Horsefly bite treatment: Three NHS-recommended ways to calm swelling in the affected area

Horsefly bite treatment: Three ways to soothe the wound recommended by the NHS

Contents

HORSEFLY bites can be sudden and painful, often resulting in bleeding from the body. The NHS recommends these three methods for treating insect bites, including those caused by horseflies.

Horsefly bite treatment aims to soothe pain in the damaged area.

Following a bite, sufferers tend to experience pain, itching and/or swelling.

“A bite from a horsefly can be very painful and the bitten area of skin usually be red and raised,” said the NHS online.

This needs to be treated quickly both to reduce the discomfort and to avoid an infection.

Try these three NHS-recommended methods for treating insect bites to soothe a horsefly-inflicted wound.

Related articles

Horsefly bite treatment: Three NHS-recommended ways to calm swelling in the affected area

For a painful bite

If this happens, the NHS said sufferers should use over-the-counter painkillers to relieve the discomfort.

Paracetamol and ibuprofen are possibilities. However, aspirin should be avoided if the affected person is below 16 years old.

It is possible to save money buying painkillers by only buying certain brands.

For an itchy bite

Should an insect-inflicted wound become irritable and need scratching, the NHS advised applying a cream or lotion.

“Ask your pharmacist about over-the-counter treatments, including crotamiton cream or lotion, hydrocortisone cream or ointment and antihistamine tablets,” they said online.

Horsefly bite treatment: You should aim to treat a bite quickly to help avoid infection (Image: Getty)

Tips for living with a skin condition

Nine things you should know about coping with skin conditions.

Resist the itch — Eczema is almost always itchy no matter where it occurs on the body and although it may be tempting to scratch affected areas of the skin, this should be avoided as much as possible

Horsefly bite treatment: Applying cream to affected areas can reduce itches related to bites (Image: Getty)

For a swelling

If the bite has begun to swell, it may be necessary to apply a cold compress or ice pack.

This causes the blood vessels to get smaller, reducing swelling as fewer blood cells can rush to the area.

In addition, the NHS said taking “antihistamine tablets” could also help calm the swelling.

Healthline, a US-based medical website, gave direct advice on how to treat horsefly bites.

“You should cleanse the bite and apply over-the-counter antiseptic spray or ointment to help keep the wound clean and decrease irritation and itchiness,” they warned.

Horsefly bite treatment: Follow these three steps to help treat swelling, itchiness or pain (Image: getty)

“Be sure to watch the area for signs of an infection, such as excessive pus or a foul odour. If you have any unusual symptoms you should consult your doctor.”

These bites heal in a few days “in most cases” the website advised.

“Certain insect bites can cause more serious reactions.

“If you have difficulty breathing, a rash that spreads or worsening pain, you should seek medical attention,” they continued.

www.express.co.uk

What to do if you’re bitten by a horsefly this summer

They are bigger than normal flies and can give you a very nasty bite

It’s the time of year when we are all spending more time outside.

And while it’s lovely to enjoy summer weather in the garden or the park, there is one major downside — insect bites.

But it’s not just midges and mosquitoes that are thirsty for blood.

Horseflies, which look like regular houseflies, can give you a bite which is much more painful than many others.

Unlike midge bites, it can take much longer to recover from a horsefly bite because they cut into the skin making it more likely to become infected.

Some people can also suffer extreme allergic reactions to horsefly bites.

What are horseflies?

They’re large, dark-coloured flies which are around 1cm-2.5cm in size. They’re generally found near to cattle, horse stables, ponds, pools, woodlands, and grassy areas.

Don’t read too much into their name — ‘horseflies’ — because they’ll quite happily chomp on any large warm-blooded mammal, including people.

Read More
Related Articles

Only females bite because they need blood to produce eggs. They have jagged, saw-like teeth which slice open skin, then they release an anti-coagulant to stop the blood from clotting while they enjoy their meal.

How do I know if I’ve been bitten by a horsefly?

First off, you’ll know about it pretty quickly. The bites are painful and itchy.

Horsefly bites develop into large, red, itchy, swollen bumps within minutes. For most people they’re completely harmless, but they’re extremely uncomfortable.

Some people also report feeling hot, weak, nauseous or dizzy.

See also:  Why Flying Termites Mean Serious Trouble

An infected bite can result in redness, oozing, and extreme pain. Visit your GP if you’re suffering from an infection.

Read More
Related Articles

In exceptional cases some people can suffer an allergic reaction with symptoms including dizziness, wheezing, difficulty breathing, a blotchy skin rash and severe swelling that may be visible in your lips or tongue.

If you suffer any of these reactions, seek medical help immediately.

What should I do if one bites me?

It’s important to keep the bite clean because if bacteria gets into the skin it can become infected. In very rare cases it can cause cellulitis, an infection of the soft tissues. It’s best to clean the wound with an antiseptic soap and warm water.

Apply an ice pack to help sooth the area and stop the itching.

Doctors normally recommend using an over-the-counter steroid cream containing hydrocortisone. Ibuprofen gel can also help ease any pain and swelling.

And it goes without saying that you should avoid scratching the bite. It won’t stop the itching and could damage the skin, increasing the risk of developing an infection.

www.hulldailymail.co.uk

Bitten by a horsefly? What to do and how to treat it

While horseflies look like regular flies their bites are bigger and more painful

  • 05:00, 27 JUL 2018
  • Updated 12:08, 27 JUL 2018

While summer may have hit the region it appears it could well have brought along a new batch of bitey insects to plaque us when we’re outside.

Wasps, bees, and midges might seem bad enough but it seems the horsefly, known as clegs, are the latest trying to leave us with nasty bite marks.

And it is even more important to make sure you know what to do if you’re bitten as experts warn you have to avoid the bites becoming infected.

According to the Manchester Evening News some people can suffer extreme allergic reactions to horsefly bites.

What are horseflies?

They’re large, dark-coloured flies which are around 1cm-2.5cm in size. They’re generally found near to cattle, horse stables, ponds, pools, woodlands, and grassy areas, hence the name.

The flies aren’t just into horses though, they’ll happily snack on any large warm-blooded mammal, including humans.

Read More
Related Articles

Only females bite because they need blood to produce eggs. They have jagged, saw-like teeth which slice open skin, then they release an anti-coagulant to stop the blood from clotting while they enjoy their meal.

How do I know if I’ve been bitten by a horsefly?

If you’re a little squeamish you might not want to see what a typical bite looks like, but there is a photo in the article below if you’re curious or worried.

First off, you’ll know about it pretty quickly. The bites are painful and itchy.

Horsefly bites develop into large, red, itchy, swollen bumps within minutes. For most people they’re completely harmless, but they’re extremely uncomfortable.

Some people also report feeling hot, weak and nauseous.

An infected bite can result in redness, oozing, and extreme pain. Visit your GP if you’re suffering from an infection.

In exceptional cases some people can suffer an allergic reaction with symptoms including dizziness, wheezing, difficulty breathing, a blotchy skin rash and severe swelling that may be visible in your lips or tongue.

If you suffer any of these reactions, seek medical help immediately.

What should I do if I am bitten?

It’s important to keep the bite clean because if bacteria gets into the skin it can become infected. In very rare cases it can cause cellulitis, an infection of the soft tissues. It’s best to clean the wound with an antiseptic soap and warm water.

Apply an ice pack to help soothe the area and stop the itching.

Read More
Related Articles

Doctors normally recommend using an over-the-counter steroid cream containing hydrocortisone. Ibuprofen gel can also help ease any pain and swelling.

And it goes without saying that you should avoid scratching the bite. It won’t stop the itching and could damage the skin, increasing the risk of developing an infection.

www.stokesentinel.co.uk

What to do if you get bitten by a horsefly this summer

They can give you a very nasty bite and thrive in the warmer weather

  • 10:20, 25 JUL 2017
  • Updated 17:01, 25 JUL 2017

There’s now another large insect that could be invading our homes this summer.

Forget flying ants, there’s a biting creature that thrives in the warmer weather.

Horseflies, also known as clegs, have sharp jaws and can cause a very painful bite.

Unlike midge bites, it can take much longer to recover from a horsefly bite because they cut into the skin rather than pierce it, which can cause the wound to become infected.

Some people can also suffer extreme allergic reactions to horsefly bites.

Read More
Related Articles

So what are horseflies?

These are large, dark-coloured flies which are around 1cm-2.5cm in size. They are generally found near to cattle, horse stables, ponds, pools, woodlands, and grassy areas.

Only females bite because they need blood to produce eggs. They have jagged teeth which slice open skin and release an anti-coagulant to stop the blood from clotting.

Read More
Related Articles

How do I know if I’ve been bitten by a horsefly?

First off, you’ll know about it pretty quickly. The bites are painful and itchy.

Horsefly bites develop into large, red, itchy, swollen bumps within minutes. For most people they’re completely harmless, but they’re extremely uncomfortable.

Some people also report feeling hot, weak, nauseous or dizzy.

An infected bite can result in redness, oozing, and extreme pain. Visit your GP if you’re suffering from an infection.

In exceptional cases some people can suffer an allergic reaction with symptoms including dizziness, wheezing, difficulty breathing, a blotchy skin rash and severe swelling that may be visible in your lips or tongue.

If you suffer any of these reactions, seek medical help immediately.

What can I do to avoid them?

These flies are not especially affected by insect repellent and the best way to stop from being bitten is covering up and keeping windows closed.

What should I do if one bites me?

It’s important to keep the bite clean because if bacteria gets into the skin it can become infected. In very rare cases it can cause cellulitis, an infection of the soft tissues. It’s best to clean the wound with an antiseptic soap and warm water.

Apply an ice pack to help sooth the area and stop the itching.

See also:  How to Kill Bugs in a Wall, Hunker

Doctors normally recommend using an over-the-counter steroid cream containing hydrocortisone. Ibuprofen gel can also help ease any pain and swelling, the Manchester Evening News reports.

And it goes without saying that you should avoid scratching the bite. It won’t stop the itching and could damage the skin, increasing the risk of developing an infection.

www.walesonline.co.uk

How to recognise a horsefly bite and what to do if you get bitten

It is important to make sure they don’t become infected

  • 14:27, 28 JUN 2018
  • Updated 11:50, 28 JUN 2019

With the sun out and the temperature soaring in parts of Wales it’s no surprise that people are taking the opportunity to spend a few hours working on their tans in their gardens or enjoying a day out at the beach.

But the problem with that, for some, might be the possibility of getting bitten or attacked by some form of insect.

Bees, wasps, midges — we’re seeing plenty of those around at the moment and they can make it tricky just to sit outside — never mind dining al fresco or having a barbecue.

And one insect you don’t want to get bitten by is the horsefly.

According to Chronicle Live, the Northumberland Wildlife Trust says you’ll find horseflies between May and September — which means we’re right at the peak of horsefly season.

So, what are horseflies, why do they bite and what should you do if you get bitten? We take a look.

What are horseflies and where do you find them?

Horseflies, also commonly known as clegs, have razor sharp jaws and can inflict a very painful bite.

They are large, dark-coloured flies measuring between 1cm to 2.5cm. As their name suggests, they like to feed off horses, so you’ll find clusters of them near stables and grazing fields. Cows are another favourite source of blood for horseflies, although any large mammal will do them — including humans and dogs.

You’ll also find horseflies around water pools, woodlands, meadows and grassy fields. Anywhere it’s nice to spend a sunny day, really.

Why do they bite?

The female flies need to feed off blood so they can produce eggs. Their jagged teeth slice open skin, while the flies also release an anti-coagulant to stop the blood from clotting while they eat.

The male flies feed off nectar.

Read More

How the heatwave hit Wales

How do I know If I’ve been bitten by a horsefly?

According to NHS Choices, a bite from a horsefly can be very painful and the bitten area of skin will usually be red and raised.

You may also experience:

  • a larger red, raised rash (called hives or urticaria)
  • dizziness
  • weakness
  • wheezing
  • part of your body becoming puffy and swollen

Horsefly bites can take a while to heal and can become infected. This is because, unlike midge bites, they cut into the skin rather than pierce it — which can cause the wound to become infected.

What should I do if I get bitten?

Keep the wound clean with antiseptic soap and warm water to avoid it becoming infected. Other than that, you won’t usually have to do anything.

However, if you do show symptoms of an infection, such as such as pus or increasing pain, redness and swelling, then contact your GP.

In rare cases, some people suffer allergic reactions. Symptoms include dizziness, wheezing, difficulty breathing, a blotchy skin rash and severe swelling that may be visible in your lips or tongue. If this happens to you, seek immediate medical help.

And avoid scratching the bite. It won’t stop the itching and can increase the likelihood of an infection.

www.walesonline.co.uk

Here’s what to do if you get bitten by a horsefly

If you’re out in the Derbyshire countryside it’s worth knowing the risks

  • 09:39, 27 JUN 2018
  • Updated 14:42, 29 JUN 2018

Rambling in the Derbyshire countryside is a wonderful way to spend a sunny day but the experience can be spoilt by horseflies.

These belligerent winged beasts can give you very painful bites.

You will know about it if you have been bitten because these critters cut into their victims’ skin in order to drink their blood.

There is likely to be an unpleasant and painful itchy red swelling around the incision.

They emerge from their pupal stage in late spring and early summer — so they are warmed up and ready to rumble right now as we enter the school summer holidays.

To help ramblers, trail runners, picnickers, cyclists and other tourists planning to enjoy the countryside during the holidays, we’ve rounded up the information you need to know about horse flies.

What are horseflies?

One of the larger fly species, horseflies are known for their painful bite.

They are large, dark-coloured, and around 1cm-1.2cm in size, and can be found near cattle, horse stables, ponds and other grassy areas.

Depending on the species, the flies will be in one of their larval stages over the winter.

Then, they enjoy a pupal stage for one to three weeks before emerging in late spring/early summer.

Read More
Related Articles

How do I avoid them?

Horse flies are tough cookies and are not overly repelled by insect repellent, so the best way to avoid being bitten is to cover exposed skin and keep windows closed similar to the way you might on those days when flying ants take to the sky.

However, this rather defeats the entire purpose of summer. Of course, what cannot be cured must be endured, so it is better to be informed and prepared rather than staying indoors trembling in fear.

What are bites like?

A horse-fly bite cuts the skin rather than pierces it like a mosquito, so they are painful and take longer to heal than other insect bites. They can easily become infected so, if you get bitten, make sure you keep the area of skin clean, try not to scratch and use antiseptic. There will probably be red skin and swelling. Antihistamines may help.

What’s the worst that can happen?

Serious reactions to horse-fly bites are not common but it might be useful to recognise the following symptoms:

  • Feeling dizzy and weak
  • Wheezing
  • Temporarily swollen skin, for example around the eye and lips
Read More
Related Articles

More severe allergic reactions to bites are rare but do constitute a medical emergency. People should call for an ambulance if they notice signs of anaphylaxis, including:

  • Serious swelling, itching or a rash
  • Face, lips, hands and feet are most likely to swell
  • Tongue and throat swelling are dangerous symptoms
  • Nausea, vomiting or diarrhoea
  • Feeling very unwell
  • Difficulty swallowing or breathing
See also:  Wasp: Yellow Jacket Insect Facts

Read More

More hot weather stories

What should you do if you are bitten?

Keeping the bite clean is important after being bitten by a horsefly, as the skin can become infected if bacteria gets in.

You can do this by cleaning the wound with an antiseptic soap, and warm water.

If the bite is itching, you can apply an ice pack to help soothe the area.

And as with any bite — no scratching!

You could also apply an over-the-counter steroid cream that contains hydrocortisone to stop the swelling.

Read More
Related Articles

We’ve launched our very own app for Android and Apple devices which can be tailored to deliver the news and sport that you’re interested in.

To download the Android app click here .

www.derbytelegraph.co.uk

Horsefly bites: What to do if you get bitten this summer

It’s horsefly season – here’s 20 things you should know about the nasty flying and bloodsucking critters.

They might be called horseflies, but watch out — they’ll happily bite you as well as horses.

Horseflies can give humans, horses, cattle and other large mammals a painful bite, and summer is when they’re likely to attack.
Here’s what you need to know about the pesky varmints:

What do horseflies look like?

Horseflies are black or dark brown, and can range in size from about 10mm to 25mm long.

Horseflies can be found in fields and hedgerows, especially near water, and around stables and cattle.

They tend to be seen in the UK from around May, when adult flies emerge from mud where they’ve grown after hatching, to September and are active during the day, particularly when the sun’s out and highest, around noon.

Horseflies make a low-pitched humming noise when they fly, and aren’t nearly as noisy as mosquitoes, so unfortunately you don’t always hear them coming.

Why do horseflies bite?

It’s only female horseflies that suck the blood of mammals. Males are nectar feeders and help with pollination.

Female horseflies cut their victim’s skin with their specially-designed sharp, knife-like mandibles, and then lick the blood. They may even chase you (they want your blood!), and can fly at speeds of up to 15 mph.

What does a horsefly bite look and feel like?

A horsefly bite is a red, itchy, raised and painful bump. It will usually only be painful for a few hours. They can bite through thin layers of clothing too.

What should I do if I’m bitten by a horselfy?

To treat a horsefly bite, cool the area with a wet cold flannel, a cool pack or ice cubes wrapped in a cloth or in a bag. Disinfect the bitten area by cleaning it thoroughly with soap and water, antiseptic wipes or alcohol or vinegar. If the bite’s troubling you, take an antihistamine to reduce itching, or try special after-bite medication available from pharmacies.

Some people are allergic to the bites and may develop a skin rash, hives and wheezing. And watch out for infection, as horseflies move from one host to another, they may carry disease, which is why it’s important to clean and monitor a horsefly bite. If the bitten area stays red and swollen or becomes crusty and yellow, seek medical attention.

The best way to deter horseflies is by using fly spray, and rugs and masks for horses. However, one spray won’t get rid of every type of horsefly.

Have you been troubled by horseflies? Tell us in the Comments section below.

home.bt.com

Horsefly bites: What to do if you get bitten this summer

It’s horsefly season – here’s 20 things you should know about the nasty flying and bloodsucking critters.

They might be called horseflies, but watch out — they’ll happily bite you as well as horses.

Horseflies can give humans, horses, cattle and other large mammals a painful bite, and summer is when they’re likely to attack.
Here’s what you need to know about the pesky varmints:

What do horseflies look like?

Horseflies are black or dark brown, and can range in size from about 10mm to 25mm long.

Horseflies can be found in fields and hedgerows, especially near water, and around stables and cattle.

They tend to be seen in the UK from around May, when adult flies emerge from mud where they’ve grown after hatching, to September and are active during the day, particularly when the sun’s out and highest, around noon.

Horseflies make a low-pitched humming noise when they fly, and aren’t nearly as noisy as mosquitoes, so unfortunately you don’t always hear them coming.

Why do horseflies bite?

It’s only female horseflies that suck the blood of mammals. Males are nectar feeders and help with pollination.

Female horseflies cut their victim’s skin with their specially-designed sharp, knife-like mandibles, and then lick the blood. They may even chase you (they want your blood!), and can fly at speeds of up to 15 mph.

What does a horsefly bite look and feel like?

A horsefly bite is a red, itchy, raised and painful bump. It will usually only be painful for a few hours. They can bite through thin layers of clothing too.

What should I do if I’m bitten by a horselfy?

To treat a horsefly bite, cool the area with a wet cold flannel, a cool pack or ice cubes wrapped in a cloth or in a bag. Disinfect the bitten area by cleaning it thoroughly with soap and water, antiseptic wipes or alcohol or vinegar. If the bite’s troubling you, take an antihistamine to reduce itching, or try special after-bite medication available from pharmacies.

Some people are allergic to the bites and may develop a skin rash, hives and wheezing. And watch out for infection, as horseflies move from one host to another, they may carry disease, which is why it’s important to clean and monitor a horsefly bite. If the bitten area stays red and swollen or becomes crusty and yellow, seek medical attention.

The best way to deter horseflies is by using fly spray, and rugs and masks for horses. However, one spray won’t get rid of every type of horsefly.

Have you been troubled by horseflies? Tell us in the Comments section below.

home.bt.com

Share:
No comments

Добавить комментарий

Your e-mail will not be published. All fields are required.

×
Recommend
Adblock
detector