Help! Fleas in apartment and can — t get rid of them, Yahoo Answers

Help! Fleas in apartment and can’t get rid of them!?

I do not have any pets and I haven’t been in contact with any either. I live in a garage apartment in a city (but have trees around my apartment, squirrels run across it often, and walk through grass to get to apartment). I believe I first tracked one in from outside. I have set off a flea bomb that claimed to stop fleas in larval stage and adult stage for 7 months. Before that I used spray often. I also have mopped with pinesol and I vacuum often. I have a flea trap out (with the light and glue trap underneath) and I keep finding small ones in there! I know they’re fleas because I’ve seen them jump and I see the two long strong hind legs when I look at my glue trap.

I thought I’d gotten them under control but I found one in bathtub, one in sink, and one actually standing on the plastic on my flea trap today.

I am a very busy graduate student and I do not have time for this! I have lost many precious study hours cleaning and cleaning and cleaning and battling and I cannot keep on like this!

I have been eating garlic and taking Super B complexes incase those methods work. I have not gotten bit in a couple weeks. I wear long pants and shirts with thick black socks when i’m inside and immediately out of the shower get dressed.

I have no idea what else to do. I hate using all of these chemicals and breathing them in (I do properly air out for 30 min and follow guidelines but I know it lingers).

ANY suggestions will help!

Please. Anything. I am just one person, in an apartment, with no pets, and fleas.

4 Answers

I’ll give you a safe, non toxic treatment: Diatomaceous Earth. It is the same stuff sold as «Pool Filter Powder.» It is white and is the exoskeletons of tiny sea creatures that died eons ago and collected in layers in the Earth. To us it looks like a fine white, or off white, powder but to the flea larva it is a big pile of broken glass. It punctures their skin and they basically ooze out their bodily fluids. It works on slugs and small larva of any kind as well. It is non toxic and is even used in some food products. Just don’t raise up cloud of it and inhale it as over long exposure, it can harm the lungs.

Cedar is also a flea deterrent. The aromatic cedar oil in the wood acts as a repellant.

Fleas are really tough to get rid of. I know this from personal experience. They lay eggs in clusters called egg sacks. You can actually see them if you have good vision or with a magnifying glass. They deposit them in any crack or crevice. The average household has far too many places where fleas can hide their egg sacks. I had fleas in my workshop which has a concrete floor. I had taken in a feral cat to get rid of the mouse problem — he did but he brought in fleas. I eventually took him home but the fleas went absolutely nuts in the shop when the warm weather came around. It was like a horror movie — swarms of fleas attacking my legs. I mopped with bleach and ammonia while wearing a respirator (bleach and ammonia makes poisonous ammonia gas), I used flea bombs, flea powder and mopped with flea poison. It didn’t work.

I finally got rid of them by getting down on my hands and knees with two pairs of reading glasses and a wire brush and scraped the egg sacks out of every crack and crevice on the floor. Then I rented a steam cleaner and went over the floor. I bought a big bag of pool powder and scattered it everywhere. I also bought two big bags of cedar chips and scattered them too. This did the trick.

Now, I don’t think you will want to go to those extremes but you have seen that «flea bombs» and «flea powder» do not work and you realize that they have all kinds of nasty things in them such as permethrin which is a neurotoxin. You may have some success by sprinkling diatomaceous earth around in conjunction with cedar chips. The key is spreading it virtually everywhere and letting it sit for a good long time — like a week. Yes it looks messy but the cedar smells nice and you don’t want fleas.

The other important thing to understand is that fleas go through metamorphosis — four stages of life. You can not do anything about the adults other than to trap them. Fleas are easiest to kill when in the larva and pupa stage. Yes, it will take up some of your valuable time but there is no easy way to get rid of these vermin.

answers.yahoo.com

Help! Fleas in apartment and can’t get rid of them!?

I do not have any pets and I haven’t been in contact with any either. I live in a garage apartment in a city (but have trees around my apartment, squirrels run across it often, and walk through grass to get to apartment). I believe I first tracked one in from outside. I have set off a flea bomb that claimed to stop fleas in larval stage and adult stage for 7 months. Before that I used spray often. I also have mopped with pinesol and I vacuum often. I have a flea trap out (with the light and glue trap underneath) and I keep finding small ones in there! I know they’re fleas because I’ve seen them jump and I see the two long strong hind legs when I look at my glue trap.

I thought I’d gotten them under control but I found one in bathtub, one in sink, and one actually standing on the plastic on my flea trap today.

I am a very busy graduate student and I do not have time for this! I have lost many precious study hours cleaning and cleaning and cleaning and battling and I cannot keep on like this!

I have been eating garlic and taking Super B complexes incase those methods work. I have not gotten bit in a couple weeks. I wear long pants and shirts with thick black socks when i’m inside and immediately out of the shower get dressed.

I have no idea what else to do. I hate using all of these chemicals and breathing them in (I do properly air out for 30 min and follow guidelines but I know it lingers).

ANY suggestions will help!

Please. Anything. I am just one person, in an apartment, with no pets, and fleas.

4 Answers

I’ll give you a safe, non toxic treatment: Diatomaceous Earth. It is the same stuff sold as «Pool Filter Powder.» It is white and is the exoskeletons of tiny sea creatures that died eons ago and collected in layers in the Earth. To us it looks like a fine white, or off white, powder but to the flea larva it is a big pile of broken glass. It punctures their skin and they basically ooze out their bodily fluids. It works on slugs and small larva of any kind as well. It is non toxic and is even used in some food products. Just don’t raise up cloud of it and inhale it as over long exposure, it can harm the lungs.

Cedar is also a flea deterrent. The aromatic cedar oil in the wood acts as a repellant.

Fleas are really tough to get rid of. I know this from personal experience. They lay eggs in clusters called egg sacks. You can actually see them if you have good vision or with a magnifying glass. They deposit them in any crack or crevice. The average household has far too many places where fleas can hide their egg sacks. I had fleas in my workshop which has a concrete floor. I had taken in a feral cat to get rid of the mouse problem — he did but he brought in fleas. I eventually took him home but the fleas went absolutely nuts in the shop when the warm weather came around. It was like a horror movie — swarms of fleas attacking my legs. I mopped with bleach and ammonia while wearing a respirator (bleach and ammonia makes poisonous ammonia gas), I used flea bombs, flea powder and mopped with flea poison. It didn’t work.

I finally got rid of them by getting down on my hands and knees with two pairs of reading glasses and a wire brush and scraped the egg sacks out of every crack and crevice on the floor. Then I rented a steam cleaner and went over the floor. I bought a big bag of pool powder and scattered it everywhere. I also bought two big bags of cedar chips and scattered them too. This did the trick.

Now, I don’t think you will want to go to those extremes but you have seen that «flea bombs» and «flea powder» do not work and you realize that they have all kinds of nasty things in them such as permethrin which is a neurotoxin. You may have some success by sprinkling diatomaceous earth around in conjunction with cedar chips. The key is spreading it virtually everywhere and letting it sit for a good long time — like a week. Yes it looks messy but the cedar smells nice and you don’t want fleas.

The other important thing to understand is that fleas go through metamorphosis — four stages of life. You can not do anything about the adults other than to trap them. Fleas are easiest to kill when in the larva and pupa stage. Yes, it will take up some of your valuable time but there is no easy way to get rid of these vermin.

au.answers.yahoo.com

How to Easily Remove and Kill Fleas in Clothes

Fleas in clothes can be devastating due to the simple fact that while they might not always transmit diseases, they could cause an annoying and intense itch. Also, many people are allergic to flea bites and can develop pus filled blisters or other skin infections. Therefore, read this guide if you want to learn the safest and most effective way to get rid of fleas in your clothes.

How do they get there in the first place?

Adult fleas generally live on blood meals which they obtain from animals, but pet owners have to deal with flea eggs and larvae in their carpets and rugs when the fleas reproduce. The flea larvae, in turn, feed on dandruff, discarded skin and other organic animal/human waste that is readily found in pet fur and human clothing.

For pet owners allowing pets to sleep in their beds, fleas become a common occurrence in bed clothing, linen and mattresses. Flea eggs usually drop into cracks, crevices and other hiding places that are found abundantly in bedrooms.

Fleas like warm temperatures (optimally in the range of 65 to 80 deg F) with relative humidity, all of which are readily available in human clothing. They often jump off and latch onto their animal hosts to get a blood meal, but in the absence of animals, the fleas can also bite and feed off humans.

Today, fleas are found in urban residential areas, classrooms in schools, rental apartments which previously housed pets and even grassy hiking trails or wooded areas. Fleas can even come from possums, squirrels, raccoons, birds and feral cats. For that reason, it is essential for everyone to understand how to remove and kill fleas in clothes effectively.

How to get rid of fleas in clothes

You can try washing flea infested clothes in regular temperature or cold water first, however, to remove flea larvae and flea eggs in clothes, it is best to follow some stringent and more effective laundry techniques.

1. Use bleach mixed with water

For clothes that can withstand bleach, use diluted bleach in water and immerse the flea infested clothes in the solution. For machine wash, it is recommended mixing 1 cup of chlorine bleach per 16 gallons of water. Bleach can kill and disinfect clothes to remove most fleas and their eggs.

2. Use max settings on your washing machine

Use the highest water setting, hottest temperature and longest wash cycle allowed by your washing machine for clothes that can withstand this harsh treatment. This is a sure-fire method for removing fleas in clothes and can kill eggs and fleas in their larval stages.

3. Use antimicrobial detergent

For clothes that are not bleach-safe, you can use detergents with antimicrobial action or pine oil and other phenolic disinfectants. To use these in washing machines, add 1 cup to top loading machines and ½ cup to front loading machines.

  1. Check if your clothes can withstand bleach
  2. Mix 1 cup of chlorine bleach with 16 gallons of water
  3. Wash the clothes on max water, temperature and wash cycle setting
  4. If your clothes are not bleach-safe, use antimicrobial detergent (top loading machines: 1 cup, front loading machines: ½ cup)

The integrated pest control program

Did you know that only 10% of fleas found inside a household are adults, while the remaining 90% are in various life cycle stages, like eggs and larvae?

Naturally, even if you follow the methods mentioned above for removing fleas from your clothes, you must also use an integrated pest control program to ensure complete flea elimination. This includes managing habitats of host animals, destroying resident fleas and preventing new infestations. Here are some effective ways to accomplish this:

1. Vacuum daily

Vacuum your entire house including all rugs, carpets and especially hard-to-access areas, like behind and under the furniture.

It is important that you seal the vacuum bags and immediately discard them outside the home afterwards.

2. Wash and launder regularly

Apart from washing your clothes using the steps given above, wash and clean your pet’s bedding and all household linen including towels, bed sheets, curtains, mattress covers, blankets and comforters etc. and if needed, opt for having these dry cleaned or professionally treated. You can even take bulky linen to the Laundromat for some heavy duty cleaning.

3. Protect your pets

Flea foggers, powders and sprays as well as spot treatment for pets is an important part of integrated pest control.

You can talk to your vet about the right oral or topical flea medicines to stop fleas from laying eggs and reproducing.

4. Try natural flea products

Treatment using naturally occurring flea products is another way of getting rid of flea eggs in carpets and rugs.

It is important to remember that flea eggs can remain dormant inside your home for a very long time, even during the winter. For this reason, I recommend all year round flea control if you live in an area that is heavily infested with fleas.

Wear protective clothes to prevent flea bites

While the flea treatment is taking place, you and your family can protect yourselves by wearing clothes that prevent fleas from biting you. Lighter colored clothes generally provide fewer hiding places than darker ones. You can also wear long trousers and full sleeved shirts as well as thick socks to stop the flea bites. Additionally, you must wash all these items as mentioned above to ensure the complete removal of fleas in your clothes.

Related Posts

There is no magic formula for controlling ticks and fleas on your pets. No matter…

While fleas are more of a problem in the summer months, for pet owners, they…

Fleas are a nuisance for pet owners and controlling them often involves a struggle that…

www.fleabites.net

Fleas in an apartment: Who’s responsible?

Nathan McBride

I have a tenant in an upstairs unit that notified me that they have fleas in their apartment. This is a two-story standalone building consisting of two efficiency apartments, one on top of the other.

The tenant below them does not have fleas, and neither do the tenants in the front house.

I bug bombed the apartment in question, and the tenant claims to have bombed it again. But they said they still have fleas.

At this point, I feel like it is fairly safe to say that they brought the fleas in with them or at least their cleaning habits (or lack thereof) have contributed to the problem.

Anyway, my question is who is ultimately responsible in this case? I’ve been trying to treat the place, but if they don’t clean up after themselves, there’s only so much I can do. Fleas love hiding in piles of dirty laundry.

Treatment would be simple if they and their stuff were out of the apartment.

To prevent this problem in the future, I will be putting pest control on the tenant in my leases (but continuing to spray the outside).

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Will Gaston

@Nathan McBride this is a tough one because if it spreads into the other apartments then it will ultimately become your problem entirely.

I have lots of student rentals and have dealt with some version of this 10,000 times. I pay to have it professionally done and taken care of at no charge. I let them know that I’m billing them for any issues after that.

It’s not fair to you but if it spreads to the other apartments then it’s going to worsen your situation.

John Underwood

@Nathan McBride What does your lease say? This should be spelled out there.

If it is not then you may have to pay a professional to come in as the bug bobs are not getting the job done.

You didn’t mention if they have pets that may have brought in the fleas.

You definitely don’t want this spreading to the other units. Another good reason for you to just go ahead and make sure this is handled by a professional.

Nathan McBride

@John Underwood The lease doesn’t mention pest control (lesson learned there), so I guess I’m on the hook for the treatment. And yes, they have a ferret, which could be the culprit.

I like @Will Gaston ‘s idea of doing the treatment with the understanding that the tenants pay for any issues going forward.

Thanks for the advice!

Marcia Maynard

If you don’t have one in place already, add a pet agreement to the addendum that requires the tenant to do what it takes to be a responsible pet owner. This includes veterinarian care. The vet will be able to determine if the ferret has fleas. Google «ferret fleas» and learn about some strategies for dealing with fleas. Rethink about allowing tenants to have pets that attract fleas. Enforce the terms of your agreement regarding cleanliness and care for the unit. Enlist the services of a qualified pest management company for treatment and recommendations. Good luck!

Nathan Schiess

@Will Gaston made a great point about curtailing the damage that has already been done. @John Underwood and @Marcia Maynard explained that to prevent this from happening in the future, the lease needs to be revisited and addenda for pets and pest control need to be added. Adding an addendum usually only requires a 30 day to 60 day notice.

In addition to that, if you did a pre move-in inspection of the property that verifies that the property was «flea-free» when they moved in and have confirmation from a pest control professional that the flee infestation is the fault of the occupants and/or their pets, I would first, politely make a proposition to share the costs of getting the problem professionally handled. If that doesn’t work, consider taking legal action (posting a 3 day comply or vacate) and at the very lease make sure that you:

1. Require them to provide documentation that their animal is licensed, vaccinated, and flee free

2. Obtain documentation from the pest control company that the property is flee free after it has been treated

This way it will be easier to enforce your policies in the future and have them pay for any further damage.

www.biggerpockets.com

Share:
No comments

Добавить комментарий

Your e-mail will not be published. All fields are required.

×
Recommend