Vinegar from aphids

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What’s your favorite way of killing these pests? I’ve become such a lazy gardener. I thought my plants were ailing because I wasn’t watering them enough, then my high school horticulture lessons hit me last night. Would you believe that I aced that class? Looking at my tomato crop right now, I certainly wouldn’t!

Anywho, here’s a list of suggestions from Yahoo Voices. I’ve gone over my plants with the vinegar solution, I’ve been wanting to plant garlic, and I think I’ll give the tin/aluminum/aluminium foil a try. And can anyone here vouch for the banana peel method?

I’m gonna go shower, now. I’m sure it’s all in my head, but I can still feel the buggers crawling all over me. >_<

Natural Aphid Pesticides: Neem Oil
Pure neem oil, an oil derived from the neem tree, has long been used in many natural remedies, including pest control. The oil, or Azadirachtin, acts as a repellent and growth regulator. To the insects, the neem oil has a bitter taste, so they will not eat the leaves treated with it. Also, if the insects do come in contact with the Azadirachtin, it prevents the larvae from growing into adults. Neem oil can be purchased at various online stores or made from neem trees.

Natural Aphid Pesticides: Homemade Lemon Spray
This natural aphid pesticide works as an instant remedy, killing the aphids on contact. To make this natural pesticide, grate the rind of a large lemon. Boil it in enough water to fill a garden spray bottle. Let the mixture sit overnight. Drain the liquid into the garden spray bottle. Spray the aphids and larvae directly. It will cause them to convulse.

Natural Aphid Pesticides: Homemade Vinegar Spray
Get out a spray bottle and fill it 1/3 of the way with distilled white vinegar and the rest of the way with water. This will kill the aphids and larvae on contact.

Natural Aphid Pesticides: Aluminum Foil
Place a square of aluminum foil around the base of plants affected by aphids. This causes light to bounce around to the underside of the leaves, which repels the aphids. It is also good for the plants, as it brings them more natural sunlight.

Natural Aphid Pesticides: Calcium Powder
Sprinkling calcium powder around the base of the plants is another natural aphid repellent. The aphids do not like the calcium and will generally stay away from it.

Natural Aphid Pesticides: Yellow Plastic Bowl
Aphids are naturally attracted to the color yellow. Place a yellow plastic bowl filled about 1/3 of the way with water in the center of the infested area. Many of the aphids will be drawn to the bowl and will go into the water and die.

Natural Aphid Pesticides: Banana Peels
Burying shredded banana peels around the base of plants is an odd, but effective remedy. It has been around for ages and many gardeners will swear by it.

Natural Aphid Pesticides: Smash Their Buddies
Squashing a few aphids near the infested area will signify to the other aphids that it is time to go. It’s a chemical reaction.

Natural Aphid Pesticides: Ladybugs
Ladybugs can be purchased at garden and home improvement centers. The ladybugs feed on the aphids and if you purchase enough, the aphids will be gone in no time. Ladybugs are also good for the garden in other ways.

Natural Aphid Pesticides: Garlic or Onions
Planting garlic or onions is another natural aphid deterrent. They do not like garlic or onion and will not likely come near an area they are in.

The only time I ever had aphids in a big way, they were quickly followed by a surge of ladybugs. Final score:

Ladybugs – 100
Aphids – 0

Try to find some of the little dears.

Ants often place aphids on the plants, putting them ‘out to pasture’ in a way. Deter the ants, the aphids will decline in numbers.

My mother used to use the foil mulch with summer squash, but I’m not sure how well it worked.

Make the water in the yellow bowl soapy water, and it will work better. 🙂

8SqueakyChu

The trouble is, most of the ladybugs flew away.

Yeah, but think of all the good you’re doing to your neighbors’ gardens. 🙂

Ladybugs eat aphids in their larval stage too. You will see these little black wormish sort of things, with red or orange markings. Don’t kill them!

Here’s some information I found for you, about ladybugs:

After receiving your package of live ladybugs, leave the bag sealed and place them in a refrigerator, or other cool place. This calms ladybugs down from their shipping experience. Early evening is the best time to release ladybugs, and gives them all night to settle in, find food and water, and realize they’ve found a good home (your garden). Ladybugs are usually thirsty from their long journey and storage, and appreciate moist places to drink. If necessary, sprinkle some water around first before their release. Later on, they’ll get most of their moisture needs from eating aphids and other “juicy” plant pests.

Ladybugs like having large pest populations to eat, which helps stimulate them to mate and lay eggs. When food is harder to find, adult ladybugs may fly off, but their eggs then hatch and provide further control. (Both adults and larvae feed on insect pests.) If desired, you can keep ladybug adults from flying by “gluing” their wings shut, temporarily, with a sugar-water solution. Half water and half sugared pop (Coke, Pepsi, etc.), in a spray bottle, works fine. Spray it right in the bag the ladybugs come in, as soon as you open it. You’ll easily coat most of them. After a week or so, the “glue” wears off.

What do ladybug eggs and larvae look like? Their eggs look like clusters of little orange footballs, each laid on edge. After hatching, they’ll look like tiny black “alligators”, with orange spots. Extremely fast moving, they grow to 1/2″ long over 2-3 weeks, then pupate, usually on the top of the leaf, into another adult ladybug. One larvae will eat about 400 medium-size aphids during its development to the pupal stage. An adult ladybug may eat over 5,000 aphids during its lifetime (about a year).

When not being used, ladybugs may be stored in the refrigerator, where they live off their body fat. (Keep the temperature between 35-45° F.) They appear almost dead in the refrigerator, but quickly become active when warmed up. How long can they be stored? Usually 2-3 months, but it depends on the time of year, and some losses can be expected the longer they’re stored. During early spring (March and April) they should be used somewhat sooner, as these are older ladybugs from the previous year. During May, ladybugs should be released immediately. The new ladybug crop comes in about June 1, and these young ladybugs actually seem to benefit from refrigeration 1-2 months – it simulates winter for them. (Note: Modern frost-free refrigerators tend to dry out ladybugs in storage. For prolonged storage, your bags of ladybugs can be misted or sprinkled with water, perhaps every 2-3 weeks. Allow ladybugs to dry at room temperature until moisture is mostly evaporated, then replace ladybugs in refrigerator.) Ladybugs are one of the few insects we sell that are collected in the wild, rather than insectary grown, so we are dependant on their natural lifecycle for collections and storage. We “crawl clean” all Ladybugs before shipping to ensure that only live ones are sent out, although a small loss in shipping is normal.

In order for ladybugs to mature and lay eggs, they need nectar and pollen sources. This is normally supplied by a wide range of sources such as flowering plants and legumes (peas, beans, clover, alfalfa). If desired, you can use Beneficial Insect Food as a pollen substitute.

Suggested release rates for ladybugs vary widely – we’ve seen recommendations varying from 1 gallon (72,000) for 10 acres, up to 3 gallons per acre. You can’t use too many ladybugs, but remember that they do need time to work – ladybugs need to be released early enough in the pest cycle so they can do their job, and regular, repeated releases of small amounts are often for effective than one, very large release of ladybugs. For home use, 1,500 is usually enough for one application in a small greenhouse or garden. For larger areas, a quart (18,000) or gallon (72,000) of ladybugs may be desired. Many people store ladybugs in the refrigerator, and make regular repeat releases, perhaps weekly.

If ladybugs are used indoors or in a greenhouse, screen off any openings to prevent their escape. And, of course, you’ll want to avoid spraying with pesticides, both after release and for at least a month before. (Soapy sprays, such as Safers, are an exception – you can use them right up to the arrival of the ladybugs, and indeed, ladybugs hard outer shell seems to protect them from soapy sprays even afterwards. Botanical pesticides pyrethrin, rotenone, etc. are ok to use if you wait a week before releasing ladybugs.)

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Controlling Aph >By Joan Clark

If you have a vegetable garden, you most likely have aphids, too. The small insect pests, known as “plant lice,” feed off plants by attaching to the leaves or base of the entire plant and suck out the nutrients, causing the plant to wither, yellow or curl at the leaves.

Aphid populations reproduce so quickly that by the time you figure out the problem, they’ve already infested your garden and potentially infected your plants and rose bushes with lethal viruses.

You can fight off these natural predators with a homemade aphid spray, but the question is how to make them yourself. Using something as simple as liquid dish soap, you can get rid of these apex rose killers today.

Homemade Sprays vs. Chemical Sprays

Some people choose to plant gardens full of beneficial fruits and vegetables to feed their families. Using chemical pesticides to remove pests would negate any health benefits hoping to be gained.

Others might plant flowers that they use to create a fragrant home, potentially transferring harmful chemicals from the garden to their home. Numerous natural and organic substances can be mixed to form a natural aphid spray to kill invasive aphids, lace bugs, and parasitic wasps.

Homemade Aphid Spray Recipes

Soap and Water

A few tablespoons of liquid dish or insecticidal soap diluted in a pint of water is the simplest way to make a natural aphid killer spray for that aphid infestation. After mixing the water and soap mixture, fill up a squirt bottle, take a dish sponge and head out to your garden.

Your first thought might be to indiscriminately spray all the plants in your garden with the dish soap spray bottle. However, doing so will kill any beneficial insects along with the aphids.

Instead, to control aphids but not lose your good bugs, spray the soapy water onto the sponge and gently wipe it on the leaves of the plants. Be sure to check underneath the plant leaves for eggs and larvae.

Castile soap is a versatile all-natural, vegetable-based liquid soap with olive and mineral oil as the main ingredients. When combined with vinegar and water, Castile makes a DIY natural aphid spray. The vinegar deters future garden pests from invading your new growth.

Organic Pesticide – Vinegar Aphid Spray Recipe

  • 1 tablespoon Castile Soap
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 1 gallon of water

Like dishwashing soap, vinegar is lethal to all insects, whether they are the Japanese species of aphids you are trying to get rid of or the good bugs you need in your garden. Use a spray bottle to spray the tops and bottoms of the leaves lightly.

Pure and organic neem oil can be used to repel aphids, cabbage worms, other pests, as well as help control any fungi they transfer into your garden. Simply mix neem oil for plants with a quart of water.

Once you dilute the neem oil, use a garden hose sprayer to mist your garden with the mixture in the early morning. Neem oil doesn’t have any harmful effects on beneficial insects, but it does help in repelling aphids, mosquitos, and other pests.

Essential Oils

Essential oils have long been used in aromatherapy but are recently becoming popular in many aspects of the home, including pest control for gardens. A mixture of thyme, peppermint, cloves and rosemary oils create a potent mix that will kill and repel aphids.

If you have outdoor or stray cats who routinely enter your garden, peppermint oil is one of the essential oils that are known to be potentially toxic to cats. On the other hand, cats dislike the scent of rosemary, which can make it a digging deterrent.

Tomato Leaf Spray

Toxic compounds called alkaloids are found in the leaves of tomato plants. These tomato leaves can be chopped, soaked in water overnight, drained and diluted with water in a spray bottle to create a natural aphid killer.

Unless you are allergic to tomatoes, this recipe isn’t dangerous for humans or plants. Directly spray the leaves and undersides of plants in your garden to kill the harmful plant lice.

Garlic Oil Spray

Garlic isn’t just used to repel vampires. The sulfur in garlic is toxic to pests. It also kills ladybugs and other beneficial insects. For that reason, this garlic-based natural aphid spray should only be used if you don’t have any essential bugs in your garden.

Garlic Oil Natural Aphid Killer

  • Several cloves of garlic, minced
  • 4 teaspoons of vegetable oil
  • 1 pint of water
  • 1 teaspoon dish detergent
  • Spray bottle

Add garlic to the vegetable oil and let it infuse for 24 hours. Strain the garlic and add oil to water and dish detergent. Mix well and spray on bugs for a natural aphid killer.

Getting Rid of Spider Mites

Spider mites are another tiny pest that can cause big problems in your garden. If the leaves of your plants are dry, brittle or falling off, you might be dealing with a spider mite infestation. The insects are tiny and cause immense damage to healthy plants quickly by poking holes in the leaves and extracting the water and nutrients that are the lifeline for your plants.

Neem oil is one practical solution for getting rid of spider mites. Follow the directions above by diluting neem oil with water and spraying on the leaves and the undersides of leaves to repel the mites.

Homemade Aphid Control – Prevention

As Ben Franklin said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” He was talking about fire safety, but it is often applied to health safety. Or in this case, garden safety. There are a few things you can do to prevent invasive insects such as aphids or spider mites from infesting your garden.

Attract Favorable Bugs

Lady beetles and lacewings are two insects that feed on aphids. Introducing them to your garden is a natural selection way to combating their infestations while keeping the beneficial bugs safe from chemical pesticides.

There are two main ways to get the “good” bugs; acquire them at gardening stores or turn your garden into a habitat with an ample supply of nectar to attract the helpful kind of insects.

Apply Dormant Oil

Dormant oil is a mixture of several oils and water that is applied to plants during their dormant season to repel aphids after the wintering is over. The mixture shouldn’t harm beneficial insects because they won’t be the plants during the inactive phase.

www.tipsbulletin.com

Controlling Aph >By Joan Clark

If you have a vegetable garden, you most likely have aphids, too. The small insect pests, known as “plant lice,” feed off plants by attaching to the leaves or base of the entire plant and suck out the nutrients, causing the plant to wither, yellow or curl at the leaves.

Aphid populations reproduce so quickly that by the time you figure out the problem, they’ve already infested your garden and potentially infected your plants and rose bushes with lethal viruses.

You can fight off these natural predators with a homemade aphid spray, but the question is how to make them yourself. Using something as simple as liquid dish soap, you can get rid of these apex rose killers today.

Homemade Sprays vs. Chemical Sprays

Some people choose to plant gardens full of beneficial fruits and vegetables to feed their families. Using chemical pesticides to remove pests would negate any health benefits hoping to be gained.

Others might plant flowers that they use to create a fragrant home, potentially transferring harmful chemicals from the garden to their home. Numerous natural and organic substances can be mixed to form a natural aphid spray to kill invasive aphids, lace bugs, and parasitic wasps.

Homemade Aphid Spray Recipes

Soap and Water

A few tablespoons of liquid dish or insecticidal soap diluted in a pint of water is the simplest way to make a natural aphid killer spray for that aphid infestation. After mixing the water and soap mixture, fill up a squirt bottle, take a dish sponge and head out to your garden.

Your first thought might be to indiscriminately spray all the plants in your garden with the dish soap spray bottle. However, doing so will kill any beneficial insects along with the aphids.

Instead, to control aphids but not lose your good bugs, spray the soapy water onto the sponge and gently wipe it on the leaves of the plants. Be sure to check underneath the plant leaves for eggs and larvae.

Castile soap is a versatile all-natural, vegetable-based liquid soap with olive and mineral oil as the main ingredients. When combined with vinegar and water, Castile makes a DIY natural aphid spray. The vinegar deters future garden pests from invading your new growth.

Organic Pesticide – Vinegar Aphid Spray Recipe

  • 1 tablespoon Castile Soap
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 1 gallon of water

Like dishwashing soap, vinegar is lethal to all insects, whether they are the Japanese species of aphids you are trying to get rid of or the good bugs you need in your garden. Use a spray bottle to spray the tops and bottoms of the leaves lightly.

Pure and organic neem oil can be used to repel aphids, cabbage worms, other pests, as well as help control any fungi they transfer into your garden. Simply mix neem oil for plants with a quart of water.

Once you dilute the neem oil, use a garden hose sprayer to mist your garden with the mixture in the early morning. Neem oil doesn’t have any harmful effects on beneficial insects, but it does help in repelling aphids, mosquitos, and other pests.

Essential Oils

Essential oils have long been used in aromatherapy but are recently becoming popular in many aspects of the home, including pest control for gardens. A mixture of thyme, peppermint, cloves and rosemary oils create a potent mix that will kill and repel aphids.

If you have outdoor or stray cats who routinely enter your garden, peppermint oil is one of the essential oils that are known to be potentially toxic to cats. On the other hand, cats dislike the scent of rosemary, which can make it a digging deterrent.

Tomato Leaf Spray

Toxic compounds called alkaloids are found in the leaves of tomato plants. These tomato leaves can be chopped, soaked in water overnight, drained and diluted with water in a spray bottle to create a natural aphid killer.

Unless you are allergic to tomatoes, this recipe isn’t dangerous for humans or plants. Directly spray the leaves and undersides of plants in your garden to kill the harmful plant lice.

Garlic Oil Spray

Garlic isn’t just used to repel vampires. The sulfur in garlic is toxic to pests. It also kills ladybugs and other beneficial insects. For that reason, this garlic-based natural aphid spray should only be used if you don’t have any essential bugs in your garden.

Garlic Oil Natural Aphid Killer

  • Several cloves of garlic, minced
  • 4 teaspoons of vegetable oil
  • 1 pint of water
  • 1 teaspoon dish detergent
  • Spray bottle

Add garlic to the vegetable oil and let it infuse for 24 hours. Strain the garlic and add oil to water and dish detergent. Mix well and spray on bugs for a natural aphid killer.

Getting Rid of Spider Mites

Spider mites are another tiny pest that can cause big problems in your garden. If the leaves of your plants are dry, brittle or falling off, you might be dealing with a spider mite infestation. The insects are tiny and cause immense damage to healthy plants quickly by poking holes in the leaves and extracting the water and nutrients that are the lifeline for your plants.

Neem oil is one practical solution for getting rid of spider mites. Follow the directions above by diluting neem oil with water and spraying on the leaves and the undersides of leaves to repel the mites.

Homemade Aphid Control – Prevention

As Ben Franklin said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” He was talking about fire safety, but it is often applied to health safety. Or in this case, garden safety. There are a few things you can do to prevent invasive insects such as aphids or spider mites from infesting your garden.

Attract Favorable Bugs

Lady beetles and lacewings are two insects that feed on aphids. Introducing them to your garden is a natural selection way to combating their infestations while keeping the beneficial bugs safe from chemical pesticides.

There are two main ways to get the “good” bugs; acquire them at gardening stores or turn your garden into a habitat with an ample supply of nectar to attract the helpful kind of insects.

Apply Dormant Oil

Dormant oil is a mixture of several oils and water that is applied to plants during their dormant season to repel aphids after the wintering is over. The mixture shouldn’t harm beneficial insects because they won’t be the plants during the inactive phase.

www.tipsbulletin.com

Controlling Aph >By Joan Clark

If you have a vegetable garden, you most likely have aphids, too. The small insect pests, known as “plant lice,” feed off plants by attaching to the leaves or base of the entire plant and suck out the nutrients, causing the plant to wither, yellow or curl at the leaves.

Aphid populations reproduce so quickly that by the time you figure out the problem, they’ve already infested your garden and potentially infected your plants and rose bushes with lethal viruses.

You can fight off these natural predators with a homemade aphid spray, but the question is how to make them yourself. Using something as simple as liquid dish soap, you can get rid of these apex rose killers today.

Homemade Sprays vs. Chemical Sprays

Some people choose to plant gardens full of beneficial fruits and vegetables to feed their families. Using chemical pesticides to remove pests would negate any health benefits hoping to be gained.

Others might plant flowers that they use to create a fragrant home, potentially transferring harmful chemicals from the garden to their home. Numerous natural and organic substances can be mixed to form a natural aphid spray to kill invasive aphids, lace bugs, and parasitic wasps.

Homemade Aphid Spray Recipes

Soap and Water

A few tablespoons of liquid dish or insecticidal soap diluted in a pint of water is the simplest way to make a natural aphid killer spray for that aphid infestation. After mixing the water and soap mixture, fill up a squirt bottle, take a dish sponge and head out to your garden.

Your first thought might be to indiscriminately spray all the plants in your garden with the dish soap spray bottle. However, doing so will kill any beneficial insects along with the aphids.

Instead, to control aphids but not lose your good bugs, spray the soapy water onto the sponge and gently wipe it on the leaves of the plants. Be sure to check underneath the plant leaves for eggs and larvae.

Castile soap is a versatile all-natural, vegetable-based liquid soap with olive and mineral oil as the main ingredients. When combined with vinegar and water, Castile makes a DIY natural aphid spray. The vinegar deters future garden pests from invading your new growth.

Organic Pesticide – Vinegar Aphid Spray Recipe

  • 1 tablespoon Castile Soap
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 1 gallon of water

Like dishwashing soap, vinegar is lethal to all insects, whether they are the Japanese species of aphids you are trying to get rid of or the good bugs you need in your garden. Use a spray bottle to spray the tops and bottoms of the leaves lightly.

Pure and organic neem oil can be used to repel aphids, cabbage worms, other pests, as well as help control any fungi they transfer into your garden. Simply mix neem oil for plants with a quart of water.

Once you dilute the neem oil, use a garden hose sprayer to mist your garden with the mixture in the early morning. Neem oil doesn’t have any harmful effects on beneficial insects, but it does help in repelling aphids, mosquitos, and other pests.

Essential Oils

Essential oils have long been used in aromatherapy but are recently becoming popular in many aspects of the home, including pest control for gardens. A mixture of thyme, peppermint, cloves and rosemary oils create a potent mix that will kill and repel aphids.

If you have outdoor or stray cats who routinely enter your garden, peppermint oil is one of the essential oils that are known to be potentially toxic to cats. On the other hand, cats dislike the scent of rosemary, which can make it a digging deterrent.

Tomato Leaf Spray

Toxic compounds called alkaloids are found in the leaves of tomato plants. These tomato leaves can be chopped, soaked in water overnight, drained and diluted with water in a spray bottle to create a natural aphid killer.

Unless you are allergic to tomatoes, this recipe isn’t dangerous for humans or plants. Directly spray the leaves and undersides of plants in your garden to kill the harmful plant lice.

Garlic Oil Spray

Garlic isn’t just used to repel vampires. The sulfur in garlic is toxic to pests. It also kills ladybugs and other beneficial insects. For that reason, this garlic-based natural aphid spray should only be used if you don’t have any essential bugs in your garden.

Garlic Oil Natural Aphid Killer

  • Several cloves of garlic, minced
  • 4 teaspoons of vegetable oil
  • 1 pint of water
  • 1 teaspoon dish detergent
  • Spray bottle

Add garlic to the vegetable oil and let it infuse for 24 hours. Strain the garlic and add oil to water and dish detergent. Mix well and spray on bugs for a natural aphid killer.

Getting Rid of Spider Mites

Spider mites are another tiny pest that can cause big problems in your garden. If the leaves of your plants are dry, brittle or falling off, you might be dealing with a spider mite infestation. The insects are tiny and cause immense damage to healthy plants quickly by poking holes in the leaves and extracting the water and nutrients that are the lifeline for your plants.

Neem oil is one practical solution for getting rid of spider mites. Follow the directions above by diluting neem oil with water and spraying on the leaves and the undersides of leaves to repel the mites.

Homemade Aphid Control – Prevention

As Ben Franklin said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” He was talking about fire safety, but it is often applied to health safety. Or in this case, garden safety. There are a few things you can do to prevent invasive insects such as aphids or spider mites from infesting your garden.

Attract Favorable Bugs

Lady beetles and lacewings are two insects that feed on aphids. Introducing them to your garden is a natural selection way to combating their infestations while keeping the beneficial bugs safe from chemical pesticides.

There are two main ways to get the “good” bugs; acquire them at gardening stores or turn your garden into a habitat with an ample supply of nectar to attract the helpful kind of insects.

Apply Dormant Oil

Dormant oil is a mixture of several oils and water that is applied to plants during their dormant season to repel aphids after the wintering is over. The mixture shouldn’t harm beneficial insects because they won’t be the plants during the inactive phase.

www.tipsbulletin.com

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