Asian Cockroach Facts — Control: Get Rid of Asian Roaches

Asian Cockroaches

Facts, Identification and Control

Latin Name

Appearance

Asian cockroaches appear identical to German cockroaches.

  • Length: Asian cockroach adults are about 13 to 16 mm long.
  • Color: They are light brown and have two parallel lines behind their head on the pronotum.

How Did I Get Asian Cockroaches?

Asian cockroaches are strong fliers. These pests prefer to live outside, but they can enter homes by accident through open doors, windows, and poorly fitted seals. Attracted to light, they may fly towards bright entryways and porch lights.

Outdoors, populations living in leaf litter and mulch may grow into the thousands. As a result, people with an Asian cockroach infestation in the yard are more likely to start noticing the insects in the house. Uncovered trashcans and pet food or dirty dishes may draw them indoors, as well.

How Serious Are Asian Cockroaches?

Asian cockroaches may carry disease-causing microorganisms on their bodies. When they walk over pantry goods, counters, and cooking utensils, these pathogens could spread.

Asian cockroach waste and body oils may also make the flavor and smell of food unpleasant. In addition, these pests might also trigger allergic reactions in some people.

How Do I Get Rid of Asian Cockroaches?

Cockroach populations multiply quickly and are difficult to eradicate without professional help. Contact your local pest control professional to discuss treatment options.

DIY Prevention

If you notice an Asian cockroach inside your home, the use of screens may be effective in preventing further infestation.

Behavior, Diet & Habits

Like other species, the Asian cockroach is omnivorous and feeds on any available food source. They have been known to carry germs and can spread diseases to humans. Asian cockroaches are prolific breeders and reach peak populations in spring and summer.

Geographic Range

As its name suggests, the Asian cockroach is most commonly found in Southeast Asia. However, the pest has spread significantly and is now known to infiltrate houses worldwide. First documented in the United States in the 1980s, they have since spread through most of the Southeastern United States.

Where Do They Live?

Asian cockroaches are typically located in shaded, moist areas. While they are more likely to infest outdoor areas, they do sometimes enter homes. The pests are most active at dusk and fly long distances toward sources of light. You may see these insects attracted to your television screen or perched near lamps and other sources of illumination.

Asian Roaches vs. German Roaches

The best way to distinguish Asian cockroaches from German cockroaches is through their behaviors. Use these three behaviors to tell them apart:

  • Do they fly? — Asian cockroaches are capable flyers, while German cockroaches are not.
  • Are they attracted to light? — The most significant attractant is light. Therefore, If you see a cockroach that looks like the more familiar German cockroach, but doesn’t seem to be alarmed and scurry away when the lights are turned on, that cockroach is very likely an Asian cockroach.
  • Where did you find them? — Asian cockroaches live primarily outdoors, while German cockroaches tend to infest human dwellings.

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Cockroach Images and Identification — FAQs

Are you worried your home may have cockroaches? Take a look at a few cockroach pictures to help you identify whatever culprit may be hiding in your home.

Worried you might have a cockroach problem on your hands? These pictures of cockroaches will help you pick the bad guys out of a lineup so pest management professionals can start handing out sentences without the possibility of parole.

Do all cockroaches look alike?

No. All cockroaches are similar, but not identical. As you can see in Fig. 1, there are different types and sizes of cockroaches. Each species is identifiable by its distinct features, but it’s not always an easy task. Moreover, young roaches often look quite different from their adult counterparts in both size and appearance.

Identifying the types of cockroaches in your home is important because it dictates the best methods for getting rid of them.

How can I tell cockroaches apart?

Here’s how it’s done: find the Australian cockroach in Fig. 1. It has a black shape on its pronotum (the shield-shaped plate behind its head) that’s encircled by a yellow band.

Next, try identifying the smoky brown cockroach. It has a mahogany-brown pronotum and its wings are slightly longer than its body. Think you got it?

Starting with the cockroach on the dime (did you even see that one?) and working clockwise, the pictures in Fig. 1 are of the Asian cockroach, Florida woods cockroach, brown-banded cockroach, Australian cockroach, smoky brown cockroach and Surinam cockroach.

How did you do? Don’t worry about it. That’s why reputable pest management professionals offer a free home pest inspection: to make your life easier.

Why don’t these pictures of cockroaches really help?

Cockroaches are fast and really good at hiding. The telltale long antennae, flat bodies, six hairy legs, downward facing head, shield-like pronotum, and two forewings and hindwings you see in these pictures can be difficult to make out in real time.

Trying to spot tiny differences between similar species as they scurry into cracks and crevices can be nearly impossible to the untrained eye. While it may be tempting to step on the roach, this makes it even harder to identify afterward.

See also:  How I Got Rid of Cockroaches in My Apartment - Wipe Out Cockroaches

Is there any specific type of cockroach I should really look out for?

Take a look at Fig. 2. These cockroach images depict the most common household varieties in the United States: the German cockroach.

At the left is an ootheca (top) and nymph (bottom). A German cockroach ootheca can hold 20 to 40 eggs. These eggs hatch nymphs, which grow into adult males (center) and females (right).

If you see any of the depicted, it’s a sure sign you have cockroaches in your home. To get rid of an infestation, German cockroaches in each life cycle stage must be accounted for.

If you think you’ve seen one of these suspects lurking around your home, don’t waste time searching through pictures of cockroaches like mugshots at a police station. Call Terminix® right away and restore order in your home.

Do Earwigs Bite?

If you shudder a little when you think about earwigs, you’re probably not alone. They’ve developed quite a nasty reputation, thanks to urban legends (mostly false) that have been circulating for years. But are they harmful?

The Lifespans of Insects With Short Lives

Many insects, such as butterflies, have a lifespan that occurs in four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Other insects, such as grasshoppers, do not have a pupal stage and instead go through three stages: egg, nymph, and adult. The length of each stage can vary based on many things, from the insect species to the temperature outside—but what some insects share in common is a very short adult stage. Keep reading to learn about five insects with some of the shortest adult stages in their lifespan.

The Return of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

The change of seasons from summer to fall means many things: leaves changing colors, dropping temperatures, and—depending on where you live—stink bugs sneaking into your home. Stink bugs were named for their distinct ability to emit an unpleasant odor when they are threatened or disturbed by predators like lizards or birds. This also means that if stink bugs enter your home and feel threatened, you’ll be faced with dealing with their strong smell in your house. As we head into fall, you might find yourself with more active stink bugs than usual, so it’s important to know the basics about these smelly insects.

What are Earwigs?

Most people have probably heard of earwigs at some point or another. These creepy-looking insects are associated with some urban myths. Learn the truth about earwigs, including what attracts them and how to help get rid of them.

ARE TICKS DANGEROUS?

The majority of ticks will deliver painless bites without any noticeable symptoms. However, some ticks can carry a variety of bacteria and pathogens for disease. Although not all ticks are dangerous, you don’t want to risk coming into contact with these blood-sucking insects.

ARE TICKS DANGEROUS?

The majority of ticks will deliver painless bites without any noticeable symptoms. However, some ticks can carry a variety of bacteria and pathogens for disease. Although not all ticks are dangerous, you don’t want to risk coming into contact with these blood-sucking insects.

Are Bed Bugs Contagious?

Bed bugs are not too picky about where and when they catch a ride and don’t necessarily have a preferred mode of transportation, so it’s no surprise how many people wonder, are bed bugs contagious?

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Do Earwigs Bite?

If you shudder a little when you think about earwigs, you’re probably not alone. They’ve developed quite a nasty reputation, thanks to urban legends (mostly false) that have been circulating for years. But are they harmful?

Cluster Flies In Your Home

If you’re like many homeowners, you’ve dealt with annoying flies ruining your summer barbecues and outdoor dinner parties. You may have even become accustomed to whipping out the flypaper and heavy-duty bug zappers the minute you hear the familiar buzz of a fly. These annoying pests are likely house flies, which can pose significant health risks to you and your family. But have you ever seen large, sluggish flies loitering inside your home in the autumn and winter? They may be cluster flies.

Tips to Get Rid of Stink Bugs in Your House

Now that it’s fall, it’s officially indoor stink bug season. Before it becomes winter, brown marmorated stink bugs are looking for comfortable overwintering sites to spend the cold months—and that can often mean that they may find a way to sneak into your house. While the odor that a stink bug releases is not dangerous, they are definitely a nuisance. Luckily, there are steps you can take to get rid of stink bugs in your house—without having to deal with the unpleasant smell.

What are Sand Fleas?

Many people love going to the beach to spend time in the sun, sand, and water. But they might not love some of the nuisances that live at the beach or in the ocean, such as gnats or jellyfish. But, what about the sand flea, a small critter that can be found in moist areas such as under rocks or debris. Keep reading to learn exactly what sand fleas are and if you need to worry about them.

The Lifespans of Insects With Short Lives

Many insects, such as butterflies, have a lifespan that occurs in four stages: egg, larva, pupa, and adult. Other insects, such as grasshoppers, do not have a pupal stage and instead go through three stages: egg, nymph, and adult. The length of each stage can vary based on many things, from the insect species to the temperature outside—but what some insects share in common is a very short adult stage. Keep reading to learn about five insects with some of the shortest adult stages in their lifespan.

The Return of the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug

The change of seasons from summer to fall means many things: leaves changing colors, dropping temperatures, and—depending on where you live—stink bugs sneaking into your home. Stink bugs were named for their distinct ability to emit an unpleasant odor when they are threatened or disturbed by predators like lizards or birds. This also means that if stink bugs enter your home and feel threatened, you’ll be faced with dealing with their strong smell in your house. As we head into fall, you might find yourself with more active stink bugs than usual, so it’s important to know the basics about these smelly insects.

See also:  National Infection Prevention and Control Manual: A-Z Pathogens

www.terminix.com

Are Roaches Blind?

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When exercising the most time-honored strategy for controlling cockroaches — smacking them with a shoe or rolled newspaper — you’re convinced they’re psychic. They seem capable of interpreting your movements as they successfully avoid your efforts to flatten their flat bodies. These insects have anatomy designed for success, and that includes their vision. They not only have eyes, but they have simple and compound eyes that provide a nearly 360-degree field of vision that includes you and your swatting shoe.

Roach Eyes

Roaches have two types of eyes: simple and compound. The smaller, simple eyes detect dark and light while the considerably larger compound eyes wrap around the head, allowing them to see attacks from all sides. Unlike human eyes that see color, shape and fine details with single lenses, the compound eyes of cockroaches consist of more than 2,000 individual lenses. They are sensitive to daylight, they don’t like red light and prefer to be active in the dark.

Multiple Lenses

Children familiar with bug-eye lenses have experienced looking at the world through 24 to 48 tiny hexagonal lenses at once. Each individual lens captures a slightly different image from the surrounding space. While disorienting to humans, cockroaches rely upon the different images. Madagascar hissing cockroaches have up to 2,500 hexagonal lenses in each compound eye, guaranteeing them both exceptional vision and an excellent awareness of what is happening around them.

Wrapped Eyes

Compound eyes of cockroaches wrap around the side of their heads distributing the lenses laterally making it possible to see motion from nearly all sides of their bodies at the same time without turning their heads. Cockroach heads are flat and the eyes wrap on the top as well as the sides, giving them a full view of potential predators.

More Than the Eyes

In addition to cockroach vision, their bodies rely upon a wide range of senses for survival, locating food and tracking pheromone scents. The six legs of cockroaches have organs that work in conjunction with the antennae to heighten their sense of touch, pressure changes and smell. Two fine hair-like adaptations on the rear portion of their abdomens, called cerci, act to sense slight breezes or vibrations. It’s no wonder that cockroaches can quickly detect the presence of humans and other predators in time to escape harm.

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12 Types of Editors and What They Do

12 Types of Editors and What They Do

What Are the Different Types of Editors?

Selecting the right editor for your project depends on your needs and, sometimes, your budget. You’ll want to familiarize yourself with the different roles editors can play in getting an article or a book published.

1. Beta Reader

Beta readers are generally those people you let look over your writing to get their opinion. Many authors may ask for beta readers and create a questionnaire for the readers to get early feedback on a story. You want to find beta readers if you are an author looking for feedback from the general public for your work.

2. Proofreader

Proofreaders look over content after it has gone through other stages of editing. Proofreaders often only look for glaring mistakes in grammar and punctuation, and they may give little feedback as to quality or content development. You want to hire a proofreader if you are concerned about spelling, punctuation or grammar mistakes, such as in articles or resumes.

3. Online Editor

The term “online editor” includes anyone you can find online to look over your content. These editors are most likely freelancers, and their skill sets may vary. If you plan on hiring an online editor, first make sure he or she is well-versed in the type of editing you are looking for.

4. Critique Partner

A critique partner tends to be a writer or published author who looks over a story and helps another writer or aspiring author to raise the quality of his or her work. A CP may act more as a coach than an editor. You want a critique partner when you need guidance on developing a story for publication.

5. Commissioning Editor

Also known as an acquisition editor, a commissioning editor is the one who looks for books or articles for publication. This is the person to talk to if you’re looking to get a book published or if you’re a freelance writer and want to pitch an article or blog to a particular site or company.

6. Developmental Editor

Developmental editors act as coaches for writers to get a story ready for publication. When you need guidance on moving your story forward, developmental editors should be able to help. They may also spend some of their time ghostwriting.

7. Content Editor

Content editors look at everything the writing encompasses. With books, they look over the story and make changes as necessary to the plot, characters, setting and so forth. In journalism or online publications, a content editor ensures the article scope is accurate for its audience and subject matter.

8. Copy Editor

Copy editors, also known as line editors and sometimes as content editors, usually look at everything from facts to grammar and formatting. These editors can do it all.

9. Associate Editor

Associate editors often work for newspapers or magazines. Another term for this position is “section editor.” An associate editor often has the same responsibilities as an acquisition editor; he or she is in charge of seeking out stories or content for publication.

10. Contributing Editor

Contributing editors tend to contribute their services to a magazine or newspaper and may also be referred to as a roving editor. In the journalism industry, a contributing editor is sometimes called an editor-at-large.

11. Chief Editor

Also known as an executive editor, the chief editor is the person overall in charge of an article, story or other content. The chief editor is the one who looks over the final product to ensure it meets company standards and approves it for release.

12. Editor-in-Chief

The editor-in-chief is generally the person who oversees the editing department and manages all of the other editors for the company. The EIC is also responsible for maintaining the voice of the company and upholding its philosophy and mission. Publishing companies sometimes refer to editors-in-chief as editors-at-large, which essentially means they can work on whatever project they choose to.

See also:  How to Kill Pantry Moths With Home Remedies, Hunker

Make the Right Choice

Don’t underestimate the power of a good editor. There are excellent proofreading and editing tips for writers, but they’re no substitute for a fresh set of eyes. What other types of editors can you think of, and how can they help writers with their projects? Share your comments below!

www.bkacontent.com

12 Edible Insects: From Cockroaches To June Bugs

You will be surprised to discover how many insects are eaten across the world and what they taste like.

You will be surprised to discover how many insects are eaten across the world and what they taste like.

You will be surprised to discover how many insects are eaten across the world and what they taste like. Please do not treat this list as a cookbook, as most wild insects are not as safe to eat. None of them should be eaten raw, either. Of course, if you are allergic to shrimp, shellfish, or dust, never eat an insect, even a cooked one.

12. Periodical Cicadas

These legendary insects live underground for 17 years before emerging and molting into adults: there is a special schedule of different broods for the US, and many people collect them before their shell hardens. These cicadas can be sauteed or fried like shrimps, and are said to taste almost like a tender crab meet with asparagus notes. Different species of cicada are valued and eaten across Asia.

11. Cockroach

You can eat some species of cockroaches, just not your domestic ones! Food grade cockroaches are farmed on fresh fruits and leaves and then toasted, fried, sauteed, or boiled. Raw Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches contain a mild neurotoxin that numbs the mouth and throat of a human; once cooked, these 7 cm creatures are described tasting like “chicken, both greasy and crunchy.”

10. Centipede

Centipede is sometimes found as street food in China, but many cultures avoid them as many species are venomous. They also look like a nightmare, to our taste.

9. Cricket

House crickets (Acheta domesticus) are among the most commonly eaten and farmed insects in the world. They can be milled into flour, sauteed, boiled, fried, and roasted. While they are still categorized as novelty food in Western countries, they are regularly eaten in Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, and Mexico. In Thailand, where deep-fried crickets are a popular snack, 20 000 farms are raising them, and the annual production reaches 7 to 8000 tons.

That is because their food conversion ration is almost five times that of beef! Crickets can also be turned into a supplement by feeding them a desired mineral or vitamin before consumption; this is called “gut loading.”

8. Dragonfly

Both larva and adults of some species are eaten in Indonesia and China. They are roasted or fried and described tasting like a soft-shell crab with a more greasy texture.

7. Earthworm

Earthworms are eaten by the native Ye’kuana tribe of Venezuela. However, it is a terrible idea to eat earthworms collected in the wild as they are literally full of parasites, and it is not possible to clean out the contents of their digestive systems sufficiently. If you are eager to add earthworms to your diet, earworms raised safely can be purchased powdered or dried online. They are said to have an “iron” aftertaste.

6. Fly Pupae

Housefly pupae are said to taste like blood pudding and be rich in fatty acids, but you can not eat the pupae of the flies from your house. They are contaminated by domestic waste.

5. Grasshopper

There are several species of edible grasshoppers. Chapulins (Sphenarium genus) are very popular in Mexico: during the season, from May until autumn, they are collected, cleaned and washed, and then roasted on comal. They are sold like chips with salt, spices, chili, or lime. They are eaten as popcorn during sports events, in tacos, or on a tlayuda.

In 2007, chapulines from the Oaxacan were temporarily prohibited as they were found to contain high amounts of led. Nsenene grasshopper is a Ugandan snack that is fried until crispy and is said to taste like “a mix of chicken and shrimp if it had a texture of a crisp.”

4. Huhu Grub

This larva looks like huge maggots burrowing rotting wood. Despite this description and the texture of a fat sack, they are treated as a delicacy in New Zealand. They are sauteed or cooked similarly to seafood. The taste is described as “smooth peanut butter.”

3. Hornworm

Hornworms are caterpillars of Five-spotted hawk moth (Manduca quinquemaculata). They can grow as big as an adult finger and have to be kept away from tomatoes anyway, so it is an excellent way to get back at them for chewing on your patch. Tomato Hornworms can be fried up much the same as the fruit of the plant on which they feed.

After being cooked, they taste a bit like green tomatoes or tomato leaves. Here is the recipe suggestion (it comes from a fiction novel, so take it with a grain of salt): “lightly fry the hornworms in a wok with olive oil for about 4 minutes, taking care not to rupture them. Set them aside. Fry green tomato slices as you normally do. Top with two hornworms each.”

2. June Bug

Native Americans collected June bugs (Phyllophaga) in both larval and adult stages. They were roasted over coals and eaten as snacks.

1. Locust

Pesticides used to protect crops from locusts can make them unsuitable for human consumption, so not all locusts can be eaten, and the harvested stock should be tested. Up to these days, Locusts (Pantanga Succinct and others) are eaten in Asia and Africa, including the Middle East.

The Bible records that John the Baptist consumed wild honey and locusts during his life in the wilderness. Some locusts are listed as kosher in Torah, and eating locust is halal in Islamic tradition. Locusts are thoroughly cleaned, fried, roasted, and eaten as snacks. Because locusts occur in large amounts than can be consumed immediately, and the time between swarmings, they are also preserved by smoking or drying.

www.worldatlas.com

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