Choice 10 (Potassium Chloride) Oral: Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings — Dosing

Choice 10 (Potassium Chloride) Liquid

GENERIC NAME(S): Potassium Chloride

This medication is a mineral supplement used to treat or prevent low amounts of potassium in the blood. A normal level of potassium in the blood is important. Potassium helps your cells, kidneys, heart, muscles, and nerves work properly. Most people get enough potassium by eating a well-balanced diet. Some conditions that can lower your body’s potassium level include severe prolonged diarrhea and vomiting, hormone problems such as hyperaldosteronism, or treatment with «water pills»/diuretics.

How to use Choice 10 (Potassium Chloride) Liquid

To prevent stomach upset, you must first mix your dose of potassium with a glass (4 to 8 ounces/120 to 240 milliliters) of cold water or juice as directed by your doctor. If you are using the liquid form of this medication, carefully measure the dose using a special measuring device/spoon. Do not use a household spoon because you may not get the correct dose. After mixing, slowly drink the entire mixture. Take each dose after a meal. If you have upset stomach, mixing your dose in a larger amount of liquid may help. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same time(s) each day. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Do not increase your dose or take it more often than prescribed.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if you have symptoms of low potassium in the blood (such as irregular heartbeat, muscle weakness/cramps).

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Side Effects

Upset stomach, nausea, vomiting, gas, or diarrhea may occur. If any of these effects persist or worsen, tell your doctor or pharmacist promptly.

Remember that your doctor has prescribed this medication because he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

Get medical help right away if you have any very serious side effects, including: vomit that looks like coffee grounds, stomach/abdominal pain, black/tarry stools.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, get medical help right away if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada — Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

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Precautions

Before taking potassium, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you have any allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: heart problems, kidney problems, high levels of potassium in the blood, throat/stomach/intestinal problems (such as blockage, narrowing, ulcers).

Liquid products may contain alcohol, sugar, or aspartame. Caution is advised if you have diabetes, liver disease, phenylketonuria (PKU), or any other condition that requires you to limit/avoid these substances in your diet.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

Before using other potassium supplements or salt substitutes that contain potassium, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Too much potassium may cause serious side effects. (See also Overdose section.)

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor.

Potassium passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

www.webmd.com

Fiber Choice (Inulin-Sorbitol) 1.5 Gram Chewable Tablet

GENERIC NAME(S): Inulin-Sorbitol

OTHER NAME(S): Fiber Choice (Inulin-Sorbitol) Tablet,Chewable

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

How to use Fiber Choice (Inulin-Sorbitol) 1.5 Gram Chewable Tablet

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

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Side Effects

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada — Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Related Links

Precautions

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Related Links

Interactions

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

Related Links

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

Notes

Missed Dose

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Storage

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Information last revised July 2016. Copyright(c) 2016 First Databank, Inc.

www.webmd.com

Pot Still a Drug of Choice for Many U.S. Adults

By Robert Preidt

THURSDAY, June 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Fewer American teens may be smoking pot, but the same can’t be said for older adults, a new study finds.

Researchers analyzed federal government data and found that non-daily marijuana use fell among Americans aged 12 to 25 and 35 to 49 before 2007, but rose among all adults after 2007. This was particularly true among adults 26 to 34 — a 4.5 percent increase.

Daily marijuana use was highest among adults aged 18 to 34. Adults aged 50 to 64 were the only age group with increases in non-daily marijuana use both before and after 2007, the researchers reported.

If the trends continue, marijuana use by adults aged 50 to 64 could surpass that of the 35-to-49 age group, according to the study.

«Increases in daily and non-daily cannabis use among adults after 2007 could be due to increasingly permissive cannabis legislation, attitudes, and lower risk perception,» study first author Pia Mauro, an assistant professor of epidemiology at Columbia University’s School of Public Health, said in a university news release.

As of September 2017, medical marijuana was legal in 29 states and the District of Columbia, and recreational use was legal in eight states and the District of Columbia, the researchers noted.

Study senior author Dr. Silvia Martins said that «not all adults use cannabis at the same rate. Understanding the ages at which young people and adults use cannabis can help target appropriate reduction or prevention interventions.» Martins is an associate professor of epidemiology at the School of Public Health.

«Research about the patterns and consequences of cannabis use in baby boomers in particular is needed, since use is high in this birth cohort and is expected to continue to increase,» Martins said.

She added that «significant increases in non-daily cannabis use among adults 65 and older defy perceptions that older adults do not use cannabis, although daily use in this age group remains rare.»

The study, published online in the May issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, was funded by grants from the U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse and the New York State Psychiatric Institute.

On Wednesday, Canadian lawmakers approved the recreational use of marijuana, making it just the second country to do so.

www.webmd.com

Audiologist’s Choice Drops

GENERIC NAME(S): Carbamide Peroxide

This medication is used to treat earwax buildup. It helps to soften, loosen, and remove the earwax. Too much earwax can block the ear canal and reduce hearing. This medication releases oxygen and starts to foam when it comes in contact with the skin. The foaming helps break up and remove the earwax.

Consult your doctor before using this product in children younger than 12 years.

How to use Audiologist’s Choice Drops

This medication is for use only in the ear. Apply this medication into the ear, usually twice daily or as directed by your doctor. Do not use this medication for more than 4 days at a time unless your doctor instructs you to. Follow all directions on the product package. If you are uncertain about any of the information, consult your doctor or pharmacist.

To make sure that the right amount of medication is given, and to avoid touching the ear with the dropper, have another person give the drops if possible. To lower the risk of dizziness, hold the container in your hand for a few minutes to warm it.

To apply ear drops, wash your hands first. To avoid contamination, do not touch the dropper tip or let it touch your ear or any other surface. Lie on your side or tilt the affected ear upward. Hold the dropper directly over the ear and place 5 to 10 drops into the ear canal. To help the drops roll into the ear of an adult, hold the earlobe up and back. In children, hold the earlobe down and back. Keep the head tilted for several minutes or insert a soft cotton plug in the ear.

If there is any wax remaining after treatment, it may be removed by gently rinsing the ear with warm water or using an ear syringe with a soft rubber bulb. Consult your doctor or pharmacist about using an ear syringe safely.

Do not rinse the dropper. Replace the dropper cap after use.

Avoid getting this medication in your eyes. If this occurs, rinse the eyes thoroughly with water.

If your condition persists after 4 days of use or if it worsens, or if you think you may have a serious medical problem, seek immediate medical attention.

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Side Effects

Side effects usually do not occur with this product.

If your doctor has directed you to use this medication, remember that he or she has judged that the benefit to you is greater than the risk of side effects. Many people using this medication do not have serious side effects.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

This is not a complete list of possible side effects. If you notice other effects not listed above, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada — Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

If you have any of the following health problems, consult your doctor or pharmacist before using this product: other ear problems (e.g., ear drainage, infection, pain, rash, injury, recent ear surgery, hole/perforation in the eardrum), dizziness.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast-feeding before using this medication.

Interactions

If you are using this product under your doctor’s direction, your doctor or pharmacist may already be aware of possible drug interactions and may be monitoring you for them. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with your doctor or pharmacist first.

Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

Overdose

This medicine may be harmful if swallowed. If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

Notes

Do not share this medication with others.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose, use it as soon as you remember. If it is near the time of the next dose, skip the missed dose. Use your next dose at the regular time. Do not double the dose to catch up.

Storage

Store at room temperature away from direct sunlight and heat. Refer to storage information printed on the package. If you have any questions about storage, ask your pharmacist. Keep all drug products away from children and pets.

www.webmd.com

Using sub solution for drug test?

Using sub solution for drug test?

So I am about to get a job pending a drug test, has anyone used Sub Solution synthetic urine? I’ve read it’s better then quick fix 6.2 however I cant find a lot of actual reviews for it

Here’s an honest review. it doesn’t matter what kind of test you take (ECup/Lab). here’s the most important thing. GET THE TEMP RIGHT. The techs do not care if your urine is real, a sub or dirty. they’re watching out for themselves and if that temp is too high or too low you’re screwed, bc then they’ll have answer why they passed it off.

I literally just took a lab test at Quest, I went into the bathroom on my own. I work in HR, it’s absolutely illegal for them to watch you unless it’s Court mandated or you’ve tested positive the first time. You empty you pockets into a lock box (my sub was in a pair of compression shorts) and you fill up a cup. I would recommend you buy the 3oz, I went with the 2oz, it made it to the line, but it’s more realistic if to add more. I handed it to the Tech, she checked the temp -98 degrees- I signed a few things and she said see ya later. That’s the hardest part. the lab will always pass you bc Quick Fix is formulated to pass. I just got word I’m cleared for hire. I DEF recommend Quick Fix if you need it.

Thanks this was useful! I haven’t done the test yet but at least I know they wont be looking at me

I just passed, been a week and half with not being fired. Subbed at concentra, for quest.

I just passed to, stressful but it all worked

www.reddit.com

Addiction and Free Choice

Archive Sections

The recent death of Phillip Seymour Hoffman as a result of drug addiction has provoked many thoughtful, sympathetic responses in the media, from people in recovery who understand how hard it is to wrestle with addiction, as well as from scientifically informed journalists who understand that addiction is a disease. But it has also prompted others to express the age-old notion than drug use is a choice, and that those who die as a consequence of their drug use are just reaping the consequences of their freely chosen actions. It is unfortunate that that view persists in our society, despite the decades of scientific research soundly disproving it.

Choices do not happen without a brain—it is the mechanism of choice. The quality of a person’s choices depends on the health of that mechanism. However much we may wish that a person’s choices were free in all instances, it is simply a fact that an addicted person’s failures in the realm of choice are the product of a brain that has become greatly compromised—it is readily apparent when we scan their brains. Even if taking a drug for the first time is a “free” choice, the progression of brain changes that occurs after that involves the weakening of circuits in the prefrontal cortex and elsewhere that are necessary for exerting self-control and resisting the temptations of drug use. Once addiction takes hold, there is greatly diminished capacity, on one’s own, to stop using. This is why psychiatry recognizes addiction as a disease of the brain, and why professional intervention is needed to treat it in most instances.

Moreover, even the “freely willed” first choice to take a drug cannot be the basis for judgment and stigma against people suffering from addictions. Matters of choice and lifestyle—what you eat, how active you are, where you live—may contribute to the risk for, or even directly cause, a wide range of medical conditions, including chronic diseases like heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and several cancers. We do not withhold or impede treatment of people suffering from those conditions, even if their health may have turned out differently had they made different choices at various points in their lives.

There is no way of precisely predicting which freely chosen adolescent drink, or cigarette, or experimentation with an illegal substance, opened the door to a later loss of free-choice capacity in a person who has become addicted. But once addiction is established, the sufferer from this disease cannot will themselves to be healthy and avoid drugs any more than a person with heart disease can will their heart back to perfect functioning, or a person with diabetes can will their body’s insulin response to return to normal.

Thus, those who say “it was their own choice” after a person dies of an overdose fail to grasp that an addicted person’s brain has a disrupted choice mechanism. And as revealed by Hoffman’s tragic, ultimately fatal relapse into drug taking, the neuronal disruptions in the brain of an addicted person can persist even after decades of sobriety. Speaking of “free choice” is simply not useful when trying to understand an individual’s addiction or its consequences, as addiction is precisely a disease that disrupts the neuronal circuits that enable us to exert free choice.

archives.drugabuse.gov

My Drug Of Choice

My Drug Of Choice

(I’ve never written anything before so please excuse my amateurishness)

The warning bells rung Indiscriminate shouts were heard Curiosity and fear clashed The very thought felt absurd

I gazed at you in awe My parents would balk at the notion My friends gave me the green light My desires were set into motion

I absorbed your gentle touch Not sure if it was wise Catching sight of the reflection Of the fire in my eyes

Relishing your distinct flavour Felt a breeze on my tongue I drew in with trepidation Tightening my lung

A high sense of euphoria Slowly warming my brain As I eased into your embrace You took away my pain

Still giddy from anticipation Astonished, with slight doubt The ecstacy momentarily ended But the love never died out

In the days that followed I searched for a secluded place Stashed in sneaky corners I gained solace from your face

The flow began getting smoother As we formed a special bond People would always come and go But I knew you’d never abscond

Even now, trapped within these walls My emotions in disarray I yearn to have you in front of me You make me truly gay

www.reddit.com

Fiber Choice Tablet, Chewable

GENERIC NAME(S): Fiber

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

How to use Fiber Choice Tablet, Chewable

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Related Links

Side Effects

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or at www.fda.gov/medwatch.

In Canada — Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to Health Canada at 1-866-234-2345.

Precautions

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Interactions

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Keep a list of all your medications with you, and share the list with your doctor and pharmacist.

Related Links

Overdose

If someone has overdosed and has serious symptoms such as passing out or trouble breathing, call 911. Otherwise, call a poison control center right away. US residents can call their local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. Canada residents can call a provincial poison control center.

Notes

Missed Dose

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Storage

Consult your pharmacist or physician.

Do not flush medications down the toilet or pour them into a drain unless instructed to do so. Properly discard this product when it is expired or no longer needed. Consult your pharmacist or local waste disposal company for more details about how to safely discard your product.

Information last revised July 2016. Copyright(c) 2016 First Databank, Inc.

www.webmd.com

A librarian’s choice of the best of the Web

The Invisible Web What is the Invisible Web? How can you find it online? What makes the Invisible Web search engines and Invisible Web databases so special? Find out the answers to these questions and learn more about this section of the Web that’s so much larger than what you can uncover with an ordinary Web search.

28 other alternatives Well, we’ve all seen the news that the single most insane idea of the year award can go to Yahoo who are apparently going to be closing Delicious. Quite why they’re not prepared to ask people to pay for access, or even to offer it to someone like the Library of Congress to take over defeats me, but clearly straightforward thinking isn’t their forte else they wouldn’t be taking this stupid step in the first place. So, if you want to choose a different bookmarking resource, what options are available to you? The good news is that there’s quite a lot.

Story Structure 104: The Juicy Details — Channel 101 Wiki By Dan Harmon Okay, here’s that part where the self appointed guru tells you exactly what needs to happen and when. I hope I’ve made it clear to you before I do that that the REAL structure of any good story is simply circular — a descent into the unknown and eventual return — and that any specific descriptions of that process are specific to you and your story. Fixed vs. Growth: The Two Basic Mindsets That Shape Our Lives by Maria Popova How to fine-tune the internal monologue that scores every aspect of our lives, from leadership to love. “If you imagine less, less will be what you undoubtedly deserve,” Debbie Millman counseled in one of the best commencement speeches ever given, urging: “Do what you love, and don’t stop until you get what you love. Work as hard as you can, imagine immensities…” Far from Pollyanna platitude, this advice actually reflects what modern psychology knows about how belief systems about our own abilities and potential fuel our behavior and predict our success.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY : YESTERDAY, TODAY AND TOMORROW Delhi February 19, 2015 – February 21, 2015 The International Conference on Information Technology: yesterday, today, and tomorrow, aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results about all aspects of information technology. It also provides the premier interdisciplinary forum for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, concerns, practical challenges encountered, and the solutions adopted in the fi eld of information technology. सूचना प्रौद्योगिकीः कल आज और कल नामक अंतर्राष्ट्रीय सम्मेलन का उद्देश्य शिक्षाविदों, वैज्ञानिकों, शोधकर्ताओं, तथा विद्वानों के मध्य परस्पर विचार-विमर्श, उनके द्वारा किए गए शोध पर परिचर्चा, तथा नवीन विधाओं का सृजन है।

OAIster [OCLC — Digital Collection Services] Access to OAIster A freely-accessible site for searching only OAIster records is available at Additionally, OAIster records are fully accessible through WorldCat.org, and will be included in WorldCat.org search results along with records from thousands of libraries worldwide. They will also continue to be available on the OCLC FirstSearch service to Base Package subscribers, providing another valuable access point for this rich database and a complement to other FirstSearch databases. Contributing to OAIster OAIster continues to grow and expand. In order to support ongoing expansion, OCLC has transitioned the OAIster database to being included in WorldCat and we are transitioning metadata harvesting to the WorldCat Digital Collection Gateway beginning in July 2010.

100 Search Engines For Academic Research Back in 2010, we shared with you 100 awesome search engines and research resources in our post: 100 Time-Saving Search Engines for Serious Scholars. It’s been an incredible resource, but now, it’s time for an update. Some services have moved on, others have been created, and we’ve found some new discoveries, too. Many of our original 100 are still going strong, but we’ve updated where necessary and added some of our new favorites, too. 30 Different Ways To Tie A Tie That Every Man Should Know The following blog is an excerpt from a feature originally published on ShirtsMyWay. Here is a list of many different ways to tie a tie, for every and any occasion, many of which you probably never knew existed. We’ve gathered 30 of the best tie knots ever created by mankind to give you just the edge you need to look your best at all times. Each tie knot has been judged on four different factors: aesthetics, symmetry, difficulty, and knot size. You can make a statement with these knots any day of the week or simply use them to look elegant and stylish during those special events where you really need to stand out.

How to Train Your Brain to Stay Focused As an entrepreneur, you have a lot on your plate. Staying focused can be tough with a constant stream of employees, clients, emails, and phone calls demanding your attention. Amid the noise, understanding your brain’s limitations and working around them can improve your focus and increase your productivity. Our brains are finely attuned to distraction, so today’s digital environment makes it especially hard to focus.

www.pearltrees.com

Next Choice

Generic Name: levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive (LEE voe nor jes trel)
Brand Name: EContra EZ, Fallback Solo, My Way, Next Choice, Opcicon One-Step, Plan B One-Step, React

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Oct 19, 2018 – Written by Cerner Multum

What is Next Choice?

Next Choice is used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex or failure of other forms of birth control (such as condom breakage, or missing 2 or more birth control pills).

Next Choice may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important Information

Next Choice will not terminate pregnancy if the fertilized egg has already attached to the uterus.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before taking levonorgestrel if you regularly use medication for seizures, tuberculosis, or HIV/AIDS. Certain other medicines can make levonorgestrel less effective.

Before taking this medicine

Do not use this medicine if you are already pregnant. Next Choice will not terminate a pregnancy that has already begun (the fertilized egg has attached to the uterus).

Next Choice is not approved for use by anyone younger than 17 years old.

You should not use levonorgestrel if you are allergic to it.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist before taking levonorgestrel if you regularly use medication for seizures, tuberculosis, or HIV/AIDS. Certain medications can make levonorgestrel less effective as an emergency form of contraception.

Next Choice is not intended for use as a routine form of birth control and should not be used in this manner. Talk with your doctor about the many forms of birth control available.

Levonorgestrel may slow breast milk production. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.

How should I take Next Choice?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor.

Next Choice must be taken as soon as possible after unprotected sex (no later than 72 hours afterward).

Call your doctor right away if you vomit within 2 hours after taking Next Choice. Do not take a second dose without first asking your doctor.

Visit your doctor within 3 weeks after taking Next Choice. A doctor should confirm that you are not pregnant, and that this medicine has not caused any harmful effects.

If your period is late by 1 week or longer after the expected date, you may be pregnant. Get a pregnancy test and contact your doctor if you are pregnant. Next Choice will not terminate pregnancy if the fertilized egg has attached to the uterus.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since Next Choice is used as a single dose, it does not have a daily dosing schedule.

What happens if I overdose?

Because Next Choice is supplied as a single tablet in an exact strength, an overdose is unlikely to occur when the levonorgestrel is used as directed. Do not take more than one tablet at the same time.

What should I avoid while taking Next Choice?

Next Choice will not protect you from sexually transmitted diseases—including HIV and AIDS. Using a condom is the only way to protect yourself from these diseases. Avoid having unprotected sex.

Next Choice side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor or seek emergency medical help if you have severe pain in your lower stomach or side. This could be a sign of a tubal pregnancy (a pregnancy that implants in the fallopian tube instead of the uterus). A tubal pregnancy is a medical emergency.

Common side effects may include:

mild stomach pain;

breast pain or tenderness;

feeling tired; or

changes in your menstrual periods.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

See also:

What other drugs will affect Next Choice?

Certain other medications can make Next Choice less effective, which may result in pregnancy. Ask a doctor or pharmacist if Next Choice is safe to use if you are using any of the following medications:

This list is not complete. Other drugs may affect levonorgestrel, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

See also:

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2018 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 3.02.

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