Bug, Definition of Bug at

What the bugs look like: the structure and photo of the insect, the size of the bed variety and their characteristics

Contents

I was thinking about retiring from modeling, but spending that time with them rekindled that bug .

But is bug protein really any better than traditional protein sources, like chicken, or your go-to protein powder?

Their company, Ready to Go Survival, sells prepacked survival, or “ bug out,” bags and kits.

If Silver turns out to be wrong about this election Wang told me Silver “can eat a bug .”

Across business, foreign policy, and popular culture, more Americans are discovering Africa and catching the bug .

The term » bug » has almost become a popular synonym for «insect.»

Bug ‘s hair was a mop of soft ringlets, and his brown eyes and innocent baby face were appealing.

It may be true, but a person who was not a naturalist would feel safer about it if he had the opinion of the bug .

He sees here mounted specimens of bug and butterfly, bird, fish and beast.

But there it was, the bug had been seen, and the whole room was overhauled.

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British Dictionary definitions for bug (1 of 4)

verb bugs , bugging or bugged informal

Word Origin for bug

British Dictionary definitions for bug (2 of 4)

Word Origin for bug

British Dictionary definitions for bug (3 of 4)

British Dictionary definitions for bug (4 of 4)

Medical definitions for bug

Scientific definitions for bug

Usage

The word bug is often used to refer to tiny creatures that crawl along, such as insects and even small animals that are not insects, such as spiders and millipedes. But for scientists the word has a much narrower meaning. In the strictest terms bugs are those insects that have mouthparts adapted for piercing and sucking. The mouthparts of these bugs are contained in a beak-shaped structure. Thus scientists would classify a louse but not a beetle or a cockroach as a bug. In fact, scientists often call lice and their relatives true bugs to distinguish them better from what everyone else calls “bugs.”

Cultural definitions for bug

A generic term that describes a malfunction of undetermined origin in a computer or other electronic device.

notes for bug

Idioms and Phrases with bug

In addition to the idioms beginning with bug

  • cute as a button (bug’s ear)
  • put a bug in someone’s ear
  • snug as a bug in a rug
  • what’s eating (bugging) you

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Meet The Tiny Critters Thriving In Your Carpet, Kitchen And Bed

With the weather warming, it’s the season for spring cleaning. But before you reach for the broom and mop, consider who else is sharing your home. The variety of uninvited guests in your dustpan may surprise you.

A recent study published in the journal PeerJ took up the challenge of cataloging the large numbers of tiny animals — arthropods — that live in modern human dwellings. In 50 houses in and around Raleigh, N. C., the research team found about a hundred different species of arthropods in each home. The tally included familiar types — like flies, spiders and ants — but also some species that are less well known, such as gall wasps and book lice.

Grains of uncooked rice dwarf this book louse. Though book lice thrive in most human homes, they largely go unnoticed. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

Grains of uncooked rice dwarf this book louse. Though book lice thrive in most human homes, they largely go unnoticed.

«Even as entomologists we were really surprised,» says Michelle Trautwein, now assistant curator of entomology at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. She led the research team, which was based at North Carolina State University in Raleigh.

«We live in our houses all the time,» Trautwein says, «so we thought we’d be more familiar with the kind of things we’d come across.»

It didn’t seem to matter how much the human residents cleaned, she says. «There was a surprising level of biodiversity.»

The scientists donned headlamps and knee pads in their hunt for arthropods — creatures that have exoskeletons, multiple appendages and segmented bodies. They collected flies from windowsills, spiders from under sinks and took samples of dust from corners, carpets and rugs — combing through it to find speck-sized creatures.

Entomologist Michelle Trautwein searches a kitchen windowsill, a common place to find arthropods that wandered in from the surrounding environment. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

Entomologist Michelle Trautwein searches a kitchen windowsill, a common place to find arthropods that wandered in from the surrounding environment.

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Any arthropod they turned up was examined by a team of entomologists, using both genetic analysis and traditional visual identification under a microscope.

Among their findings: Homes with kids and pets tended to have the largest variety of these diminutive lodgers. And there were more different species of arthropod on lower floors of a building than higher floors. Common rooms, carpeted rooms and rooms with more windows and doors to the outside seemed to have a greater diversity of micro-guests.

Most of the different types of arthropods they turned up were essentially harmless, and just wandered in from outside.

«The vast majority of things we found don’t bite or sting or feed on our food,» Trautwein says. «Most of them have no effect on our daily lives.»

And many of them live in house dust — a collection of dirt, lint, pollen, hair, pet fur, and flakes of skin shed by humans and pets. Turns out that constant rain of skin is a great source of food for one particular roommate — the house dust mite.

Dust mites are arachnids — small relatives of spiders. Lined up end to end, five dust mites would fit between two millimeter marks on a ruler. Barely visible to the naked eye, dust mites under the microscope look like translucent jellybeans with legs. They don’t hunt; they just munch on the steady supply of skin flakes we all slough every day.

Dead skin is mainly composed of keratin, a tough structural protein that also gives shape to nails and hair. It’s not a particularly nutritious food, but it is abundant. Dust mites use powerful enzymes to break down the keratin and digest it. After that the mites produce waste pellets at a prodigious rate. Along with the exoskeletons the mites shed as they grow, the poop becomes part of the dust in our homes.

Those mite leavings can affect human health; the droppings contain enzymes that can provoke an allergic reaction in the lungs of some people who inhale the dust. Research suggests allergies to dust mites may be a major contributor to childhood asthma.

Dust mites didn’t start out in human homes. A few years ago, scientists at the University of Michigan found genetic evidence that one type of common dust mite had a parasitic ancestor that clung to birds. It may have gone on to colonize warm, humid nests, too, feeding on sloughed skin and feathers — and some descendant ultimately wandered into the dusty, human nests we call home today.

If the idea of mites in your house give you the creeps, you can somewhat reduce their numbers Trautwein says, by vacuuming and mopping often, ditching the wall-to-wall carpets, and avoiding humid climes — dust mites are rare in the desert. The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology advises regular use of a vacuum with a HEPA filter, among other measures, if somebody in your home suffers from dust allergies.

Or, you don’t have these allergies, you might just relax — and realize you can’t rid your home of all arthropod visitors.

This Storage Mite is smaller than a grain of sand. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

www.npr.org

The Vagina

Original Author(s): Louisa Thompson
Last updated: April 13, 2020
Revisions: 53

Original Author(s): Louisa Thompson
Last updated: April 13, 2020
Revisions: 53

The vagina is an organ of the female reproductive tract. It is a distensible muscular tube which extends posterosuperiorly from the external vaginal orifice to the cervix.

It has several roles within the female reproductive system:

  • Sexual intercourse – receives the penis and ejaculate, assisting in its transport to the uterus.
  • Childbirth – expands to provide a channel for delivery of a newborn from the uterus.
  • Menstruation – serves as a canal for menstrual fluid and tissue to leave the body.

In this article, we will look at the anatomy of the vagina – its structure, innervation, vascular and lymphatic supply.

Fig 1 – Overview of the female reproductive tract.

Anatomical Position

The vagina is closely related to many of the organs in the pelvic region:

  • Anterior – bladder and urethra.
  • Posterior – rectouterine pouch, rectum and anal canal.
  • Lateral – ureters and levator ani muscle.

Fig 2 – Sagittal section of the female pelvis, showing the anatomical relations of the vagina.

Anatomical Structure

The vagina is a fibromuscular tube with anterior and posterior walls – these are normally collapsed and thus in contact with one another.

The shape of the vagina is not a round tunnel. In the transverse plane it is more like an “H” lying on the side. At the upper ending, the vagina surrounds the cervix, creating two domes (fornices or vaults): an anterior and a (deeper) posterior one.

The posterior fornix is important as it acts like a natural reservoir for semen after intravaginal ejaculation. The semen retained in the fornix liquefies in the next 20-30 mins, allowing for easier permeation through the cervical canal.

Fig 3 – The anterior and posterior vaginal fornices

Histology of the Vagina

The vagina is composed of four histological layers (internal to external):

  • Stratified squamous epithelium – this layer provides protection and is lubricated by cervical mucus (the vagina itself does not contain any glands).
  • Elastic lamina propria – a dense connective tissue layer which projects papillae into the overlying epithelium. The larger veins are located here.
  • Fibromuscular layer – comprising two layers of smooth muscle; an inner circular and an outer longitudinal layer.
  • Adventitia – a fibrous layer, which provides additional strength to the vagina whilst also binding it to surrounding structures.

Vascular Supply and Lymphatics

The arterial supply to the vagina is via the uterine and vaginal arteries – both branches of the internal iliac artery.

Venous return is by the vaginal venous plexus, which drains into the internal iliac veins via the uterine vein.

Lymphatic drainage is divided into three sections:

  • Superior – drains to external iliac nodes
  • Middle – drains to internal iliac nodes
  • Inferior – drains to superficial inguinal lymph nodes.

Fig 4 – Posterior view of the arterial supply to the female reproductive tract.

Innervation

Innervation is predominantly from the autonomic nervous system. Parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves arise from the uterovaginal nerve plexus (in turn a subsidiary of the inferior hypogastric plexus).

Only the inferior 1/5 of the vagina receives somatic innervation. This is via a branch of the pudendal nerve, the deep perineal nerve.

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Clinical Relevance: Vaginal (Obstetric) Fistulae

A vaginal fistula is an open communication between the vagina and one of the adjacent pelvic organs.

It typically occurs as a result of prolonged labour (where a Caesarean section is not available). As the fetus slowly progresses down the vaginal wall, it exerts pressure – obstructing the blood supply and causing tissue necrosis.

There are three main types of vaginal fistulae:

  • Vesicovaginal – abnormal communication with the bladder. Urine enters the vagina.
  • Urethrovaginal – abnormal communication with the urethra. Urine only enters the vagina during urination.
  • Rectovaginal – abnormal communication with the rectum. Faecal matter can enter the vagina.

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The vagina is an organ of the female reproductive tract. It is a distensible muscular tube which extends posterosuperiorly from the external vaginal orifice to the cervix.

It has several roles within the female reproductive system:

  • Sexual intercourse — receives the penis and ejaculate, assisting in its transport to the uterus.
  • Childbirth — expands to provide a channel for delivery of a newborn from the uterus.
  • Menstruation — serves as a canal for menstrual fluid and tissue to leave the body.

In this article, we will look at the anatomy of the vagina — its structure, innervation, vascular and lymphatic supply.

Anatomical Position

The vagina is closely related to many of the organs in the pelvic region:

  • Anterior — bladder and urethra.
  • Posterior — rectouterine pouch, rectum and anal canal.
  • Lateral — ureters and levator ani muscle.

Anatomical Structure

The vagina is a fibromuscular tube with anterior and posterior walls — these are normally collapsed and thus in contact with one another.

The shape of the vagina is not a round tunnel. In the transverse plane it is more like an “H” lying on the side. At the upper ending, the vagina surrounds the cervix, creating two domes (fornices or vaults): an anterior and a (deeper) posterior one.

The posterior fornix is important as it acts like a natural reservoir for semen after intravaginal ejaculation. The semen retained in the fornix liquefies in the next 20-30 mins, allowing for easier permeation through the cervical canal.

Histology of the Vagina

The vagina is composed of four histological layers (internal to external):

  • Stratified squamous epithelium — this layer provides protection and is lubricated by cervical mucus (the vagina itself does not contain any glands).
  • Elastic lamina propria — a dense connective tissue layer which projects papillae into the overlying epithelium. The larger veins are located here.
  • Fibromuscular layer — comprising two layers of smooth muscle; an inner circular and an outer longitudinal layer.
  • Adventitia — a fibrous layer, which provides additional strength to the vagina whilst also binding it to surrounding structures.

Vascular Supply and Lymphatics

The arterial supply to the vagina is via the uterine and vaginal arteries — both branches of the internal iliac artery.

Venous return is by the vaginal venous plexus, which drains into the internal iliac veins via the uterine vein.

Lymphatic drainage is divided into three sections:

  • Superior — drains to external iliac nodes
  • Middle — drains to internal iliac nodes
  • Inferior — drains to superficial inguinal lymph nodes.

Innervation

Innervation is predominantly from the autonomic nervous system. Parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves arise from the uterovaginal nerve plexus (in turn a subsidiary of the inferior hypogastric plexus).

Only the inferior 1/5 of the vagina receives somatic innervation. This is via a branch of the pudendal nerve, the deep perineal nerve.

Clinical Relevance: Vaginal (Obstetric) Fistulae

A vaginal fistula is an open communication between the vagina and one of the adjacent pelvic organs.

It typically occurs as a result of prolonged labour (where a Caesarean section is not available). As the fetus slowly progresses down the vaginal wall, it exerts pressure — obstructing the blood supply and causing tissue necrosis.

There are three main types of vaginal fistulae:

  • Vesicovaginal — abnormal communication with the bladder. Urine enters the vagina.
  • Urethrovaginal — abnormal communication with the urethra. Urine only enters the vagina during urination.
  • Rectovaginal — abnormal communication with the rectum. Faecal matter can enter the vagina.

teachmeanatomy.info

Identifying Insect Eggs

Questions

Ask a Question Here are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

Question: Identifying Insect Eggs

Can you please tell me what type of insect eggs these are? I found them in the corners of my office kitchen. They are behind boxes and cardboard. I also found them in-between the broom bristles and along the edge of the wall. There are quite a few of them.
If you could please provide me some tips on how to avoid getting these eggs or killing off the main insect would be helpful.

Answers

To identify an egg is not that easy. However, there is a way to find out what the insect egg is.

Step 1
Take the eggs that you have gathered and put them in a plastic bag.

Step 2
Go to a pet exterminator company and show them the eggs.

Step 3
They will help you identify the eggs and the insect.

Step 4
Find out if you can take care of this at home on your own.

Step 5
You might need a professional to come in to spray for the insect and the eggs.

Question: Are These Insect Eggs?

I came home to my Florida wonder house and found this on the floor not near anything else. Any ideas?

Answers

These are not eggs from any insect. This is wood from a termite eating your home.

This looks like Frass from termites. the termites chew the wood and leave behind this type of crumbly mess of sawdust and termite excrement. You should get an exterminator ASAP . Good luck.

Question: Are These Insect Eggs?

I woke up this morning and found this black mass of I don’t know what on my bathroom wall, but it may be eggs of some kind of insect. Does anyone have any ideas?

Answers

Yikes! Looks like larvae. Get rid of it:

Step 1
Pour boiling water on them, gather the waste, and dispose of them far from your house

Step 2
Flush the drain with bleach and boiling water

Step 3
Deep clean your shower

See also:  Common Strawberry Pests, Entomology

Step 4
If you see any full grown after these steps, they can be eliminated with any commercial insect-killing spray.

Question: Identifying an Insect Egg

Does anyone know what type of egg this is? That’s my index finger as a size reference. It is flat now, and it feels a little bit like a spider’s web.

Answers

It looks like a dead silverfish.

Question: Identifying Insect Eggs

I found these in a room I was working on and I was curious to know what they are and if they are dangerous and what I should do from here.

Answers

These actually could be snake eggs from what I can read about them. A snake egg is an oblong shape and has a soft leathery texture to them.

They look like moth eggs. If the carpet is wool, holes will confirm. Vacuum them up, then toss the bag. That should eliminate the issue.

Question: Identifying Insect Eggs

Found these eggs on a piece of sleeper wood lying in the yard. Anyone know what they might be? When rubbing one a turquoise colour liquid came out. The eggs are copper metallic in colour.

Answers

Get rid of all wood lying in the yard. The egg can be one of many insects. Termites and powderpost beetles do a lot of damage.

They look like either squash bug eggs or stink bug eggs.

Best to scrape them off into a bucket with hot water and a little dish soap to kill them and then dispose of the water away from the house.

Stink bugs are a basically harmless nuisance where I am but squash bugs can kill plants in your garden.

Question: Unidentified Eggs On a Lily Plant

Anyone know what laid these eggs on my outdoor lily plant? I live in Florida. If it’s something beneficial, great. But if it’s not, I’d like to know before they hatch! If you «stretch» the pic you can see them pretty clearly. I will appreciate anyone’s help who may know. And if I should get rid of them will appreciate any good ideas how.
Thank you!

Answers

Take them to a garden shop to have them identified. Perhaps they are butterfly eggs, or some other beneficial insect. Enjoy

They may be root maggots. Check out this link and hold the example up to the stem. They look like they are white with a black tip like these pests.

If it isn’t a match, I would scrape some off carefully with a disposable plastic knife (leave outside in the trash when done) into a clean glass jar with a tighly sealed lid and inmedately take them to a garden center to help identify them. You may want to put the jar in a sealed plastic bag before transporting. I would not want to risk them being free in a car. Ick!!

It could be a lily leaf beetle.

I sent the photos to 3 entomologists. So far one has answered — doesn’t have any idea what they are. Sent photos to my Orkin guy too so will keep y’all posted if I get an answer!

DEFINITELY will seal anything I decide to carry them in — so far just waiting to get answers from 2 entomologists and my Orkin guy.

Checked out the root maggot possibility, and I don’t think there’s a match. When I looked into them it says they lay eggs on or under the soil, and the plant shows signs of distress. These are on the stem and leaf, and the plant appears to be perfectly healthy. Will keep this group posted if / when I learn more. I’m leaning toward some kind of fly or moth right now. Thanks though!

Let’s know. Glad it isn’t root maggots. They can be brutal to the plant.

Question: What Is on My Play Structure?

I have questions about 2 things (possibly unrelated?).

First there are small lines/grains of rice size things on a wooden play structure. Does anyone know what this is? They are small the size of grains of rice and only found in one or twos, but they are all over. Some are deep in the wood and some are laying right on top. Is this an insect egg? They don’t just flake off you have to dig them out. This is on a wooden playground and we live in New England. Are they larvae, termites, a powder post beetle? They are super small and thin and look like a grain of rice. They aren’t clustered together, more so of one here and there.

Secondly there are larger dots in a row — possibly related or unrelated- what are these lines of dots? Pollen collection from the rain where it drips or powder post beetle?

Are either of these of concern?

Question: Identifying Insect Egg Casings

I found this inside a bird box. It’s very fibrous and very strong. The photos aren’t great, but there are egg like casings and as you can see the box lid has been excavated somewhat and only shows a bit of the egg shells. Any ideas what they belong to?
Cheers.

Question: Identifying Insect Eggs

Do you know what this could it be, we found it on the bed one morning (on the top of the sheet underneath and underneath the first layer of the mattress? It looks like it drills small holes. It is the size of rice grains. Please help there is nothing similar on the internet.

Question: Identifying Insect Eggs

My vegetable plants have been very healthy overall and I check them every day for aphids, spider mites, etc. And out of nowhere one day one plant (broccoli I believe) had two or three of these little egg sacs? They look kind of like dead bits of a tapeworm parasite that has fallen off a dog or a cat. But they are stuck on the top of the leaf pretty tightly.

I’ve tried to look it up, but all the eggs look different with the bugs I’ve seen than the ones on my plant and are on the bottom of the leaf not the top. Could anyone please help me identify what these are? Also it started with just one or two and now there are a bunch, but not in clusters like most eggs.
*update * on one plant they finally started showing up on the underside of the leaf, but only on one leaf the rest are on the top.

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