What is Bilingual Education?

What Is Bilingual Education?

Bilingual education began in the 1960s as a method to teach non-English-speaking students. The term bilingual education may also be used in reference to teaching English-speaking students a foreign language. Continue reading to find out more information about bilingual education and how to enter this career. Schools offering Teaching ESL degrees can also be found in these popular choices .

Forms of Bilingual Education

Bilingual education most often refers to the practice of teaching students English proficiency. There are a few different types of bilingual education programs and methods. The following list comprises the four most common types of bilingual education programs:

Transitional

In a transitional bilingual education program, children not fluent in English are taught some subjects in their native language. Other subjects are taught in English. Bilingual education was originally intended to be only a transitional program, but in some cases students remain in this program for an extended period of time.

Two-Way

Also known as dual language or bilingual immersion, a two-way bilingual education program employs two teachers in a single classroom. Instruction in the subject is given in both English and another language at the same time. It is believed this type of bilingual education program can be effective in teaching English to non-English-speaking students.

Immersion

Immersion refers to a type of bilingual education program wherein non-English-speaking students spend the entire day learning subjects taught in English. Teachers may attempt to simplify the language for these students if needed. Immersion might also refer to the practice of English-speaking students being taught another language.

English as a Second Language

English as a Second Language (ESL) is a bilingual education program that places students in specific classes that teach them to speak and write English. These students may take classes in other subjects, but the majority of their day is spent in ESL classes. Some programs have students attend only ESL classes for a certain period of time, possibly for up to one year, before beginning in academics.

Becoming a Bilingual Educator

Degree programs in bilingual education, ESL or in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) are commonly offered at the master’s degree level. These programs may be targeted to individuals who are already working as teachers of ESL or EFL (English as a Foreign Language) who want to improve their skills, or for those who hold any type of teaching degree and want to focus on this aspect of education. Some programs may just require an undergraduate degree. Courses in these programs may include cross-cultural linguistics studies, language acquisition and curriculum development.

Also, bachelor’s degree programs in education may offer a track in bilingual education, and there are post-bachelor’s and post-master’s certificate programs in bilingual education and TESOL. PhD programs exist as well, though these are focused on bilingual academic research.

All states require public school educators to hold state certification in teaching. Some states have professional bilingual education certification or endorsement requirements.

To continue researching, browse degree options below for course curriculum, prerequisites and financial aid information. Or, learn more about the subject by reading the related articles below:

learn.org

B.A. in Cinema-Television

Ranked Among Top National Universities, U.S. News & World Report, 2020

500+ National & International Student Film Awards

$35 Million Communication & Performing Arts Center

100+ student films produced every year

Lights. Camera. Action.

This is more than just a film degree. It’s a platform for you to inspire, teach, and entertain. Regent’s Bachelor of Arts in Cinema-Television degree will help prepare you to enter the entertainment industry so you can share your artistry and life-changing stories with the world.

EXPERIENCE THE BEST

Grow your technical proficiency with access to over $1 million worth of film and video equipment.

FUEL YOUR PASSION THROUGH A FILM MAJOR

Gain the necessary skills to produce, direct and edit. Learn how to operate a camera, edit, and control sound and lighting for maximum impact.

SHAPE YOUR WORLD

Explore all aspects of film production, media studies, and storytelling.

ALIGN YOURSELF WITH EXCELLENCE

Regent is ranked among top national universities by U.S. News & World Report, 2020. Presented from a Christian worldview, the in-demand cinema-television degree is supported by award-winning faculty in Virginia Beach. Meet the faculty.

On Campus in Virginia Beach

15-Week Course Sessions

120+ Credit Hours

On Campus

SESSION START:

TOTAL CREDIT HOURS: 120+

APPROVED DEGREE PLAN: Click to download PDF

Take Your Career to the Next Level

On completing the B.A. in Cinema-Television program you will be able to:

  • Convey ideas and stories to traditional and online audiences.
  • Understand how to operate a camera, edit, and control sound and lighting for maximum impact.
  • Explore the business of animation and 2-D design methods.

Career Opportunities:

  • Feature films
  • Broadcast television
  • Corporate video
  • Internet video production

Click any section below for additional information or access your course schedule.

Credits

Explores the roles of the various people and positions involved in the production of animation. Pitching, budgeting, and business plans are covered. Each student submits a budget and a business plan for a project. Students also present a pitch for their final project. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

Concepts of film aesthetics and analysis; exposure to classical Hollywood, documentary andEuropean art cinema. Emphasis on describing and analyzing film style.

How to develop and create a good story for film. Covering the theory and application of story fundamentals, character creation, story structure and script formatting.

The history of film from the early 20th century to the present. Attention given to contributions of various national and international filmmakers and production trends.

Basic principles of film production, including camera operation (focus, exposure, depth-of-field, and lenses), composition, sequencing, screen direction, camera moves, and basic lighting. The class will include skills exercises and story-centric projects. Prerequisites: CTVU 101 and CTVU 105.

Explores the visual techniques used in cinema, television, and other media. Students focus on aesthetics and styles while gaining hands-on experience with cinematography equipment.

Introduction to non-linear post-production. How to create and manage projects with an emphasis on picture and sound, keeping in mind the aesthetics of narrative and documentary editing.

Covers the techniques and practices of sound recording for location, studio, ADR and Foley. Includes double and single system techniques, as well as sound recording equipment.

Students examine the techniques employed in directing in workshop environment. Explores working with actors, director’s tools, script analysis, blocking, and working relationships on set.

Explores the organizational core of production crew, including the unit production manager, the first and second assistant directors, the production office coordinator, and the production auditor. How a film is managed from development to post-production. Essential production paperwork and contracts.

Students are immersed in live-broadcast studio production with hands-on experience, including single-camera information gathering for edited roll-in packages. Prerequisites: CTVU 103 and CTVU 229.

Advances the directing student’s ability to analyze a scripted scene or sequence, develop a unique vision derived through text analysis, and then communicate the vision through carefully designed camera movement and choreographed actor staging. Prerequisite: CTVU 260.

Students learn the language and theory of editing. Covers how editors look at footage, create a sequence by understanding the pace and rhythm intended, and make dynamic a story and set of characters. Prerequisite: CTVU 256.

Creation of a show concept from research and development to proposal to production of a live five-minute webisode. Emphasis placed on the role of the television producer and director, including strategies related to news, comedy, talk, reality and drama. Prerequisite: CTVU 350.

Examines how the production designer and art director create an imaginative world through visual storytelling. Key aspects of screen design, script analysis and interpretation. Prerequisites: CTVU 260 and CTVU 327.

Continues a two-semester long comprehensive project along with CTVU 496. Students advance skills in editing, sound design, minor special effects and color correction, as applied to the senior project. Prerequisites: CTVU 496 and Senior standing.

Historical study of traditional and new forms of documentary in film and television. Students progress through all stages of production from conception through post-production to accomplish a short documentary. Prerequisite: CTVU 362.

Laboratory course that covers operating cameras, creating graphics, technical operations, controlling audio and floor-managing live productions. Develops production work from previous writing workshops for sitcoms. Prerequisite: CTVU 430.

Begins two-semester long comprehensive project along with CTVU 456. Students produce a sophisticated short film documentary or commercial in a chosen genre. Pre-production and production phases with focus on the producer, director, cinematographer and production designer. Prerequisites: CTVU 327 and Senior standing.

Admission requirements vary based on the stage you’re at in life. Select a link below to learn how to apply.

2019-20 Tuition Rates

On-Campus Student

  • 12-18 credit hours per semester
  • Under 12 credit hours
  • Over 18 credit hours
  • $8,610 (block rate)
  • $605/credit hour
  • $574/credit hour

Online Student (enrolled in 8-week classes)

  • Full-time (12* credit hours)
  • Part-time (6* credit hours)

*Average number of credits per semester.

  • $395/credit hour
  • $450/credit hour

RN to B.S. in Nursing Tuition

Program Type Tuition
  • $295/credit hour

Student Fees

Fee

Amount

Description

Application Fee (On-Campus & Evening/Online Students)

One-time fee, nonrefundable

Enrollment Deposit (On-Campus Students)

Enrollment Deposit (Evening/Online Students)

Fee is deducted from tuition costs

Graduation Fee (On-Campus & Evening/Online Students)

One-time fee upon submission of graduation application

University Services Fee (On-Campus Students)

University Services Fee (Online Students)

Contributes to university academic and administrative operations

Optional Fees

Late Payment

Incurred per session in the event of late tuition payment

Course Fees

Varies,
$70-200 per course

Some courses in theater, animation, cinema television or science labs carry an additional fee

2020-21 Tuition Rates

On-Campus Student

  • 12-18 credit hours per semester
  • Under 12 credit hours
  • Over 18 credit hours
  • $8,610 (block rate)
  • $605/credit hour
  • $574/credit hour

Online Student (enrolled in 8-week classes)

  • Full-time (12* credit hours)
  • Part-time (6* credit hours)

*Average number of credits per semester.

  • $395/credit hour
  • $450/credit hour

RN to B.S. in Nursing Tuition

Program Type Tuition
  • $295/credit hour

Student Fees

Fee

Amount

Description

Application Fee (On-Campus & Evening/Online Students)

One-time fee, nonrefundable

Enrollment Deposit (On-Campus Students)

Enrollment Deposit (Evening/Online Students)

Fee is deducted from tuition costs

Graduation Fee (On-Campus & Evening/Online Students)

One-time fee upon submission of graduation application

University Services Fee (On-Campus Students)

University Services Fee (Online Students)

Contributes to university academic and administrative operations

Optional Fees

Late Payment

Incurred per session in the event of late tuition payment

Course Fees

Varies,
$70-200 per course

Some courses in theater, animation, cinema television or science labs carry an additional fee

Hear From Students & Alumni

Ben Kay, B.A., 2013

“At Regent, mentors are readily available if students seek them out. They’re just waiting for you to take the initiative and ask for support. The blessings are beyond anything you could imagine.”

Taniki Richard, B.S., 2015

«Regent’s online, eight-week programs will help you take responsibility and have a way to be self-taught. You’ll not only have that initiative, but you’ll be able to interact with your professors online. It was really good for me.»

Debbie Holloway, B.A. in English, 2012

«At Regent, we were encouraged in whatever we were studying and writing to tie into who we are as Christians and incorporate that extra layer. We were taught to do all things with excellence — and that should never be compromised.»

Luke Isbell, B.A., 2020

“I have loved every minute of the honor’s program … One thing that has continually surprised me has been the willingness of faculty members to take you under their wing and help you improve your skills.”

Elisa Sosa, B.A., 2019

«When I think about Regent, I think about the wonderful people I’ve met here that have supported and loved me with the love of Christ, and that have helped me make this a home away from my home in Guatemala.»

www.regent.edu

Decide whether to trust a database

This article contains an overview of how trust works in Access and what factors you should consider when you decide whether to trust an Access desktop database.

In this article

Overview

By default, Access disables all the potentially unsafe code or other components in a database, regardless of the version of Access that you used to create the database.

How Access lets you trust a database

When Access disables content, it informs you of the action by displaying the Message Bar.

If you see the Message Bar, you can choose whether to trust the disabled content in the database. If you decide to trust the disabled content, you can do so in two ways:

Use the Message Bar Click Enable Content on the Message Bar. When you choose this option, you may need to repeat the procedure if the database changes.

Trust the database permanently Place the database in a trusted location — a folder on a drive or network that you mark as trusted. When you choose this option, you no longer see the Message Bar, and you never have to enable the database content as long as the database remains in the trusted location.

If you do not want to trust the database, ignore or close the Message Bar. When you ignore or close the Message Bar, you can still view the data in the database and use any components in the database that Access has not disabled.

Factors to consider when deciding whether to trust a database

Before you decide whether to trust a database, you should consider the following factors.

Your own security policy You or your company may have a security policy in place that specifies how to handle Access database files. For example, you might have a very robust backup system in place, and decide that you are willing to trust most database files, unless you have a specific reason not to. Conversely, you may not have a good backup system, and therefore might want to be very cautious when you decide whether to trust a database.

Your goal When Access disables content in a database that you have not trusted, it does not block your access to the data in that database. If you want to review the data in a database and do not want to perform any actions that might be unsafe, such as running an action query or using certain macro actions, you do not have to trust the database. If you are not sure whether an action is considered unsafe, you can try to perform the action while the database content has been blocked by disabled mode. If the action is potentially unsafe, it will be blocked in this circumstance.

The database source If you created the database, or if you know that it came from a source that you trust, you can decide to trust the database. If the database came from a possibly unreliable source, you might want to leave the database untrusted until you make sure that its content is safe.

The contents of the database file If you cannot make a trust decision based on other information, you might consider thoroughly examining the database contents to see what potentially unsafe content the database might contain. After you conduct a complete check and are sure that the content is safe, you can decide to trust the database.

The security of the location where the database is stored Even if you know that the contents of a database file are safe, if the file is stored in a location that is not fully secure, someone might introduce unsafe content into the database. You should be careful when deciding to trust database files that are stored in locations that might not be secure.

Ways to trust a database

After you decide to trust a database, you can either trust it by using the Message Bar, or by putting the database file in a trusted location.

Enable content by using the Message Bar

The Message Bar appears just under the ribbon.

In the Message Bar, click Enable Content.

If you don’t see the Message Bar but content has been disabled, make sure that the Message Bar is enabled.

Enable the Message Bar

Click File > Options.

In the left pane of the Access Options dialog box, click Trust Center.

In the right pane, under Microsoft Office Access Trust Center, click Trust Center Settings.

In the left pane of the Trust Center dialog box, click Message Bar.

In the right pane, click Show the Message Bar in all applications when active content, such as macros and ActiveX controls, has been blocked, and then click OK.

Close and reopen the database to apply the changed setting.

Once the Message Bar is visible and enabled, you can use it to enable content.

Move a database file to a trusted location

To specify that a given database is trustworthy and should be enabled by default, make sure that the database file is located in a trusted location. A trusted location is a folder or file path on your computer or a location on your intranet from which it is considered safe to run code. Default trusted locations include the Templates, AddIns, and Startup folders. You can also specify your own trusted locations.

Tip: If you want to know the path of the current database, click the File tab to open Backstage view. The full path of the current database’s location is listed on the Info tab.

Open the folder where the database file is currently located, and then copy the database file into the trusted location that you want.

Specify a trusted location

On the File tab, click Options.

In the Access Options dialog box, on the left, click Trust Center.

On the right, under Microsoft Office Access Trust Center, click Trust Center Settings.

In the left pane of the Trust Center dialog box, click Trusted Locations.

To add a network location, in the right pane, select the Allow Trusted Locations on my network check box.

Click Add new location.

In the Microsoft Office Trusted Location dialog box, use one of the following methods:

In the Path box, type the full path of the location that you want to add.

Click Browse to browse to the location.

To specify that subfolders of the new trusted locations should also be trusted, select the Subfolders of this location are also trusted check box.

Optionally, in the Description box, type a description for the trusted location.

support.microsoft.com

release-2.0: c-deps: bump CryptoPP to avoid SIGTRAP on macOS #31522

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benesch commented Oct 16, 2018

Backport 1/1 commits from #31516.

Bump CryptoPP to pick up a fix for #31380.
Details reproduced below.

As part of its CPU feature detection, CryptoPP installs a SIGILL signal
handler before issuing the cpuid instruction. The intent is to
gracefully degrade on CPUs that don’t support the cpuid instruction.

The problem is that it is impossible to safely overwrite a signal
handler installed by the Go runtime in go1.10 on macOS
(golang/go#22805). This causes CockroachDB 2.0 to crash on macOS Mojave:
#31380.

The situation has improved on the Go front, as go1.11 makes it possible
to safely save and restore signal handlers installed by the Go runtime
on macOS.

Still, we can do better and support go1.10. There is no need to bother
installing a SIGILL handler, as the cpuid instruction is supported by
every x86-64 CPU. We can instead use conditional compilation to make
sure that we never execute a cpuid instruction on a non x86-64 CPU.

Note that CPU feature detection is performed at executable load time
(see the attribute(constructor) on DetectX86Features); therefore any
reference to function which calls DetectX86Features (notably HasAESNI)
corrupts the signal handler. It’s not entirely clear why this corruption
later leads to the SIGTRAP seen in #31380—is
something in macOS or the Go runtime generating a SIGILL and trying to
handle it gracefully?—but regardless, not mucking with the signal
handler fixes the issue.

Release note (bug fix): CockroachDB no longer crashes due to a SIGTRAP error
soon after startup on macOS Mojave (#31380).

github.com

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