Dangers If Lice Is Left Untreated

Dangers If Lice Is Left Untreated

Head lice is something that no one would wish upon their household. When we hear the word lice, we typically picture loads upon loads of laundry and lots of scrubbing in the shower, but this isn’t an accurate depiction.

While head lice is unpleasant, to say the least, and you may be tempted to avoid dealing with treating it all together, we’ll show you what can happen if you leave head lice alone.

Source: @sezar4321 via gfycat.com

What Are Head Lice?

Head lice have been plaguing families for centuries and they continue to be an issue today. Head lice are small, wingless insects that feed on human blood that they draw from the scalp. They lay tiny eggs on the hair shaft which hatch and grow into adults. They leave their egg cases behind and these cases move down the hair shaft as the hair grows.

How Do You Get Head Lice?

Lice move extremely quickly and they scurry from one person’s head to another. Contrary to popular belief, lice do not fly or jump from head to head. Instead, you can contract lice through sharing clothing, scarves, hats, or hair brushes with a person who has lice. Head to head contact is another way that lice can move from person to person as well as sharing a bed or linens like towels with someone who has head lice.

If you or someone in your household has head lice, immediate treatment is crucial in keeping the infestation at bay.

Children as especially susceptible to catching head lice at school, daycare, or during extra-curricular activities. Many people have misconceptions about who can get head lice. For example, it’s a common belief that adults do not get lice or that men are immune to head lice because lice do not like testosterone, but this information is inaccurate. Anyone can get lice, including adult men and women. This includes parents, teachers, and other caregivers.

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For humans, there are three types of lice: head lice, body lice, and pubic lice. These types of lice are isolated to their own respective areas and cannot move around the body. It’s also important to note that animals can’t pass lice on to people or vice versa.

What Are the Symptoms of Head Lice?

If you’re wondering if you or your child has head lice, there are several telltale signs to watch for. Lice is most often associated with head scratching. An itchy or tingly scalp is one of the first indicators of lice, but this symptom often doesn’t appear for four to six weeks after a lice infestation begins. By that time, the lice have had the chance to multiply and spread.

Another head lice sign to watch for is a red, bumpy rash around the base of the neck and the ears. You may also notice that your child is more irritable or tired than normal. This is because head lice are most active at night, which can result in a poor sleep due to head scratching. If you see your child continuously scratching their head in their sleep, make sure to check their head for lice.

You may also notice flakes in the hair that look like dandruff, but unlike dandruff flakes, they aren’t easily removed and cling to the hair shaft. These flakes are the discarded egg cases that appear once young lice hatch and their cases stick to the hair.

What are the Risks of Leaving Head Lice Untreated?

Many people are tempted to skip lice treatments altogether for a variety of reasons. They may be squeamish about dealing with insects, they may want to limit their exposure to chemicals, they may want to save money by not purchasing lice removal kits, or they may simply be misinformed and think that lice will go away on their own. Unfortunately, this isn’t true and treatment is a must if you or other members of your household have lice.

Worsening Condition

If left untreated, a lice infestation will continue to worsen as the eggs hatch, become adults, and continue to feed on the blood from the scalp, only to lay more eggs and continue the cycle. The worse your infestation becomes, the harder it is to treat. Imagine removing hundreds of eggs, adult lice, and egg cases vs. only a few. If you have a widespread head lice infestation, you’ll likely need several treatments to ensure that you are able to effectively get rid of every last nit.

When discussing the risks associated with not treating lice, it’s important to discuss a common myth, which is that lice carry disease. This is false. Lice don’t carry disease or spread it to humans.

Excessively scratching a rash can put you or your child at a greater risk of a skin infection, but this is not caused by the lice themselves and it’s not cause for worry about lice-borne disease. While lice are bothersome and can cause great anxiety in some people, they cannot make you sick.

Spreading To Other Family Members & Friends

The longer you or your child has head lice, the more likely it is to spread to other members of the family, friends, or classmates. If one person in your home has lice, it’s easier to isolate the issue than it is if an entire family has it.

When several members of the same household have lice, it can be hard to contain, because as one person becomes treated the other person’s lice can continue to spread.

More Difficult Treatment

Left untreated, head lice not only puts you at risk of a widespread infestation that affects your whole household, but the affected people will experience a great deal of discomfort. If one or two adult lice make your head tingle and itch, imagine what it will feel like with dozens of them crawling on your head. That thought alone is enough to motivate people to get their lice infestation treated immediately.

See also:  How Long Does It Take to Get Lice After Being Exposed?

As we’ve seen here, head lice are an anxiety-causing nuisance that many people deal with on a daily basis. In fact, it’s estimated that up to 12 million children in the US suffer from lice infestations each year, and this doesn’t account for parents, teachers, and daycare providers.

If you or someone in your household has head lice, immediate treatment is crucial in keeping the infestation at bay. The longer you leave head lice untreated, no matter your reasoning, the worse the problem becomes. Treating lice yourself at home may be a frustrating inconvenience, but it’s a necessity. If you don’t want to treat lice yourself, there are professionals that can do it for you. While these services come at a cost, they will be worth it if you would otherwise leave your family’s head lice infestation untreated.

In Summary

Having head lice is not a dangerous condition – it’s a bother more than anything, but it’s something that must be dealt with in a timely manner to prevent further discomfort and the risk of spreading the infestation throughout the home and local community.

lice.org

What You Should Know About Head Lice and Their Treatment?

What Are Head Lice?
Head lice are parasites that can be found on the heads of people, especially small children. This is a common problem that usually affects school-aged children and their families. They can easily attach to the hair of anyone’s head. They are tiny bugs about the size of the sesame seeds and their bodies are usually pale and gray, but their color may also vary.

What Are Some Facts of the Head Lice?
Head lice are parasites that are found on human heads and they spread from person-to-person by head-to-head contact through direct contact with the hair of an infected person. They also spread by personal sharing of personal belongings like combs, caps, brushes, and other clothing items.

What are the Signs and Symptoms of Head Lice Infestation?
There are many signs and symptoms of head lice infestation that are:
. A tickling feeling of something moving in the hair
. Itching
. Sores on the head that is caused by scratching
. Irritability

What Do Head Lice Look Like? And What Is the Life Cycle of the Head Lice?
There are basically three forms of the lice that are the nit, the nymph and the adult louse.

. Nit: Nits are lice eggs that are hard to see and are often confused with dandruff or hair spray droplets. They are found firmly attached to the hair shaft and are usually yellow to white in color. They take about a one week to hatch.

. Nymph: The nit hatches into a baby louse called a nymph. They look like an adult head louse but are smaller. They mature into adults about seven days after hatching and to live they must feed on human blood.

. Adult Louse: The size of adult louse is like a sesame seed, has six legs and is tan to grayish-white in color. The adult lice can live up to 30 days on a person’s head. For the living, adult lice need to feed on human blood.

. Life Cycle: The nits hatch into a nymph, which becomes adult lice.

What is the Treatment for a Head Lice Infestation?
For effective elimination of head lice, the infested person, family members that are infested, and the home must all be treated. It is also necessary to remember that the treatment should only be started when the live lice is identified. The ideal treatment of lice should be safe, free of toxic chemicals, easy to use, readily available and effective.

For treatment, you can also apply for lice-killing medicine according to the label instruction and you can also go for a lice treatment in Alpharetta or wherever you are living, for removing the lice and nits from the hair.

medium.com

What are head lice? Can nits jump, what do their eggs look like, what’s the best treatment and how do they spread?

Head lice are a common problem especially for young kids in primary school

  • 3 Aug 2017, 11:20
  • Updated : 3 Aug 2017, 14:31

BEING searched with a ‘nit’ comb is a common experience for youngsters at school — but even adults’ heads can become infested with nits.

Here’s what you need to know about head lice: how they spread, what they look like and how to treat someone who has them.

What are head lice?

Head lice are tiny little insects that live in the hair and can be very difficult to spot, even when the head is closely inspected.

While nits are the empty egg cases that attach themselves to their hair and eventually hatch into head lice.

Lice and nits are a common problem for schoolchildren, especially those in primary school aged between four and 11.

They are largely harmless but should be treated to stop them spreading further. They can cause itching, rashes and a sensation of crawling on the scalp.

How can you catch head lice?

Anybody can catch head lice and they a spread by direct head to head contact.

This is because the lice travel by climbing from one person’s hair to another.

They only spread by direct contact and cannot be spread by objects such as hats, combs, scissors, combs, brushes or pillows.

They don’t have a preference and will infect hair whether it is long, short, clean or dirty.

Only humans can be infected and they can’t be caught from animals. However, once lice detach from the hair, they only live for up to 24 hours before they die.

What do head lice look like?

The lice themselves tend to be very small and a whitish or grey-brown colour.

They can range in size and anywhere between the size of a pinhead to that of a sesame seed.

You may also be able to spot eggs in your hair.

These are white, brown or yellow circular shells that attach themselves to strands of the hair.

Can lice jump?

It is a myth that nits or head lice can jump as the only way they are spread is through direct contact.

Lice and nits are also unable to fly and swim.

The reason why some many children aged four to 11 catch head lice is that they play in close proximity while at primary school.

This means their heads are often close to each other, allowing the lice to easily spread from head to head.

What do nit eggs look like?

Nits and lice are very difficult to spot, even when the head is closely inspected as they are so small.

Nits are tiny, white specks, that are usually found in the hair behind the ears or at the back of the neck.

Meanwhile lice are also small and are usually white, grey or brown in colour. They can range in size from a pinhead to the size of a sesame seed.

The only way to diagnose a case of lice is to find a live louse when combing their hair with a special detection comb.

How do you treat head lice?

There are two ways parents can tackle head lice if their child is found to have been infected.

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The first is to use a lotion or spray that can be easily bought from any pharmacy or supermarket.

These products are applied to the scalp and hair to kill the lice and some need to be done more than once to make sure any newly hatched lice are killed.

It is recommended that the instructions on the products are followed carefully and that it is used by everyone in the household.

The other treatment is wet combing, which sees the lice removed with a special comb which is run through wet hair.

The treatment is relatively cheap, although needs to be done several times for weeks following a head lice infection.

According to NHS Choices, herbal remedies, tree and plant oils and head lice repellents aren’t recommended.

Neither is staying off school or work or washing clothes at a higher temperature as it has no effect tackling the problem.

www.thesun.co.uk

MYTHS & FACTS ABOUT

MORE THAN YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT HEAD LICE

Learn to separate the facts from the myths when deciding the best treatment for you and your family.

FACT #1

About half of all infested individuals do not know they have lice.

FACT #2

Four out of five infested individuals will not feel an itching sensation from a head lice infestation.

FACT #3

Head lice infestations are most common among pre-school and elementary school children.

FACT #4

The food of head lice is human blood.

FACT #5

Only adult lice are capable of changing hosts and starting a new colony.

FACT #6

Girls are much more likely to become infested with head lice than are boys.

FACT #7

Female head lice live about 30 days while males live about 15 days.

FACT #8

Only several weeks after infestation does one feel an itching sensation.

FACT #9

The female head louse can lay between 5-10 eggs per day

FACT #10

On average, an infestation is diagnosed after 4 weeks.

FACT #11

Most head lice are dead within 15 hours of being separated from their host. None can live longer than 48 hours without human blood.

Lice can spread by jumping or flying.

No! Head lice do not jump, fly or swim. They are good crawlers, however, and will readily move from one person to another when the hair of the two people is in contact.

Children get head lice from schools.

Although children can certainly come into contact with other children who have head lice at school, it is not the only place where a transmission might occur. Children can get infested by head-to-head contact at summer camps, sleepovers, and home.

Getting lice is a sign of poor hygiene.

Anyone with hair can get lice. A person’s degree of cleanliness or personal hygiene has little or nothing to do with getting head lice. A common misconception is that lice infestation is a result of poor hygienic practices. In fact, head lice actually seem to prefer clean hair over dirty hair.

Head lice can’t be seen by the naked eye.

Head lice can be seen by the naked eye but it can be very difficult. Adult lice will be the easiest to spot because they are the biggest. But at the size of a sesame seed, they still aren’t that big. Although lice vary in color, if you see a grayish-white or tan bug crawling through the hair, it is probably a louse. If you look closely at an adult louse, you should be able to see human blood inside it.

Head lice can spread disease if not treated quickly.

There are no reliable data to suggest that head lice carry or transmit disease organisms. However, DNA technology shows head lice to be the same species as the notorious body louse which has long been associated with diseases such as typhus and relapsing fever. It may be possible for head lice to carry diseases, but no cases have been reported.

Itchy head means your child has head lice.

While itchy scalp may be a symptom of head lice it is not a definitive sign your child has lice. Itchy scalp can be caused by many things including dandruff or general dry skin.

You can get head lice from your pets.

Lice cannot be transmitted from pets, and pets cannot get them from people.

Head lice can be caught by swimming.

When lice are in water, they go into a state of suspended animation but remain firmly locked onto the hair. This is how they survive shampooing, rain, seawater, and swimming pools. Risk of transmission will occur with the sharing of towels.

Only children can get head lice.

While it’s more commonly spread among children, parents and other adults are not immune.

When hair has contact with another’s hair (and it will), if that person has lice and you are a favorable environment, you take the risk of exposing yourself to an uninvited houseguest.

Common MYTHS about head lice

Common MYTHS about head lice

Lice can spread by jumping or flying.

No! Head lice do not jump, fly or swim. They are good crawlers, however, and will readily move from one person to another when the hair of the two people is in contact.

Children get head lice from schools.

Although children can certainly come into contact with other children who have head lice at school, it is not the only place where a transmission might occur. Children can get infested by head-to-head contact at summer camps, sleepovers, and home.

Getting lice is a sign of poor hygiene.

Anyone with hair can get lice. A person’s degree of cleanliness or personal hygiene has little or nothing to do with getting head lice. A common misconception is that lice infestation is a result of poor hygienic practices. In fact, head lice actually seem to prefer clean hair over dirty hair.

Head lice can’t be seen by the naked eye.

Head lice can be seen by the naked eye but it can be very difficult. Adult lice will be the easiest to spot because they are the biggest. But at the size of a sesame seed, they still aren’t that big. Although lice vary in color, if you see a grayish-white or tan bug crawling through the hair, it is probably a louse. If you look closely at an adult louse, you should be able to see human blood inside it.

Head lice can spread disease if not treated quickly.

There are no reliable data to suggest that head lice carry or transmit disease organisms. However, DNA technology shows head lice to be the same species as the notorious body louse which has long been associated with diseases such as typhus and relapsing fever. It may be possible for head lice to carry diseases, but no cases have been reported.

Itchy head means your child has head lice.

While itchy scalp may be a symptom of head lice it is not a definitive sign your child has lice. Itchy scalp can be caused by many things including dandruff or general dry skin.

You can get head lice from your pets.

Lice cannot be transmitted from pets, and pets cannot get them from people.

See also:  Head Lice Treatment Shampoo – Lyclear

Head lice can be caught by swimming.

When lice are in water, they go into a state of suspended animation but remain firmly locked onto the hair. This is how they survive shampooing, rain, seawater, and swimming pools. Risk of transmission will occur with the sharing of towels.

Only children can get head lice.

While it’s more commonly spread among children, parents and other adults are not immune.

When hair has contact with another’s hair (and it will), if that person has lice and you are a favorable environment, you take the risk of exposing yourself to an uninvited houseguest.

Still have any questions about head lice?

Where do head lice come from?

Head lice have been around for millions of years and dried up lice and their eggs have been found on the hair and scalps of Egyptian mummies! Head lice do not come out of the air or from the ground. They are human parasites that feed on blood and travel from one head to another. Head lice are uniquely adapted to be on a human head. They would never choose to come off of a head and onto a pillow, hat, chair, etc.

How are head lice spread?

Head lice can be spread whenever there is direct head-to-head contact with an infested individual. Lice may also be transmitted by items such as hats, hair ties, scarves, pillows, etc. However, this type of transfer is probably quite rare.

Is it possible to get head lice from sharing a pillow or hat with a person who has head lice?

Lice cannot typically survive off of a human host longer than 15 hours (but none can live longer than 48 hours) and they are uniquely adapted for living in human head hair. They generally do not like to leave the protected environment created within head hair.

What are the symptoms of head lice?

Head lice are most commonly found on the scalp, behind the ears and near the neckline at the base of the head. Symptoms include a tickling sensation or feeling something moving through the hair. An allergic reaction to the bites causes itching. Viable eggs are usually located within 1/4 inch (6mm) of the scalp.

What do head lice and their eggs look like?

The adult louse is no bigger than a sesame seed and is grayish-white or tan. Nymphs (baby lice) are smaller, and can be black, clear, or even blood red. Lice eggs, often called nits, look like tiny yellow, tan, or brown dots before they hatch. After hatching, the remaining shell looks white or clear. Nits are literally glued to the hair shaft and are very difficult to remove.

What can be done to get rid of head lice and the eggs?

Clinical trials have shown the OneCure™ device, which uses carefully controlled heated air, is a safe treatment that is highly effective at not only killing the live lice but also their eggs.

Increasing numbers of consumers are finding that the most popular treatments for head lice – including chemical shampoos and home remedies – are largely ineffective. Head lice are rapidly evolving chemical resistance to many of the traditional pesticide-based control methods (which have never been able to kill eggs (nits) effectively and usually require repeated treatments). Louse combs can be effective for removing lice and eggs, but the comb-out process can be very tedious, and many busy parents do not have the time or patience for effective combing. In desperation, some parents resort to home remedies such as bug spray, mayonnaise or kerosene, but there is little hard evidence that these remedies are effective, and some home remedies can actually be harmful. As a result, parents and school authorities are searching for a safe, fast and effective treatment that will solve the problem and help keep children in or quickly return them to school.

What is the life cycle of head lice and their eggs?

Eggs: Eggs are laid by adult female lice and usually take about a week to hatch into nymphs.

Nymphs: Nymphs are immature lice that mature into adults about a week after hatching from the egg.

Adults: Adult lice can live about 30 days on a person’s head. If they come off the host, they usually die within 24 hours. Female adult lice lay 4 to 8 eggs per day and can lay 100 or more eggs during their lifetime. The eggs are glued to hair shafts and hatch in 4-10 days. It takes another 9-12 days for the female louse to mature. She mates 24 hours later and starts laying eggs.

What is the difference between an egg and a nit?

There is not a difference although a nit is usually referred to as the empty shell and the egg as a viable egg. Sometimes people refer to one or the other in relation to its viability.

How can I tell if the nits are dead or alive?

Although a microscope would be able to show you whether an egg is empty or not, there is no way to tell whether a non-empty shell is viable or not.

What are some steps I can take to help prevent and control the spread of head lice?

Avoid head to head contact during play, sleepovers, or other activities at home, school, and elsewhere. Do not share combs, brushes or towels used by an infested person. Do not share clothing such as hats, scarves, coats, hair ribbons or barrettes. Machine wash and dry clothing, bed linens, and other items that an infested person used or wore during the previous 2 days using a hot water laundry cycle and high heat drying cycle. Do not use fumigant sprays or fogs; they are not necessary to control head lice and can be toxic if inhaled or absorbed through the skin.

Do I have to treat everyone if only one person is found to have head lice?

It is very common for close family or friends of infested individuals to also have lice. It is suggested that you check everyone in the household. You do not want to treat anyone who does not have lice, however many clients who have a family member with lice will choose to have a dimethicone oil treatment. This treatment, which is completely non-toxic, is a quick and easy way to kill any small bug that may be in the hair, but is very hard to find.

How do I treat my home for head lice?

Vacuum the carpet and furniture; wash bedding and clothing in very hot water; place pillows in a dryer at highest heat setting for 20 to 30 minutes; boil hair ties/hair brushes for 10 to 20 minutes or freeze them in a plastic bag overnight. Head lice cannot survive off of a human head for more than 15 hours (but none can live longer than 48 hours). It is recommended that you do not use pesticide sprays in your home; they will unnecessarily expose your household to harmful chemicals.

What about combs, brushes, and hair accessories?

You can place them on the top rack of the dishwasher or soak items in HOT (not boiling) water for 20 minutes. You can also put them in a plastic bag in the freezer for 24 hours.

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