescription drugs you take orally to treat ED.

What Medications Are Available?

All of these work by relaxing your muscles and boosting blood flow to your penis, making erections easier to get and maintain. They are:

Caution: Do not use these ED medications if you take nitrates, such as nitroglycerin or a similar medicine, for chest pain. The combination can cause dangerously low blood pressure.

Are There Differences in Them?

These medications all work similarly to each other. However, there are subtle differences in how long they stay effective and how quickly they begin to work.

Levitra takes about 30 minutes to start working and the effects last a little longer than Viagra, about 5 hours.

Staxyn dissolves in your mouth. It contains the same active ingredient as Levitra and can begin working in about 15 minutes.

Viagra takes around 30 minutes to become effective and lasts about 4 hours.

Cialis lasts much longer — up to 36 hours in some cases.

Stendra can start doing its thing in as little as 15 minutes, and its effects last up to 6 hours.

Can I Make a Switch?

Yes. You may find that one works better for your schedule or that there are differences in the side effects for you. But these medications work the same basic way, so you’re likely to have similar results.

What Precautions Should I Take?

Again, do not use these ED medications if you take nitrates, such as nitroglycerin or a similar medicine, for chest pain. But there are other situations that may make these medications unsafe as well. Before you take Viagra or one of the others, tell your doctor:

  • If you are allergic to any medications, including other ED medications
  • About any prescription or nonprescription medications you take, as well as any herbal and dietary supplements
  • If you are scheduled for surgery, even dental surgery
  • If you take alpha-blockers for blood pressure or prostate problems. These can lower your blood pressure when taken with ED pills.

Always follow the directions on your prescription label carefully. Also, make sure to ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain anything you don’t understand. Take these drugs exactly as directed.

Continued

Who Should Not Take These?

If you’ve had a heart attack, stroke, or life-threatening irregular heart rate within the past 6 months, you should discuss other options with your doctor.

You should also avoid these medications if you have uncontrolled high or low blood pressure or if you get chest pain while having sex.

Any Side Effects?

Side effects are not common, but they can happen. You may get:

• A headache
• Upset stomach or heartburn
• Feeling of warmth
• Nasal congestion
• Changes in vision (lights tinged with color, glare)

Warnings

You may need emergency treatment if you get an erection that lasts for more than 4 hours and happens without any sexual excitement. You may hear a doctor call it a “priapism.” Blood becomes trapped in the penis and can’t flow back out. It can lead to scarring and permanent ED if not treated.

Also get emergency treatment with any of the following:

If you’re having chest pain and have taken Viagra in the past 24 hours or Cialis in the past 48 hours, don’t take nitroglycerin. Call for an EMS and make sure you or someone with you tells them which ED medicine you took.

Vision Problems

You should also stop these medications and call your doctor right away if you have vision loss.

A rare vision problem called NAION — short for “nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy” — has been reported by a few men using these drugs.

The condition causes a sudden loss of eyesight because blood flow is blocked to the optic nerve. People who have a higher chance for NAION include those who:

How Should I Store Them?

Keep them in their original container and out of reach of children. Store them away from heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). When they expire or you don’t need them anymore, get rid of them.

Sources

National Health Services. UK. “Erectile dysfunction (impotence) – Treatment.”

NIH. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, “What causes erectile dysfunction?” “Prescribing Erectile Dysfunction Medications.”

www.webmd.com

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

When you buy soaps and body washes, do you reach for products labeled “antibacterial” hoping they’ll keep your family safer? Do you think those products will lower your risk of getting sick, spreading germs or being infected?

According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), there isn’t enough science to show that over-the-counter (OTC) antibacterial soaps are better at preventing illness than washing with plain soap and water. To date, the benefits of using antibacterial hand soap haven’t been proven. In addition, the wide use of these products over a long time has raised the question of potential negative effects on your health.

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After studying the issue, including reviewing available literature and hosting public meetings, in 2013 the FDA issued a proposed rule requiring safety and efficacy data from manufacturers, consumers, and others if they wanted to continue marketing antibacterial products containing those ingredients, but very little information has been provided. That’s why the FDA is issuing a final rule under which OTC consumer antiseptic wash products (including liquid, foam, gel hand soaps, bar soaps, and body washes) containing the majority of the antibacterial active ingredients—including triclosan and triclocarban—will no longer be able to be marketed.

Why? Because the manufacturers haven’t proven that those ingredients are safe for daily use over a long period of time. Also, manufacturers haven’t shown that these ingredients are any more effective than plain soap and water in preventing illnesses and the spread of certain infections. Some manufacturers have already started removing these ingredients from their products, ahead of the FDA’s final rule.

“Following simple handwashing practices is one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of many types of infection and illness at home, at school and elsewhere,” says Theresa M. Michele, MD, of the FDA’s Division of Nonprescription Drug Products. “We can’t advise this enough. It’s simple, and it works.”

The FDA’s final rule covers only consumer antibacterial soaps and body washes that are used with water. It does not apply to hand sanitizers or hand wipes. It also does not apply to antibacterial soaps that are used in health care settings, such as hospitals and nursing homes.

What Makes Soap ‘Antibacterial’

Antibacterial soaps (sometimes called antimicrobial or antiseptic soaps) contain certain chemicals not found in plain soaps. Those ingredients are added to many consumer products with the intent of reducing or preventing bacterial infection.

Many liquid soaps labeled antibacterial contain triclosan, an ingredient of concern to many environmental, academic and regulatory groups. Animal studies have shown that triclosan alters the way some hormones work in the body and raises potential concerns for the effects of use in humans. We don’t yet know how triclosan affects humans and more research is needed.

“There’s no data demonstrating that these drugs provide additional protection from diseases and infections. Using these products might give people a false sense of security,” Michele says. “If you use these products because you think they protect you more than soap and water, that’s not correct. If you use them because of how they feel, there are many other products that have similar formulations but won’t expose your family to unnecessary chemicals. And some manufacturers have begun to revise these products to remove these ingredients.”

How do you tell if a product is antibacterial? For OTC drugs, antibacterial products generally have the word “antibacterial” on the label. Also, a Drug Facts label on a soap or body wash is a sign a product contains antibacterial ingredients.

Triclosan and Health Concerns

Triclosan can be found in many places today. It has been added to many consumer products—including clothing, kitchenware, furniture, and toys—to prevent bacterial contamination. Because of that, people’s long-term exposure to triclosan is higher than previously thought, raising concerns about the potential risks associated with the use of this ingredient over a lifetime.

In addition, laboratory studies have raised the possibility that triclosan contributes to making bacteria resistant to antibiotics. Some data shows this resistance may have a significant impact on the effectiveness of medical treatments, such as antibiotics.

The FDA and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been closely collaborating on scientific and regulatory issues related to triclosan. This joint effort will help to ensure government-wide consistency in the regulation of this chemical. The two agencies are reviewing the effects of triclosan from two different perspectives.

The EPA regulates the use of triclosan as a pesticide, and is in the process of updating its assessment of the effects of triclosan when it is used in pesticides. The FDA’s focus is on the effects of triclosan when it is used by consumers on a regular basis in hand soaps and body washes. By sharing information, the two agencies will be better able to measure the exposure and effects of triclosan and how these differing uses of triclosan may affect human health.

The EPA reevaluates each pesticide active ingredient every 15 years. The EPA’s Final Work Plan for the triclosan risk assessment can be found in docket EPA-HQ-OPP-2012-0811.

More on the FDA’s Rule

The FDA’s rule doesn’t yet apply to three chemicals (benzalkonium chloride, benzethonium chloride and chloroxylenol). Manufacturers are developing and planning to submit new safety and effectiveness data for these ingredients.

With the exception of those three ingredients that are still under study, all products that use the other 19 active ingredients will need to change their formulas or they will no longer be available to consumers. Manufacturers will have one year to comply with the rule.

This rule doesn’t apply to hand sanitizers. The FDA recently issued a final rule on OTC hand sanitizers and will continue to review the three active ingredients commonly used in hand sanitizers. To learn about the difference between consumer hand sanitizers and consumer antibacterial soaps, visit our consumer information page.

Consumers, Keep Washing with Plain Soap and Water

So what should consumers do? Wash your hands with plain soap and water. That’s still one of the most important steps you can take to avoid getting sick and to prevent spreading germs.

www.fda.gov

PAS2JS Transporter from Pascal to JavaScript: Delphi incompatibilities and workarounds

Nowadays, in the pocket of an ordinary person lies a powerful personal computer, which 10-20 years ago could only be dreamed of. And if you have kilometers of debugged Windows code and perfectly working applications and utilities written in Delphi, you probably would like to use this wealth for mobile development. As well as the experience gained during programming under Windows. PAS2JS helps you to combine two worlds: development for Windows and the creation of Web applications and Node.js modules.

Some of the difficulties found from personal experience are discussed in this article.

Why not just learn JavaScript and write Web applications on it?

I learned the javascript language sufficiently. But first, programming for the Web is more than just language skills. Secondly, the ability to write one code for different platforms is priceless. You can debug application modules in Delphi IDE, using its powerful debugger and editor, and then, adding the necessary binding, get a ready-made working application for the site. And when you correct the error or add new functionality to the application for Windows, it will be enough just to recompile the JavaScript modules in PAS2JS .

It should be noted that while PAS2JS does not support all the features of the Delphi language, they are listed on the site . Also, some fragments of seemingly simple PAS2JS code cannot transpose into JavaScript.

Translation difficulties

So, the new PAS2JS package is downloaded from FTP , we try to recompile a simple “Hello world”, and immediately stop at:

Error: can’t find unit «System.SysUtils»

Ready-made PAS2JS packages, which can be found in the packages folder, partially duplicate Delphi system units. But they do not have a prefix in the name. The solution is simple: we delete the prefix “System.” From the name of the unit. A program in Delphi is compiled (if not, check the presence of the “System” prefix in the Unit Scope Names, in the Delphi Project | Options | Delphi Compiler menu).

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Type reduction in constants

PAS2JS does not support type conversion in constant expressions:

Error: Constant expression expected

In the case of enumerated types, you can try to change it, so it passes:

Also, PAS2JS does not understand the built-in functions of the Lo and Hi languages. In the definition of constants, they can be replaced as follows:

ANSI characters and strings

I hope you have already switched to Unicode strings in your Delphi projects? If you have left part of the strings in ANSI format in order to save memory, they will not be converted to JavaScript: PAS2JS does not know the types AnsiChar, AnsiString, Utf8String and RawByteString. Consider replacing them with Unicode types, or Byte and Array of Byte.

Here is an example of replacing AnsiChar with Byte:

Awkward letter ó

As a curiosity: in Polish there is the letter ó — O kreskowane, Unicode # $ 00F3. For some reason, PAS2JS disliked it, and in some cases can not perceive the line if this letter is included in it:

Case operator

A sudden surprise came up in the case statement, in which PAS2JS refused to accept Russian letters as options:

The definition of constants for the desired Russian letters helped:

findings

I managed to compile a small Delphi project for the Web, making relatively small changes to the source code of the program, and for the time saved I wrote this article. Testing has shown that both versions of the program: for Windows and for the Web, work in exactly the same way. This is undoubtedly a success: now I can develop this project, modifying the program in Delphi, and transpiling it into JavaScript using PAS2JS.

As for the minor shortcomings revealed, I am sure they will be quickly eliminated. Since the project PAS2JS — open and free, actively developed by the community Free Pascal .

quick-geek.github.io

Estrumate

Estrumate

250 mcg cloprostenol/mL (equivalent to 263 mcg cloprostenol sodium/mL)

A sterile solution of a prostaglandin F2α analogue for intramuscular injection in beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

Caution: Federal (USA) law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian.

Description

Estrumate ® (cloprostenol injection) is a synthetic prostaglandin analogue structurally related to prostaglandin F2 α (PGF2 α). Each mL of the sterile colorless aqueous solution contains 250 mcg cloprostenol (equivalent to 263 mcg cloprostenol sodium), 6.1 mg sodium citrate, 0.56 mg anhydrous citric acid, 6.7 mg sodium chloride, 20mg benzyl alcohol, and water for injection, q.s.

INDICATIONS FOR USE:

1. For unobserved or non-detected estrus in beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

2. For treatment of pyometra or chronic endometritis in beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

3. For treatment of mummified fetus in beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

4. For treatment of luteal cysts in beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

5. For abortion of beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

6. For estrus synchronization in beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

7. For use with Fertagyl ® (gonadorelin) to synchronize estrous cycles to allow for fixed time artificial insemination (FTAI) in lactating dairy cows.

Estrumate causes functional and morphological regression of the corpus luteum (luteolysis) in cattle. In normal, non-pregnant cycling animals, this effect on the life span of the corpus luteum usually results in estrus 2 to 5 days after treatment. In animals with prolonged luteal function (pyometra, mummified fetus, and luteal cysts), the induced luteolysis usually results in resolution of the condition and return to cyclicity. Pregnant animals may abort depending on the stage of gestation.

Dosage and Administration

Two mL of Estrumate (500 mcg cloprostenol) should be administered by INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTION using the specific dosage regimen for the indication.

20 mL bottle size: Use within 28 days of first puncture.

100 mL bottle size: Use within 28 days of first puncture and puncture a maximum of 12 times. Use only with automatic injection equipment or repeater syringe. Discard bottle after one stopper puncture with draw-off spike.

1. For unobserved or non-detected estrus in beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

Cows and heifers which are not detected in estrus, although ovarian cyclicity continues, can be treated with Estrumate if a mature corpus luteum is present. Estrus is expected to occur 2 to 5 days following injection, at which time animals may be inseminated. Treated cattle should be inseminated at the usual time following detection of estrus. If estrous detection is not desirable or possible, treated animals may be inseminated twice at about 72 and 96 hours post-injection.

2. For treatment of pyometra or chronic endometritis in beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

Damage to the reproductive tract at calving or postpartum retention of the placenta often leads to infection and inflammation of the uterus (endometritis). Under certain circumstances, this may progress into chronic endometritis with the uterus becoming distended with purulent matter. This condition, commonly referred to as pyometra, is characterized by a lack of cyclical estrous behavior and the presence of a persistent corpus luteum. Induction of luteolysis with Estrumate usually results in evacuation of the uterus and a return to normal cyclical activity within 14 days after treatment. After 14 days post-treatment, recovery rate of treated animals will not be different than that of untreated cattle.

3. For treatment of mummified fetus in beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

Death of the conceptus during gestation may be followed by its degeneration and dehydration. Induction of luteolysis with Estrumate usually results in expulsion of the mummified fetus from the uterus. (Manual assistance may be necessary to remove the fetus from the vagina). Normal cyclical activity usually follows.

4. For treatment of luteal cysts in beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

A cow or heifer may be noncyclic due to the presence of a luteal cyst (a single, anovulatory follicle with a thickened wall which is accompanied by no external signs and by no changes in palpable consistency of the uterus). Treatment with Estrumate can restore normal ovarian activity by causing regression of the luteal cyst.

5. For abortion of beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

Unwanted pregnancies can be safely and efficiently terminated from 1 week after mating until about 5 months of gestation. The induced abortion is normally uncomplicated and the fetus and placenta are usually expelled about 4 to 5 days after the injection with the reproductive tract returning to normal soon after the abortion. The ability of Estrumate to induce abortion decreases beyond the fifth month of gestation while the risk of dystocia and its consequences increases. Estrumate has not been sufficiently tested under feedlot conditions; therefore, recommendations cannot be made for its use in heifers placed in feedlots.

6. For estrus synchronization in beef cows, lactating dairy cows, and replacement beef and dairy heifers

The luteolytic action of Estrumate can be utilized to schedule estrus and ovulation for an individual cycling animal or a group of animals. This allows control of the time at which cycling cows or heifers can be bred. Estrumate can be used in a breeding program with the following methods:

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• Single Estrumate injection: Only animals with a mature corpus luteum should be treated to obtain maximum response to the single injection. However, not all cycling cattle should be treated since a mature corpus luteum is present for only 11 to 12 days of the 21-day cycle. Prior to treatment, cattle should be examined rectally and found to be anatomically normal, be non-pregnant, and have a mature corpus luteum. If these criteria are met, estrus is expected to occur 2 to 5 days following injection, at which time animals may be inseminated. Treated cattle should be inseminated at the usual time following detection of estrus. If estrous detection is not desirable or possible, treated animals may be inseminated either once at about 72 hours or twice at about 72 and 96 hours post- injection. With a single injection program, it may be desirable to assess the cyclicity status of the herd before Estrumate treatment. This can be accomplished by heat detecting and breeding at the usual time following detection of estrus for a 6-day period, all prior to injection. If by the sixth day the cyclicity status appears normal (approximately 25%-30% detected in estrus), all cattle not already inseminated should be palpated for normality, non-pregnancy, and cyclicity, then injected with Estrumate. Breeding should then be continued at the usual time following signs of estrus on the seventh and eighth days. On the ninth and tenth days, breeding may continue at the usual time following detection of estrus, or all cattle not already inseminated may be bred either once on the ninth day (at about 72 hours post-injection) or on both the ninth and tenth days (at about 72 and 96 hours post-injection).

• Double Estrumate injections: prior to treatment, cattle should be examined rectally and found to be anatomically normal, non-pregnant, and cycling (the presence of a mature corpus luteum is not necessary when the first injection of a double injection regimen is given). A second injection should be given 11 days after the first injection. In normal, cycling cattle, estrus is expected 2 to 5 days following the second injection. Treated cattle should be inseminated at the usual time following detection of estrus. If estrous detection is not desirable or possible, treated animals may be inseminated either once at about 72 hours or twice at about 72 and 96 hours following the second Estrumate injection. Many animals will come into estrus following the first injection; these animals can be inseminated at the usual time following detected estrus. Animals not inseminated should receive a second injection 11 days after the first injection. Animals receiving both injections may be inseminated at the usual time following detection of estrus or may be inseminated either once at about 72 hours or twice at about 72 and 96 hours post second injection.

Any breeding program recommended should be completed by either:

• observing animals (especially during the third week after injection) and inseminating or hand mating any animals returning to estrus,

• turning in clean-up bull(s) 5 to 7 days after the last injection of Estrumate to cover any animals returning to estrus.

Management considerations for use of Estrumate for estrus synchronization:

A variety of programs can be designed to best meet the needs of individual management systems. A breeding program should be selected which is appropriate for the existing circumstances and management practices. Before a breeding program is planned, the producer’s objectives must be examined and the producer must be made aware of the projected results and limitations. The producer and the consulting veterinarian should review the operation’s breeding history, herd health, and nutritional status and agree that a breeding program is practical in the producer’s specific situation. For any successful breeding program:

• cows and heifers must be normal, non-pregnant, and cycling (rectal palpation should be performed);

• cows and heifers must be in sound breeding condition and on an adequate or increasing plane of nutrition;

• proper program planning and record keeping are essential;

• if artificial insemination is used, it must be performed by competent inseminators using high-quality semen.

It is important to understand that Estrumate is effective only in animals with a mature corpus luteum (ovulation must have occurred at least 5 days prior to treatment). This must be considered when breeding is intended following a single Estrumate injection.

There is no difference in the fertility achieved following the single or double dosage regimen when breeding occurs at induced estrus, or at 72 and 96 hours post-treatment. Conception rates may be lower than expected in those fixed time breeding programs employing Estrumate alone which omit the second insemination (ie, the insemination at or near 96 hours). This is especially true if a fixed time insemination is used following a single Estrumate injection.

7. For use with Fertagyl ® (gonadorelin) to synchronize estrous cycles to allow for fixed time artificial insemination (FTAI) in lactating dairy cows

Use in reproductive synchrony programs similar to the following:

• Administer the first Fertagyl ® injection (2 mL; 86 mcg gonadorelin, as gonadorelin acetate) by intramuscular injection on Day 0.

• Administer 2 mL of Estrumate by intramuscular injection 6 to 8 days after the first Fertagyl ® injection.

• Administer the second Fertagyl ® injection (2 mL; 86 mcg gonadorelin, as gonadorelin acetate) 30 to 72 hours after the Estrumate injection.

• Perform FTAI 8 to 24 hours after the second Fertagyl ® injection, or inseminate cows on detected estrus using standard herd practices.

Contraindications

Do not use this drug product in pregnant cattle, unless abortion is desired.

WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS:

WITHDRAWAL PERIODS AND RESIDUE WARNINGS:

No milk discard or pre-slaughter drug withdrawal period is required when used according to labeling. Use of this product in excess of the approved dose may result in drug residues.

USER SAFETY WARNINGS: Not for use in humans. Keep this and all drugs out of the reach of children.

Women of childbearing age, asthmatics, and persons with bronchial and other respiratory problems should exercise extreme caution when handling this product.

Estrumate is readily absorbed through the skin and can cause abortion and/or bronchospasms. Direct contact with the skin should therefore be avoided. Accidental spillage on the skin should be washed off immediately with soap and water.

To obtain a copy of the Safety Data Sheet (SDS) or for technical assistance, contact Merck Animal Health at 1-800-211-3573 or http://www.merck.com

ANIMAL SAFETY WARNINGS:

As with all parenteral products, careful aseptic techniques should be employed to decrease the possibility of post-injection bacterial infection. Severe localized clostridial infections associated with injection of Estrumate have been reported. In rare instances, such infections have resulted in death. Aggressive antibiotic therapy should be employed at the first sign of infection at the injection site, whether localized or diffuse.

At 50 and 100 times the recommended dose, mild side effects may be detected in some cattle. These include increased uneasiness, slight frothing, and milk let-down.

To report suspected adverse drug experiences, call Merck Animal Health at 1-800-211-3573. For additional information about adverse drug experience reporting for animal drugs, contact FDA at 1-888-FDA-VETS or at http://www.fda.gov/reportanimalae

How Supplied

20 mL and 100 mL multidose vials

STORAGE, HANDLING, AND DISPOSAL:

1. Protect from light.

2. Store in container.

3. Store at 2-30°C (36-86°F).

See FDA’s website http://www.fda.gov/safesharpsdisposal for information on safe disposal of needles and other sharps.

Approved by FDA under NADA # 113-645

Copyright © 2017 Intervet Inc (d/b/a Merck Animal Health) a subsidiary of Merck & Co., Inc. Madison, NJ 07940 All rights reserved.

www.drugs.com

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