Beware the dreaded horsefly: How to tell if you ve been bitten and how to treat painful bites — Wales Online

Beware the dreaded horsefly: How to tell if you’ve been bitten and how to treat painful bites

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Hot and humid weather attracts swarms of the troublesome insects

The heatwave conditions predicted to bathe much of the UK also attract a tiny creature that can have some very unpleasant consequences for those who may come into contact with it.

The recent humid weather has welcomed swarms of horseflies, which possess razor sharp teeth and a very painful bite.

Unfortunately, some people can also suffer an allergic reaction.

Unlike midge bites, which are mostly just an inconvenience, a horsefly bite can take much longer to recover from because they cut into the skin rather than pierce it, which can cause the wound to become infected.

A number of people have already reported being bitten by the flies over the past couple of weeks.

One person wrote on Twitter: «Saw the first horsefly of the summer and i still hate them.»

And another added: «It’s finally horsefly season those little vampires love taste of me.»

What are horseflies?

They’re large, dark-coloured flies which are around 1cm-2.5cm in size. They’re generally found near to cattle, horse stables, ponds, pools, woodlands, and grassy areas, hence the name.

The flies aren’t just into horses though, they’ll happily snack on any large warm-blooded mammal, including humans.

Only females bite because they need blood to produce eggs. They have jagged, saw-like teeth which slice open skin, then they release an anti-coagulant to stop the blood from clotting while they enjoy their meal.

How do I know if I’ve been bitten by a horsefly?

If you’re a little squeamish you might not want to see what a typical bite looks like, but there is a photo in the article below if you’re curious or worried.

First off, you’ll know about it pretty quickly. The bites are painful and itchy, reports the Manchester Evening News.

Horsefly bites can develop into large, red, itchy, swollen bumps within minutes. For most people they’re completely harmless, but they’re extremely uncomfortable.

Some people also report feeling hot, weak and nauseous.

An infected bite can result in redness, oozing, and extreme pain. Visit your GP if you’re suffering from an infection.

In exceptional cases some people can suffer an allergic reaction with symptoms including dizziness, wheezing, difficulty breathing, a blotchy skin rash and severe swelling that may be visible in your lips or tongue.

If you suffer any of these reactions, seek medical help immediately.

What should I do if I am bitten?

It’s important to keep the bite clean because if bacteria gets into the skin it can become infected. In very rare cases it can cause cellulitis, an infection of the soft tissues. It’s best to clean the wound with an antiseptic soap and warm water.

Apply an ice pack to help soothe the area and stop the itching.

Doctors normally recommend using an over-the-counter steroid cream containing hydrocortisone. Ibuprofen gel can also help ease any pain and swelling.

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You might be interested in.

And it goes without saying that you should avoid scratching the bite. It won’t stop the itching and could damage the skin, increasing the risk of developing an infection.

Official NHS says: «A bite from a horsefly can be very painful and the bitten area of skin will usually be red and raised.

«Horsefly bites can take a while to heal and can become infected. See your GP if you have symptoms of an infection, such as pus or increasing pain, redness and swelling.»

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How to treat horsefly bites as we hit peak insect season

Itching, pain and infections are among the dangers posed by a bite — but there are products out there to help

Horseflies are coming — and their nasty bites are set to be a summer hazard for many people.

Those who are allergic to the bites can suffer extreme reactions to the insects, while some could be at risk of infection from the summer pest.

For most people the bite is harmless but very uncomfortable and definitely unsightly. Luckily there is some advice for those who have been bitten.

Keeping the bite clean with antiseptic soap and warm water and applying an ice pack should help. To ease the pain further we have asked the experts what products they recommend to battle the bites.

Always visit your GP or local pharmacy for a professional opinion before using these products. Do not use multiple treatments without consulting your GP first.

For itching

Hydrocortisone cream

Hydrocortisone cream is a treatment for Eczema, Dematitis and insect bites. It’s an over-the-counter cream that should ease itching and pain for minor bites.

However, the steroid cream should not be used on the face as it can make some conditions as acne and impetigo worse. If the bite is on your face visit your GP first.

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Antihistamines

Antihistamines are used for a number of things including allergies such as hayfever and conjunctivitis. It can also be used to treat insect bites if there is an allergic response.

Usually taken in the form of tablets, they can help with allergy relief. Brands such as Benadryl are some of the better known antisitamine options.

There is currently a sale on antihistamines at online pharmacy Chemist 4 U , with up to 25% off Benadryl products.

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Crotamiton

Crotamiton is an ingredient in E45 cream, which is particularly effective on itchy skin and mosquito bites.

It can be used for mild horsefly bites and is available from all chemists and supermarkets at affordable prices. Boots currently has a selection of E45 products available online.

Pain relief

Paracetamol

The experts at the NHS say paracetamol can be used to help with pain and discomfort related to a horsefly bite. Paracetamol is available in any chemist or supermarket and is over-the-counter so you won’t need a prescription.

Note children under 16 years of age should not be given aspirin.

Ibuprofen

Ibuprofen, like paracetamol, can be used to help with pain or discomfort from an insect bite.

You can get Ibuprofen gel over the counter to apply to the affected area. Boots currently has a max-strength 10% gel for £5.99 or as part of its 2 for £8 deal on pain relief products.

www.liverpoolecho.co.uk

The best remedies for horsefly bites revealed

The pesky insects can cause people a lot of discomfort

  • 17:18, 4 JUL 2018
  • Updated 12:18, 6 JUL 2018

They are thriving in the hot weather, causing discomfort to thousands across the UK.

Growing numbers of horseflies are one of the few negatives of the summer spell, as their bites often need treatment.

The blood-suckers have even put people in hospital for allergic reactions.

See also:  Why Are Mosquitoes So Dangerous, Passport Health

However, to most, they are just a pain.

As the hot weather continues, the levels of horseflies will become comparable to those found in Eastern European and parts of the Mediterranean, it has been reported.

Victims should keep the bite clean with antiseptic soap and warm water and apply an ice pack if possible.

Read More
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Creams and pain relief to help

Antihistamines

Used to treat insect bites if there is an allergic response, they are usually taken in the form of tablets, says the Daily Post.

Used for a number of things including allergies such as hayfever and conjunctivitis, brands such as Benadryl are are popular with sufferers.

Hydrocortisone cream

An over-the-counter cream that should ease itching and pain for minor bites. Hydrocortisone cream is a treatment for Eczema and Dermatitis too.

However, it should not be used on the face as it can make some conditions as acne and impetigo worse. Your doctor should be consulted in such cases.

Read More
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Paracetamol

The most common form of pain relief is available in any chemist or supermarket without a prescription.

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Do not that children under 16 years of age should not be given aspirin.

Ibuprofen

Similar to the above, in tablet form or a gel.

Boots has a max-strength 10 per cent gel for £5.99 or as part of its 2 for £8 deal on pain relief products. Simply apply it to the affected area.

www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk

What is a horsefly, how do you treat a bite, what do horseflies look like and how common are they in the UK?

People have been sharing shocking pictures of pus-filled bites

  • 10 Jul 2018, 14:40
  • Updated : 10 Jul 2018, 16:00

PEOPLE have been sharing shocking pictures of pus-filled horsefly bites, but what are the pests and how can you stay safe.

Here’s everything you need to know.

What is a horsefly?

The horsefly is a large, hairy fly whose bite can be extremely painful.

The females will bite animals — including humans — for blood, which they need to produce eggs.

The female flies have two razor sharp cutting blades that pierce the skin.

The pests then use a sponge-like part of their mouths to lap up blood.

Male flies do not bite instead drinking nectar from flowers or fruit.

What do horseflies look like?

Horseflies are much larger than an average fly.

They are dark, hairy flies although they may also have brightly coloured patches.

The pests measure about 1cm to 2.5cm in size.

How do you treat a bite?

A bite from a horsefly can be very painful.

The bites are not generally harmful, although there is a risk of infection and people have been sharing shocking pictures of their reactions.

Bites can take a while to heal and symptoms can include a large rash, dizziness, weakness, wheezing and swelling.

The NHS advises:

  • Clean the area
  • Apply a cold compress
  • Keep the wound covered to prevent infection
  • Elevate the affected area to reduce swelling
  • Do not scratch

You should contact your GP or NHS 111 if:

  • The symptoms do not improve within a few days
  • You’re stung around your mouth, throat or eyes
  • An area of 10cm or more becomes swollen and red
  • The wound becomes infected
  • You have a fever, swollen glands or flu-like symptoms

You should dial 999 if:

  • You are wheezing or having difficulty breathing
  • You have a swollen mouth, throat or face
  • You are nauseous or vomiting
  • Your heart rate increases
  • You feel dizzy or faint
  • You have difficulty swallowing
  • You lose consciousness

How can I protect myself?

Some insect repellents will help keep the horseflies at bay and it’s a good idea to protect yourself if you’re going near grassland, livestock or water.

Light coloured clothing will also make you less of a target for the flies, which are attracted to dark, moving objects.

The flies like hot weather and don’t normally head into dark areas — so you will be better protected in the shade.

How common are they in the UK

Horseflies like warm weather and as summers get hotter Brits can expect to see more.

The flies normally appear in June and July.

Horseflies are often found around ponds, pools, woodlands, grass and livestock.

www.thesun.co.uk

How to spot a horsefly and what you should do if one bites you

People have been warned about the large, blood-thirsty insect which is thriving in warm weather

  • 11:14, 25 JUL 2017
  • Updated 16:11, 25 JUL 2017

People have been warned about a large, blood-thirsty insect which is thriving in warm weather.

Horseflies are constant pest in warm weather and some people are suffering extreme allergic reactions from their bites.

Read More
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That’s because horseflies, also known as clegs, have razor sharp jaws which sink into the skin rather than pierce it, which can cause the wound to become infected.

People have been warned to be on the look-out for horseflies, as the MEN has reported, so here is how to spot them.

How to spot a horsefly

Be on the look-out for large, dark-coloured flies around 1cm to 2.5cam in size. Horseflies are often found in or near ponds, pools, woodlands, grassy areas, cattle and horse stables.

Read More
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If you are attacked by a horsefly it will be a female which bites you, because they need blood to produce eggs. Their jagged teeth slice open the skin then release an anti-coagulant to stop the blood from clotting while they enjoy their meal.

What does a bite look like?

Horsefly bites start painful and itchy, and develop into large, red, itchy, swollen bumps within minutes. If it gets infected it can cause redness, oozing and extreme pain.

But for most, horsefly bites are completely harmless, if very uncomfortable.

How should I treat a horsefly bite?

If you suffer an allergic reaction and feel hot, weak, nauseous or dizzy or have difficulty breathing you should see your GP ASAP.

Also seek medical advice immediately if you have a blotchy skin rash and severe swelling that may be visible in your lips or tongue.

Read More
Related Articles

To avoid infection it’s important to keep the bite clean with an antiseptic soap and warm water. In very rare cases it can cause cellulitis.

Use an ice pack to stop any swelling and soothe the itching. Resist the urge to scratch the wound too as this could break the skin and lead to infection.

Doctors normally recommend using an over-the-counter steroid cream containing hydrocortisone. Ibuprofen gel can also help ease any pain and swelling.

www.gloucestershirelive.co.uk

Where to find horseflies, how you know you’ve been bitten and what to do if it happens

The female horsefly feeds off blood so they can produce eggs — and they’re happy to bite humans and dogs

  • 09:35, 27 JUN 2018
  • Updated 19:59, 28 JUN 2018

The sunny spell is set to continue so many will be heading out and about to soak up some rays or make the most of the longer days.

Trips out sound ideal in your head, but there are little beasts in skies which carry a bite.

While midges are annoying and get most of the bad press, it’s horse flies which you really want to be aware of.

According to the Northumberland Wildlife Trust, you’ll find horseflies between May and September, which means we’re right at the peak of horsefly season.

Also known as clegs, the flies mostly live around long grassland and damp woodland, and like to bite cows and horses to feed off their blood. But they’re quite happy to go for humans and dogs too.

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What are horseflies and where do you find them?

Horseflies are large, dark-coloured flies measuring between 1cm to 2.5c. As their name suggests, they like to feed off horses, so you’ll find clusters of them near stables and grazing fields. Cows are another favourite source of blood for horseflies, although any large mammal will do them — including humans and dogs.

You’ll also find horse flies around water pools, woodlands, meadows and grassy fields. Any where it’s nice to spend a sunny day, really.

Why do they bite?

The female flies need to feed off blood so they can produce eggs. Their jagged teeth slice open skin, while the flies also release an anti-cougulant to stop the blood from clotting while they eat.

The male flies feed off nectar.

Read More
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How do I know If I’ve been bitten by a horsefly?

It’ll hurt, for starters, then your skin will turn red around the bite area.

According to the NHS, you may also get a rash, feel dizzy or feel weak. Some people also start wheezing.

What should I do if I get bitten?

Keep the wound clean with antiseptic soap and warm water to avoid it becoming infected. Other than that, you won’t usually have to do anything.

However, if you do show symptoms of an infection, such as such as pus or increasing pain, redness and swelling, then contact your GP.

In rare cases, some people suffer allergic reactions. Symptoms include dizziness, wheezing, difficulty breathing, a blotchy skin rash and severe swelling that may be visible in your lips or tongue. If this happens to you, seek immediate medical help.

See also:  Skin lesions in humans bitten by European pigeon tick Argas reflexus (Fab

And avoid scratching the bite! It won’t stop the itching and can increase the likelihood of an infection.

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Essential creepy-crawly info

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Horsefly bite treatments, how to avoid clegs and how to tell if you’ve been bitten

Horseflies can leave a nasty bite

  • 10:15, 26 JUN 2019
  • Updated 10:17, 26 JUN 2019

Who isn’t a fan of summer?!

Packed with trips to nearby beaches, long walks in the country, staying out in the sun too long and of course regular barbecues, it is the season for getting outside and making the most of the warmer weather and longer nights.

However, it’s not just us humans who tend to bloom in the soaring temperatures. When the sun comes out so do a whole host of creepy crawlies, animals and insects — and not all of them are as friendly as we’d hope.

Indeed some of them could turn your holiday heaven into a nightmare.

You have probably heard about horseflies — or «clegs» as some people know them as. They are insects which are commonplace in the countryside during the summer months.

What you may not know, however, is that they have razor sharp jaws which you will certainly know about if you have ever been unlucky enough to get bitten.

What makes them so unusual is that unlike midge bites they cut into the skin rather than pierce it and it can cause some extreme reactions in people in some cases.

What are horseflies?

Horseflies are large, dark-coloured flies which are around 1cm to 2.5cm in size. They are generally found near to cattle, horse stables, ponds, pools, woodlands, and grassy areas.

Only females bite because they need blood to produce eggs. They have jagged teeth which slice open skin and release an anti-coagulant to stop the blood from clotting.

How do I know if I’ve been bitten by a horsefly?

First off, you’ll know about it pretty quickly. The bites are painful and itchy.

Horsefly bites develop into large, red, itchy, swollen bumps within minutes. For most people they’re completely harmless, but they’re extremely uncomfortable.

Read More
Related Articles

Some people also report feeling hot, weak, nauseous or dizzy.

An infected bite can result in redness, oozing, and extreme pain. Visit your GP if you’re suffering from an infection.

Read More
Related Articles

In exceptional cases some people can suffer an allergic reaction with symptoms including dizziness, wheezing, difficulty breathing, a blotchy skin rash and severe swelling that may be visible in your lips or tongue.

If you suffer any of these reactions, seek medical help immediately.

What can I do to horsefly bites?

These flies are not especially affected by insect repellent and the best way to prevent being bitten is covering up and keeping windows closed.

What should I do if a horsefly bites me?

It’s important to keep the bite clean because if bacteria gets into the skin it can become infected. In very rare cases it can cause cellulitis, an infection of the soft tissues. It’s best to clean the wound with an antiseptic soap and warm water.

Apply an ice pack to help soothe the area and stop the itching.

Read More
Related Articles

Doctors normally recommend using an over-the-counter steroid cream containing hydrocortisone. Ibuprofen gel can also help ease any pain and swelling, the Manchester Evening News reports.

And it goes without saying that you should avoid scratching the bite. It won’t stop the itching and could damage the skin, increasing the risk of developing an infection.

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How to Get Rid of Horseflies Around the Swimming Pool

So, you’ve built a pool just in time for summer. But when you try to use it, you are assaulted by large, biting, seemingly indestructible flies.

You try hiding underwater, but they just wait patiently above the water, biding their time until you resurface so that they can hurtle themselves towards you. What are these monsters? What do they want from us? And how can we get rid of them? These monstrosities are horseflies, more commonly known as “clegs” and, as anyone from a rural area will tell you, they are made purely of nightmares.

Table of Contents

Breaking news: Blood-sucking horseflies terrorise the UK!

The recent rise in temperatures has provoked an infestation of blood-sucking horseflies, typically only seen in the Mediterranean region. Multiple news outlets like The Sun , Daily Mail , Police Hour , Independent , and others warn that the flying insects may cause serious diseases.

  • “BUZZ OFF Plague of vampire horseflies threatens to spread nasty infections via gruesome bites, Brits warned” –
  • “Warning issued to Brits after heatwave attracts insects” –
  • “Families warned to drain paddling pools to stop vampire horseflies breeding after heatwave” –
  • “Horsefly bites: Drain paddling pools to stop biting insects breeding, say experts as reports soar” –

The bug is easily identified because of its visibly bigger size. Unlike the common household fly, it has large, widespread eyes and huge wings. Another big difference between the two types of pest, is that the horsefly has very distinct stout piercing mouthparts and an excruciatingly painful bite.

The female vampire insect feeds of blood, so it can produce millions of eggs. The horsefly uses its serrated mandibles to dig into the skin of mammals, creating a sore wound and pumping it with venom. This can lead to extremely painful infections and swelling that may not be cured with modern antibiotics.

The NHS advises that you see your GP immediately if an insect bite results in the described symptoms. If ignored, it may cause serious scarring from the developed blisters. Limb amputation and death cases have been recorded in the past.

What are Horseflies

Horseflies are large, darkly-coloured flies with visible compound eyes and can range in size from 1cm to 2.5cm. They are most commonly found near horse stables, cattle, standing water, such as ponds and pools, slow-moving streams and rivers, and long damp grass.

As highly adapted visual hunters, they are attracted to large dark objects, movement, and carbon dioxide, all of which are traits found in warm-blooded mammals.

Do horseflies bite?

Yes. And the bites are terrible. Despite being famous for plaguing horses and livestock, horseflies will attempt to bite any large, warm-blooded mammal. However, only females are able to bite as they require blood to produce their eggs, unlike males who only consume pollen and nectar. If you are bitten by a horsefly, you will know about it very quickly as the bite can be incredibly painful. This is due to the gruesome way in which horseflies bite.

Female horseflies are equipped with a pair of saw-like mandibles, which are used to rip and slice open skin. Once a wound is opened, they release an anti-coagulant to stop the blood from clotting. As soon as a hole is ripped open, they begin lapping up that sweet, sweet mammal blood.

Can you get an allergic reaction to a horsefly bite?

Horsefly bites are easily recognisable as they differ from other insect bites. They are painful, itchy, and surrounded by red, swollen skin. As the bites are not puncture wounds, they also take longer to heal and are more likely to become infected. Severe allergic reactions to horsefly bites are rare, but should any of the following symptoms appear, you should contact a medical professional immediately:

  • Dizziness or weakness;
  • Wheezing;
  • Redness and swelling around the eyes and lips;
  • Swelling of the face, lips, hands, and feet;
  • Tongue and throat swelling;
  • Nausea, vomiting, or diarrhoea;
  • Difficulty swallowing or breathing.

What Attracts Horseflies?

Light & Sunshine

So why are horseflies frequent visitors to your outside pool? It’s not because their butterfly skills (pun not intended) are rusty. It’s more because these species are especially attracted to light reflections. This makes your pool a natural habitat for horseflies.

See also:  Lice vs

Food Sources (Blood & Nectar)

Even though both female and male flies snack on flower juice, the female horsefly is the one that needs additional elements in its diet for its eggs, and that is blood.

Carbon Dioxide

Another attractor to horseflies is the CO2 that you and every other mammal on Earth breathe out. Horsefly organisms have developed natural ways to track down carbon dioxide that unsuspecting targets emit.

Things That Move

Horseflies are known to chase moving, dark-coloured items. So, if you are passing by a horsefly-infested area on a hot day, you might want to wear bright clothes.

How to get rid of horseflies around the swimming pool?

Although they are aggressive spoilers of fun, you don’t have to let horseflies ruin your enjoyment of the pool. Here are some methods you can use to get rid of the hellspawns that are horseflies.

  • Sticky fly paper. Unravel and hang fly paper around the pool area. These hanging strips will attract and trap horseflies, as well as other flying pests. Replace them as needed or when the paper starts to get crowded. Also, try not to walk into them. It is a disgusting experience, trust us.
  • Pesticides. Spray the pool area and your immediate vicinity with natural pesticides that contain pyrethroids. These pesticides are made from dried chrysanthemum plants and are safe for use around children and pets. For other areas of your garden, alternate between using organophosphate and organochlorine-based pesticides to ensure that the horseflies won’t develop a tolerance to a specific type of pesticide.
  • Light traps. The light given out by these traps was specifically developed to attract many types of flying pests. As soon as they come into contact with the light, they become zapped and, in most cases, instantly killed. Place one or more of these traps around the pool area to quickly kill the horseflies. Since they are powered by electricity, remember to place them out of reach to prevent them from getting splashed.
  • Bag traps. These types of traps are made up of two elements: a bag holding fly food that attract flies, and a funnel which allows entry, but stops flies from leaving. This trap appears to be one of the most effective ways to get rid of horseflies. However, the smell of fly food and trapped flies is quite pungent and overpowering. It is best to place one or more of these traps at a good distance away from the pool or any other areas where people congregate. Don’t worry about its effectiveness, though – horseflies cannot resist the bait.
  • Horsefly traps. These are large, hanging traps with moving parts designed specifically to attract horseflies. By the time they realise that what they’ve landed on is not their prey, they will become trapped between the parts and killed by the heat of the sun-warmed metal. Hang this type of trap in an area that is exposed to a lot of sunlight during the day for maximum effect.

How to prevent horseflies from invading?

When it comes to horseflies, prevention is just as important as getting rid of them. Try putting these methods into practice to stop horseflies from encroaching on your summer fun.

Mow your lawn and weed regularly

Horseflies love long damp grass and weeds as this environment provides them with the perfect breeding ground and acts as a cool refuge during the hottest part of the day. Keeping your grass short and your garden weed-free deprives horseflies of their favoured summer retreats. This will reduce the number of little beasts that visit your garden and pool.

Burn citronella candles and lamps around the pool area

Citrus smells repel many types of biting insects, and those few intrepid insects which brave the citrus area will find their senses dulled and will have a harder time landing on you.

Keep the pool area free of food and trash

Almost all flies are attracted to food and trash, so make sure to maintain a clean pool area and keep bins as far away from the pool as possible.

Cover your pool

Keep your pool covered for as long as possible during the months of June, July, and August as these are the months during which horseflies are most active. You can still use the pool, just remember to cover it when you are finished partying.

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How to treat a horsefly bite?

Suffering from bug or horse fly bites?
Here’s all you need to know about how to treat and avoid them:#horseflies #summer #insects pic.twitter.com/lg3nnh99qw

Treating a horsefly bite is fairly simple and is similar to treating other insect bites. If you are bitten, you should:

  • Clean the wound with plain warm water and a cotton cloth or cotton wool;
  • Apply a cold compress to the area for 10 to 15 minutes to reduce the swelling;
  • Do not scratch the bite as it could make the wound worse or lead to an infection.

Remedies, such as vinegar or sodium bicarbonate are not recommended as they won’t really help. It is also worth remembering that a horsefly will not leave any part of itself (stinger, mandibles) behind in the wound. Some over-the-counter treatments which can prove useful include:

  • Paracetamol or ibuprofen – take any of these if the pain from the bite is too overwhelming;
  • Crotamiton cream, hydrocortisone cream or antihistamine tablets – will help you fight the unbearable need to scratch the wound;
  • Antihistamine tablets – sometimes ice packs aren’t enough. If that happens, go with these tablets.

Due to the way horseflies bite, the wounds are more prone to infection than with other insect bites. During the healing process, you should be wary of an infection, so keep the wound clean and resist the urge to scratch it. Signs of infection to look for are:

  • The skin around the bite becoming redder;
  • Increased swelling and pain;
  • Pus or other discharge.

If any of the above symptoms appear, you should visit your doctor for further advice and treatment as antibiotics may be needed.

Frequently Asked Questions About Horseflies:

What is the scientific name of a horsefly?

In the scientific world, the horsefly is also known as Tabanus Sulcifrons. Acourding to Wikipedia, it belongs in the Tabanidae family, insect order Diptera.

What is another word for a horsefly?

The horsefly or horse-fly, as you might find stylized on other sites, is also called: breeze fly, stout, cleg or gadfly. The word gad means a sharp pointed object, and was given to the fly by the country folk. They didn’t distinguish between different insect bites and so, this word is general for all biting insects.

What is the life cycle of a horsefly?

Each fly, regardless of its type has 4 life cycles: egg, larva, pupa and adult. Horseflies, in particular, have an adult lifespan anywhere from 30 to 60 days. Their entire life time expectancy from egg to the final stage ranges between 1 and 3 years.

What is the purpose of the horsefly in its natural ecosystem?

The purpose of horseflies is to breed and serve as food mainly for other insects and birds. Adult horseflies feed on nectar, so occasionally, they pollinate flowers. However, only females suck on blood. The proteins and salt contained in blood help horseflies produce more eggs. If your real questions was, “What are horseflies useful for anything that benefits humans?”, then apart from pollination, the answer is “no, for nothing, really”.

What is the speed of a horsefly?

An adult horsefly can reach a maximum speed of more than 140 km/h which is almost 87 mph, while for a period of up to 6 hours, 20 to 30 flies can suck up to 200 milliliters of blood from their prey.

What time do horse flies come out?

Horse flies tend to appear for 2 months, July and August.

Do horseflies come out in the rain?

Although no scientific proof, rumors have it that horse flies appear during and after rainfall.

Do horseflies come out at night?

Their love for sunshine is why you won’t see much of horsefly activity after dark – horse flies actually do not come out at night.

Are horseflies territorial?

Horseflies seem to be extremely territorial. Once you manage to get rid of one already in your property, others won’t rush in to take its place.

When do horseflies go away?

Horseflies are particularly frequent during summertime and periods of high heat. Towards the beginning of autumn (Mid-September – October) they gradually hide away, and are completely gone when it gets colder.

Now that you know how to identify, remove, and repel horseflies, just remember to keep your lawn properly maintained, invest in some fly traps and citronella tiki lamps. Otherwise, just invest in a pest control professional, and you will be on your way to a bite-free summer.

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www.fantasticpestcontrol.co.uk

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