Insecticide poisoning: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

Insecticide poisoning

Insecticide is a chemical that kills bugs. Insecticide poisoning occurs when someone swallows or breathes in this substance or it is absorbed through the skin.

This article is for information only. DO NOT use it to treat or manage an actual poison exposure. If you or someone you are with has an exposure, call your local emergency number (such as 911), or your local poison center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States.

Poisonous Ingredient

Most household bug sprays contain plant-derived chemicals called pyrethrins. These chemicals were originally isolated from chrysanthemum flowers and are generally not harmful. However, they can cause life-threatening breathing problems if they are breathed in.

Stronger insecticides, which a commercial greenhouse might use or someone might store in their garage, contain many dangerous substances. These include:

Where Found

Various insecticides contain these chemicals.

Symptoms

Below are symptoms of insecticide poisoning in different parts of the body.

Symptoms of pyrethrin poisoning:

LUNGS AND AIRWAYS

  • Coma (decreased level of consciousness and lack of responsiveness)
  • Seizures
  • Irritation
  • Redness or swelling

Symptoms of organophosphate or carbamate poisoning:

HEART AND BLOOD

LUNGS AND AIRWAYS

  • Anxiety
  • Coma (decreased level of consciousness and lack of responsiveness)
  • Convulsions
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Weakness

BLADDER AND KIDNEYS

EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT

STOMACH AND INTESTINES

  • Abdominal cramps
  • Diarrhea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea and vomiting

Note: Serious poisoning can occur if an organophosphate gets on your bare skin or if you don’t wash your skin soon after it gets on you. Large amounts of the chemical soak through the skin unless you are protected. Life-threatening paralysis and death can occur very quickly.

Symptoms of paradichlorobenzene poisoning:

STOMACH AND INTESTINES

  • Diarrhea
  • Abdominal pain
  • Nausea and vomiting

Note: Paradichlorobenzene mothballs are not very toxic. They have replaced the more toxic camphor and naphthalene types.

Home Care

Get medical help right away. Do NOT make the person throw up unless poison control or a health care provider tells you to.

If the chemical is on the skin or in the eyes, flush with lots of water for at least 15 minutes.

If the person breathed in the poison, move them to fresh air right away.

Before Calling Emergency

Have this information ready:

  • Person’s age, weight, and condition
  • Name of the product (ingredients and strength, if known)
  • Time it was swallowed
  • Amount swallowed

Poison Control

Your local poison control center can be reached directly by calling the national toll-free Poison Help hotline (1-800-222-1222) from anywhere in the United States. This national hotline will let you talk to experts in poisoning. They will give you further instructions.

This is a free and confidential service. All local poison control centers in the United States use this national number. You should call if you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to be an emergency. You can call for any reason, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

What to Expect at the Emergency Room

Take the container with you to the hospital, if possible.

The provider will measure and monitor the person’s vital signs, including temperature, pulse, breathing rate, and blood pressure.

Tests that may be done include:

  • Bronchoscopy: camera down the throat to look for burns in the airways and lungs
  • Chest x-ray
  • ECG (electrocardiogram), or heart tracing
  • Endoscopy: camera down the throat to look for burns in the esophagus and the stomach

Treatment may include:

  • Fluids by IV (through a vein)
  • Activated charcoal
  • Medicine to treat symptoms
  • Tube through the mouth into the stomach to empty the stomach (gastric lavage)
  • Washing of the skin (irrigation), perhaps every few hours for several days
  • Surgery to remove burned skin
  • Breathing support, including tube through the mouth into the lungs and connected to a breathing machine (ventilator)

Outlook (Prognosis)

How well someone does depends on how severe the poisoning is and how quickly treatment is received. The faster medical help is given, the better the chance for recovery. Swallowing these poisons can have severe effects on many parts of the body.

It is a good sign that recovery will occur if the person continues to improve in the first 4 to 6 hours after they receive treatment.

Although the symptoms are the same for carbamate and organophosphate poisoning, it is harder to recover after organophosphate poisoning.

Alternative Names

Organophosphate poisoning; Carbamate poisoning

References

Cannon RD, Ruha A-M. Insecticides, herbicides, and rodenticides. In: Adams JG, ed. Emergency Medicine. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 146.

Welker K, Thompson TM. Pesticides. In: Walls RM, Hockberger RS, Gausche-Hill M, eds. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 152.

medlineplus.gov

Dawn Detergent as Insect Repellent

Dawn Detergent as Insect Repellent

Related Articles

Dawn detergent is a grease-fighting dish soap that has kept tableware and cutlery sparkling clean since 1973. It is also one of the soaps of choice for homemade insecticides, according to the University of Florida IFAS Extension website. Homemade insecticidal soaps containing Dawn detergent helps control garden pests that attack indoor and outdoor plants without posing a health risk to your family.

Insects

Insecticidal soap controls various sap-sucking insects plaguing plants such as aphids, spider mites, whiteflies, mealybugs and scale. These pests feed on the cell content of plants, leading to leaf discoloration, loss of vigor, leaf dropping and stunted growth. Insecticidal soap has a low toxicity level to beneficial insects — such as bees and butterflies — and breaks down in the environment quickly, leaving no residue behind. However, insecticidal soap must directly come in contact with the soft-bodied pests to successfully control them.

Insecticidal Soaps

Both commercial and homemade insecticidal soaps contain potassium of fatty acids, which dissolves the exoskeleton and disrupts the insect’s cell membrane. Never use automatic dishwasher soap, laundry detergent or dry detergent, according to the University of Florida IFAS Extension website. These products can cause more harm to the plants than the insects you are trying to control.

Recipe

The recipe for homemade insecticidal soap requires only three ingredients: Dawn dish soap, vegetable oil and soft water. Mix 2.5 tablespoons of the Dawn dish soap and 2.5 tablespoons of vegetable oil with 1 gallon of warm soft water. The Dawn dish soap used in the recipe must not contain bleach, which could harm the plants. Furthermore, you should always use soft water when diluting pesticides. Hard water contains minerals, which interfere with the insecticidal soap, reducing its effectiveness.

Application

To apply the homemade insecticidal soap, you will need to spray the infested plant — undersides and tops of leaves, stems, buds and blooms — thoroughly with the solution. For easier application of the homemade pesticide, transfer the solution to a clean spray bottle or garden sprayer after mixing the ingredients together. Repeat the treatment at 7- to 14-day intervals until you have controlled the soft-bodied, sap-sucking pests.

Consideration

Never apply insecticidal soap to plants with hairy or waxy leaves, or when temperatures are above 90 degrees Fahrenheit. When in doubt, always test the insecticide on a small portion of the plant’s leaves and wait 24 hours. If no damage to the plant has occurred, continue with the treatment. Furthermore, when treating outdoor plants do so on a calm day to help prevent wind drifts and on a day when no rain is expected for 24 hours after the application.

homeguides.sfgate.com

US EPA

How can you safely solve your pest problems? The key is to be willing to ask questions. Learning about the pests you have and options that are available to control specific pests is the first step.

Learn more about the steps you can take to safely control pests:

Try pest prevention first.

  • Remove sources of food, water and shelter.
  • Store food in sealed plastic or glass containers. Garbage containing food scraps should be placed in tightly covered trash cans. Remove garbage regularly from your home.
  • Fix leaky plumbing and don’t let water accumulate anywhere in the home. Don’t let water collect in trays under your house plants or refrigerator. Don’t leave pet food and water out overnight.
  • Clutter provides places for pests to breed and hide and makes it hard to get rid of them. Get rid of things like stacks of newspapers, magazines, or cardboard.
  • Close off places where pests can enter and hide. For example, caulk cracks and crevices around cabinets or baseboards. Use steel wool to fill spaces around pipes. Cover any holes with wire mesh.
  • Learn about the pests you have and options to control them.
  • Check for pests in packages or boxes before carrying them into your home.

Do safely and correctly use pesticides.

  • Keep pets and children away from areas where pesticides have been applied.
  • After preventive steps have been taken, you can use baits as a first line of chemical defense against insects or rodents.
    • These are often effective and can be used with low risk of exposure to the pesticide, as long as they are kept out of the reach of children and pets.
  • Other relatively low-risk pesticides are available for some pests. Consult your local cooperative extension service officeExit for recommendations suitable for your area.
  • Pesticides not contained in baits or traps should generally only be applied to targeted locations, not sprayed over the whole room.
  • Use fogging devices only when absolutely necessary.
  • Always read and follow the pesticide label’s instructions and safety warnings.
  • Use ready-to-use products (i.e., no mixing needed) whenever possible.
  • If you hire any outside persons to help control pests, ask them to find and correct the source of the problem before applying pesticides.
    • For example, you might have to repair a leaky toilet to remove a water source.
    • Ask them to use baits and crack and crevice treatments when feasible.
  • Only apply chemicals approved for use in homes.
    • The label will list where the chemical may be used.
    • Write down the name and EPA registration number of any chemical used by someone you hire. You will need this information if you decide to look up more information on the pesticide.
    • The pest control operator should be able to provide information about the chemical, such as the material safety data sheet.

Do dispose of leftover pesticides and pesticide containers properly.

  • Read the label to find out how to dispose of the pesticide and the container.
  • Many communities have household hazardous waste collections that will accept unwanted pesticides. Call your waste disposal authority for information about your community.

Don’t use outdoor chemicals indoors.

  • Many chemicals intended for use outdoors are dangerous to use indoors because they will remain toxic longer inside than they would outdoors.

Don’t assume that twice as much is better.

  • Always read and follow label directions.
  • Using too much of a pesticide can endanger your family’s health.

Don’t transfer pesticides to other containers.

  • Store pesticides in their original containers.
  • Only mix as much as you are going to use at one time if the pesticide must be mixed with water.
  • Don’t use empty pesticide containers to store anything else.
    • Children and others have been poisoned by accidentally consuming pesticides stored in food or beverage containers.
    • No matter how well you wash the container, it could still contain remnants of the pesticide and could harm someone.

Additional Resources

Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem.

www.epa.gov

9 bug reporting templates you can copy for your web testing process

Web testing is tough.

That’s why choosing a bug reporting process is necessary.

Whether your organisation needs to report issues in a bug tracking app like Jira, GitHub, Trello, GitLab, Asana or keep a backlog in an Excel (.xls) spreadsheet, Word document (.doc) or via email, this post offers free bug reporting templates you can easily copy and implement with your team. Find what works for you in this list:

There are many different elements you can include in your bug report, but below are some examples of the most important. Usually, the bigger your organization, the more detailed your reports need to be.

The indispensable elements are:

  • ID/name: Keep it brief and use correct terms. A best practice is to include the name of the feature where you found an issue. A good example could be ‘CART — Unable to add new item to my cart’.
  • Description/summary: If you feel the name is not sufficient, explain the bug in a few words. Share it in easy-to-understand language. Keep in mind that your description might be used to search in your bug tracking application, so make sure to use the right words.
  • Environment: Depending on your browser, operating system, zoom level and screen size, websites may behave differently from one environment to another. Make sure your developers know your technical environment.
  • Source URL: Make it easy for your developers spot the problem by including the URL of the page where you found the bug. Big time saver!
  • Visual proof: A picture is worth a thousand words. Although it might not be enough, a visual element like a screenshot or a video will help your developers understand the problem better and faster.
  • Steps to reproduce: A screenshot is a proof that you had a problem, but keep in mind that your developer might not be able to reproduce the bug. Make sure to describe, with as much detail as possible, the steps you took before you encountered the bug.
  • Expected vs. actual results: Explain what results you expected — be as specific as possible. Just saying «the app doesn’t work as expected» is not useful. It’s also helpful to describe what you actually experienced.
  • Optional: You can also include extra information such as the severity (critical, major, minor, trivial, enhancement), priority (high, medium, low), name of the reporter, person assigned or a due date.

Bugs can be reported in a number of ways. However, using a bug tracker is probably the best way for your organization to move bugs from reported to fixed and help your developers stay focused.

1) Reporting bugs in GitHub with templates

A large number of developers use GitHub to build software in teams. The original goal of GitHub was to help developers collaborate on code, but as the services grew, they added more features and become a project management tool for building software. GitHub has an issue tracker built in, which makes it easy for developers to keep track of bugs.

Taking into account the suggested elements from above, a well documented GitHub issue might look like this:

As you can imagine, filling out a bug report like this one can take a while. If you need to report dozens of bugs during a testing session, it could take you several hours.

Fortunately, you can speed up that process dramatically by using Marker.io for GitHub. Take a screenshot with Marker.io when you spot a problem on your website, add annotations to get your point across and in 1-click the tool will convert it into a GitHub issue. All the important technical information (e.g.browser version, operating system, screen size and zoom level) are automatically embedded into your screenshot and included in your GitHub issue — without you having to do any extra work.

You can even use the built-in bug report template before creating your issue and fill out the steps to reproduce the bug, as well as the expected and actual results.

If your team is on GitHub, consider signing up for a free Marker.io trial.

2) Reporting bugs in Jira with templates

Jira is a famous issue and project tracking software designed for development teams. It’s a bit complex for small teams, but it’s also very powerful — which is why some of the most well-known tech companies in the world use it.

I’m not going to review how Jira works, because it’s beyond the scope of this blog post. The important thing to understand is the concept of a Jira issue. In Jira, an issue is a ticket that enters the system. It can be a project task, a Helpdesk ticket or a software bug.

Bugs can be reported by anyone in the organization, so it’s important to define a process and a template that everyone can easily use.

A well documented bug in Jira looks something like this:

You can see that all elements of a well-reported bug are present, including: name/ID, summary, visual proof, environment, source URL, steps to reproduce, expected vs. actual results.

As you can imagine, filling out a bug report like this one can take a while. If you need to report dozens of bugs during a testing session, it could take you a while.

Fortunately, you can speed that process up dramatically by using Marker.io for Jira. Take a screenshot with Marker.io when you spot a problem on your website, add an annotation to get your point across. Marker.io will in 1-click convert it into a Jira issue. All the important technical information (e.g.browser version, operating system, screen size and zoom level) are automatically embedded into your screenshot and included in your Jira issue — without you having to do any extra work.

You can even use the built-in bug report template before creating your issue and fill out the steps to reproduce the bug, as well as the expected and actual results.

If your team is already using Jira, consider signing up for a free Marker.io trial.

3) Reporting bugs in Trello with templates

Trello is a free and super easy-to-use project management tool. Its ease of use is what makes it perfect for both small or medium size organizations.

For your bug tracking purposes, simply set up a board called bug tracking. I recommend creating the following lists: reported, accepted, in progress, to be validated, done. You can even use labels to define the importance of your bugs (critical, major, minor, trivial, enhancement). Next, start adding a Trello card for each bug.

Taking into account the previous suggested elements, a well documented bug report in Trello should look like this:

Side note: I published a post on Trello’s blog about managing your bug tracking with Trello.

All the elements of a well-reported issue are present, including: name, summary, visual proof, environment, source URL, steps to reproduce, expected vs. actual results.

As you can imagine, filling out a bug report like this one can take a while. If you need to report dozens of bugs during a testing session, it could take you a while.

Fortunately, you can speed up that process dramatically by using Marker.io for Trello. Take a screenshot with Marker.io when you spot a problem on your website, add annotations to get your point across and in 1-click the tool will convert it into a Trello card. All the important technical information (e.g.browser version, operating system, screen size and zoom level) are automatically embedded into your screenshot and included in your Trello card without you having to do any extra work.

You can even use the built-in bug report template before creating your card and fill out the steps to reproduce the bug, as well as the expected and actual results.

If your team is already using Trello, consider signing up for a free Marker.io trial.

4) Reporting bugs in GitLab with templates

With the recent acquisition of Github by Microsoft, an increasingly amount of teams are switching to Gitlab to manage the whole DevOps lifecycle in one place. All GitLab projects come with an issue tracker, making bug reporting and issue tracking a breeze.

Ideally when a developer receives a new bug report, they would like new GitLab issues to have a similar structure to this:

While developers would want all Gitlab bug reports in GitLab to be as detailed as the screenshot above, this can drive reporters crazy! It’s just to much info and too many pieces of software. For reporters like clients, users and non technical colleagues, the GitLab interface can definitely be overwhelming.

Thankfully, you can speed up that process dramatically by using Marker.io for GitLab, the best way to report visual and highly actionable bug reports into GitLab, without ever leaving your website. Simply snap a screenshot, add annotations and click send! Marker.io will automatically capture all technical data from the reporter’s environment such as Browser, Operation system, screen size, etc. ). Finally, if you want your reporters to follow a specific bug report template to help structure the issue description, simply switch on the template

If you’re team is running on GitLab, sign up for your free trial of Marker.io for Gitlab

5) Reporting bugs in Asana with templates

Asana has really become over the years the professional alternative to simpler project management tools like Trello. Although Asana is great for keeping track of tasks, an increasingly amount of teams are also using it as a bug tracker.

Ideally when a developer receives a new bug report in Asana, they would like new Asana tasks to have a similar structure to this:

As you can see, all the elements for a great bug reports are all in there! However, creating such a detailed bug report in Asana can be overwhelming for clients, users and non technical colleagues.

Fortunately, you can speed up that process dramatically by using Marker.io for Asana. Take a screenshot with Marker.io when you spot a problem on your website, add annotations to get your point across and in 1-click the tool will convert it into a Asana task. All the important technical information (e.g.browser version, operating system, screen size and zoom level) are automatically embedded into your screenshot and included in your Asana task without you having to do any extra work.

Finally, if you want your reporters to follow a specific bug report template to help structure the bug report into the Asana description, simply switch on the template to have the steps to reproduce the bug, as well as the expected and actual results.

If you’re team is running on Asana, start your free trial of Marker.io for Asana

6) Reporting bugs in Excel with templates

Reporting bugs in a spreadsheet can be a cumbersome process. However, smaller teams can still benefits from this method. If you’re team decided to report and track bugs in Excel, it’s important to define a template that everyone in the organisations agrees to.

In this template, you’ll find all the elements you need to report bugs in a structured way:

Download the templates here:

7) Reporting bugs in Microsoft (MS) Word with templates

Although not optimal, reporting bugs in a .doc file can be a fast and structured way to report bugs to technical members on your team. As always, make sure that all necessary information is there. You don’t want your developers to have to come back to you, and ask for more information.

Here is what your bug report template should look like:

8) Reporting bugs in PDF with templates

Reporting bugs in a PDF file is similar to the previous MS Word document option. PDFs are not very flexible, however it might be a requirement to use them inside your organization. If that’s your case, feel free to copy our template.

I’ve prepared the document from above in a PDF file for you to download here

9) Reporting bugs in email with templates

Most communication is still done through email. For example, if you’re a web agency client but the team didn’t give you a structured process to report bugs, you can always send them via email. To ensure your emails always follow the same structure, we recommend saving the email template below for your bug reporting.

Copy paste the content in this text file or download the txt file.

Conclusion

Web and software testing is tough. A lot of people from different backgrounds and expertise need to give their feedback. Miscommunication can lead to huge delays and growing frustration. By establishing a process for reporting bug based on a fixed template, you can greatly reduce these problems.

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