Where does grasshopper come from on earth

Where does grasshopper come from on earth

The name Grasshopper describes a number of insects that fall under the scientific “suborder” Caelifera, which is in the order Orthoptera. Within this suborder there are over 11,000 species of grasshopper. That’s a lot of types of grasshoppers!

Like all insects the grasshopper has six legs, a head, thorax, and abdomen. It also has an exoskeleton which is a hard outer surface that protects its softer insides. They have two pairs of wings. The back wings are larger while the front wings are small and fairly hard. Their back legs are large helping them to jump.

They are normally brown in color, but they can vary in color including yellowish brown, reddish brown, and light green. Some are even striped.

These insects live all around the world except where it is too cold like the north and south poles. They have adapted to most every habitat including deserts, forests, and grasslands.

What do they eat?

Grasshoppers eat plants, primarily leaves, grasses, and cereal crops. A lot of grasshoppers can eat a lot of food and can cause serious problems for farmers by eating all of their crops.

How do Grasshoppers make noise?

Male grasshoppers will make a singing sound by rubbing a hind leg against one of their hard forewings. The rough leg causes the wing to vibrate and make a sound, almost like a bow playing a violin.

How are they different from Crickets?

Grasshoppers and Crickets are similar insects, both being of the order Orthoptera, but they are different and actually are in different scientific suborders. The main differences may be hard to see:

  • Grasshoppers have shorter antennae than crickets.
  • Grasshoppers make sounds by rubbing their forelegs against their wings, while crickets rub their wings together.
  • Grasshoppers hear with their abdomen, while crickets listen with their legs.
  • Grasshoppers are diurnal (active during the day). Crickets are nocturnal (active during the night).
  • Grasshoppers only eat plants, while crickets will eat other animals and are omnivorous.

What are locusts?

Locusts are a type of grasshopper. They typically live alone, but are famous for forming giant swarms that can swoop down and destroy massive areas of crops.

Fun Facts about Grasshoppers

  • A lot of people around the world eat grasshoppers. They are a good source of protein.
  • They lay eggs that hatch into nymphs. As the nymphs grow into full size adults they will molt many times.
  • The villains in the movie A Bug’s Life by Pixar are grasshoppers.
  • They have many predators including birds, sp >

www.ducksters.com

Ancient species of flying grasshopper found

By Paul Eccleston

12:01AM GMT 14 Mar 2008

A student has identified a new species of flying grasshopper which lived 115m years ago.

Sam Heads, a PhD research student, was examining fossils from a German museum labelled as ‘stick insects’.

But he knew immediately he was in fact looking at an ancient ancestor of the modern grasshopper.

The flying grasshopper belonged to a family called Proscopiidae and survived by acting like a stick which may have led to the insect being wrongly identified.

The newly-discovered insect was about five centimetres long and although now extinct it belonged to a family which still survives and whose common names include jumping sticks, stick grasshoppers and horse-head grasshoppers.

Sam has named the new insect Eoproscopia martilli, after his university mentor Dr Dave Martill who teaches in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of Portsmouth.

It is not the first time the young student has unearthed a new species. A new type ofcicada he discovered was named after another tutor Bob Loveridge.

He said: “Discovery is by far one of the most satisfying aspects of doing science. It is very exciting. I realised immediately that they were the first-ever fossils of this fascinating family of grasshoppers and basically just sat staring at them down the microscope for the rest of the day.

‘The findings extend the geological range of the Proscopiidae back almost 120m years into the time of the dinosaurs and allow us to glimpse into the distant and otherwise unknown evolutionary past of the family.

‘I have spent the last five years researching fossil insects and identifying specimens becomes second nature.’

Eoproscopia martilli was primitive with a short head and well developed wings while its descendants have elongated heads and have either lost their wings or seen them evolve into mere stumps or tiny winglets.

This family of grasshopper is common in Central and South America and unlike its closest British relative which can be heard singing through the summer, they have no ears and do not sing.

The student said: “Proscopiids are stick mimics and it’s likely that becoming a better stick requires significant reduction of the wings. Once the wings become too small for flight, they could easily be lost through natural selection.

“To avoid predators the young grasshoppers sway back and forth or walk in a spasmodic fashion to try and mimic a stick blowing in the wind.’

Details of the discovery will be published in Palaeontology journal on March 14.

www.telegraph.co.uk

What Makes Grasshoppers Swarm?

Similar to the foreboding locusts warned about in the Bible, grasshoppers can also swarm, wiping out entire crops in agricultural areas and devastating farming economies.

Grasshoppers and locusts are closely related, but while all locusts can fly, some species of grasshoppers do not have wings and are therefore earthbound. There are more than 10,000 known species of grasshoppers, according to the the Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Most species of grasshoppers have wings and can fly pretty well, using their large hind jumping legs as a booster to propel them into the air, where they spread their wings and take off, according to the USDA. Other grasshopper species simply do not develop wings.

Some grasshoppers can be major crop pests, such as the two-striped grasshopper, which is prevalent in North America and can completely destroy crops during a swarming outbreak, according to the USDA.

Both locusts and grasshoppers can enter what scientists call “a gregarious state.” An increase in the chemical serotonin (which boosts moods in humans) may trigger this swarming state, according to a study in the journal Science.

Weather conditions impact swarming patterns, according to the USDA. For instance, two-striped grasshoppers swarm to migrate in search of food strictly between the hours of 10 a.m. and 6 p.m., if there are clear skies and temperature has risen to at least 75 degrees Fahrenheit (24 degrees Celsius).

Not only punctual, a swarm of locusts or grasshoppers is also very structured. A single grasshopper flying along follows its own random path, but when approached by a dense group of flying grasshoppers, it joins their formation and flies in an organized way as a member of the swarm.

In this way, swarming brings order to the grasshoppers’ individual chaotic flying patterns, also providing them with strength in numbers as they gather around dwindling patches of vegetation during dry seasons or simultaneously fly off to escape predators.

This natural system of “collective motion,” which spells doom for a crop, is also common among ants, birds and fish.

www.livescience.com

10 Fascinating Facts About Grasshoppers

Find Out More About These Amazing Insects That Predate Dinosaurs

Jim Simmen / Getty Images

Animals & Nature

Famed fable writer Aesop portrayed the grasshopper as a ne’er do well who fiddled away his summer days without a thought to the future but in the real world, the destruction wreaked by grasshoppers on farming and ranching is far from a harmless parable. Although grasshoppers are extremely common, there’s more to these summertime critters than meets the eye. Here’s a list of 10 fascinating grasshopper-related facts.

1. Grasshoppers and Locusts Are One and the Same

When we think of grasshoppers, most people recall pleasant childhood memories of trying to catch the jumping insects in meadows or backyards. Say the word locusts, however, and it brings to mind images of historic plagues raining down destruction on crops and devouring every plant in sight.

Truth be told, grasshoppers and locusts are members of the same insect order. While certain species are commonly referred to grasshoppers and others as locusts, both creatures are short-horned members of the order Orthoptera. Jumping herbivores with shorter antennae are grouped into the suborder Caelifera, while their longer-horned brethren (crickets and katydids) belong to the suborder Ensifera.

2. Grasshoppers Have Ears on Their Bellies

The grasshopper’s auditory organs are found not on the head, but rather, on the abdomen. A pair of membranes that vibrate in response to sound waves are located one on either side of the first abdominal segment, tucked under the wings. This simple eardrum, called a tympanal organ, allows the grasshopper to hear the songs of its fellow grasshoppers.

3. Although Grasshoppers Can Hear, They Can’t Distinguish Pitch Very Well

As with most insects, the grasshopper’s auditory organs are simple structures. They can detect differences in intensity and rhythm, but not pitch. The male grasshopper’s song isn’t particularly melodic which is a good thing since females don’t care whether or not a fellow can carry a tune. Each species of grasshopper produces a characteristic rhythm that distinguishes its song from others and enables courting males and females of a given species to find one another.

4. Grasshoppers Make Music by Stridulating or Crepitating

If you’re not familiar with those terms, don’t worry. It’s not all that complicated. Most grasshoppers stridulate, which simply means that they rub their hind legs against their forewings to produce their trademark tunes. Special pegs on the inside of the hind leg act like a percussion instrument of sorts when they come in contact with the thickened edge of the wing. The band-winged grasshoppers crepitate or loudly snap their wings as they fly.

5. Grasshoppers Catapult Themselves Into the Air

If you’ve ever tried to catch a grasshopper, you know how far they can jump to flee danger. If humans could jump the way grasshoppers do, we would be able to easily leap the length of a football field. How do these insects jump so far? It’s all in those big, back legs. A grasshopper’s hind legs function like miniature catapults. In preparation for a jump, the grasshopper contracts its large flexor muscles slowly, bending its hind legs at the knee joint. A special piece of cuticle within the knee acts as a spring, storing up all the potential energy. The grasshopper then relaxes its leg muscles, allowing the spring to release its energy and fling the insect into the air.

6. Grasshoppers Can Fly

Because grasshoppers have such powerful jumping legs, people sometimes don’t realize that they also have wings. Grasshoppers use their jumping ability to give them a boost into the air but most are pretty strong fliers and make good use of their wings to escape predators.

7. Grasshoppers Cause Billions of Dollars in Damage to Food Crops Annually

One lone grasshopper can’t do too much harm, although it eats about half its body weight in plants each dayโ€”but when locusts swarm, their combined feeding habits can completely defoliate a landscape, leaving farmers without crops and people without food. In the U.S. alone, grasshoppers cause about $1.5 billion in damage to grazing lands each year. In 1954, a swarm of Desert locusts (Schistocerca gregaria) consumed over 75 square miles of wild and cultivated plants in Kenya.

8. Grasshoppers Are an Important Source of Protein

People have been consuming locusts and grasshoppers for centuries. According to the Bible, John the Baptist ate locusts and honey in the wilderness. Locusts and grasshoppers are a regular dietary component in local diets in many areas of Africa, Asia, and the Americasโ€”and since they’re packed with protein, they’re an important nutritional staple as well.

9. Grasshoppers Existed Long Before Dinosaurs

Modern-day grasshoppers descend from ancient ancestors that lived long before dinosaurs roamed the Earth. The fossil record shows that primitive grasshoppers first appeared during the Carboniferous period, more than 300 million years ago. Most ancient grasshoppers are preserved as fossils, although grasshopper nymphs (the second stage in the grasshopper lifestyle after the initial egg phase) are occasionally found in amber.

10. Grasshoppers May “Spit” Liquid to Defend Themselves

If you’ve ever handled grasshoppers, you’ve probably had a few of them spit brown liquid on you in protest. Scientists believe this behavior is a means of self-defense, and the liquid helps the insects repel predators. Some people say grasshoppers spit “tobacco juice,” probably because historically, grasshoppers have been associated with tobacco crops. Rest assured, however, the grasshoppers aren’t using you as a spittoon.

www.thoughtco.com

What is the Difference Between Grasshoppers and Locusts?

Green grasshoppers and brown locusts are close relatives of one another.

Grasshoppers and locusts are closely related insects both in the Acrididae family. Locusts are in fact, grasshoppers which develop gregarious behaviors under optimum environmental conditions which involve the presence of large populations of grasshoppers. Locusts are not themselves a species. The two insects are primarily herbivores feeding on any green matter they come across and are sometimes agricultural pests when they land in farms. Grasshoppers and locusts have had interactions with human beings since early times and have been mentioned both in the Quran and in the Bible. The two are often used as a delicacy across many communities of the world providing a source of protein.

What Are Grasshoppers?

Grasshoppers are ground dwelling insects which go through a phase of incomplete metamorphosis before developing into the adult stage. As grasshoppers mostly occupy the ground, they have very powerful hind legs which are adapted for escape in case they are threatened. Grasshoppers are closely similar to locusts though grasshoppers can only fly for shorter distances. Grasshoppers mostly exist within a solitary phase with little to no threat to crops. Within the solitary phase, grasshoppers are disorganized, each leading its way of life. However, some grasshopper species develop gregarious behavior under suitable conditions becoming more like locusts.

What Are Locusts?

Locusts are grasshoppers which develop gregarious characteristics in suitable environmental conditions forming an organized group. Such conditions are particularly driven by a period of dense vegetative growth after drought. Drought drives locusts to crowd in small areas where there is vegetation. Locusts then abandon their solitary phase as grasshoppers and reproduce at dramatically high rates forming bands of nymphs and swarms as adults. The transition from the solitary phase is triggered by the secretion of hormone serotonin which has been linked to boosting moods in humans. In their swarms, locusts move in a single direction making stopovers on any green area they notice. This movement causes extensive damage to crops. Locusts are known to cover long distances in short time periods leaving behind a trail of damage.

A swarm of locusts.

Structural Differences Between Locusts And Grasshoppers

Though similar in appearance, grasshoppers differ structurally from the locust. Both species have similar morphological structures whose major difference occurs when locust become gregarious. In grasshoppers, the front wings are thin and tough while the outer wings are wide and flexible. In locusts, the wings become longer and stronger to allow for long distance flights. The body of locusts are smaller than that of grasshoppers. In their solitary states, female locusts are larger than their male counterparts, although their sizes do decrease in the swarming phase.

Behavioral Differences Between Locusts And Grasshoppers

Grasshoppers are primarily solitary creatures throughout their lives, coming together only for reproduction. Though locusts may be found in isolation, they mostly occur in groups in which they forage, bask and roost. Grasshoppers are relatively sedentary species maintaining the same habitat for long periods of time. Grasshoppers only move when threatened and during feeding. Locusts, however, are migratory species often shifting from one area to the next in search of food. Even in their solitary states, locusts are still known to fly over long distances.

Human Interactions With Locusts And Grasshoppers

Grasshoppers and locusts are popular species among humans especially as a source of food. However, they are infamous for mass destruction of crops โ€“ a problem that has plagued farmers for centuries. Swarms of locusts are often a bad omen for farmers and have resulted in several droughts in areas where they land. As a countermeasure, scientists have developed the use of pesticides as well as biological control methods to manage the species.

www.worldatlas.com

Grasshopper

Grasshoppers are herbivorous insects of the suborder Caelifera in the order Orthoptera. To distinguish them from bush crickets or katydids, they are sometimes referred to as short-horned grasshoppers. Species that change colour and behaviour at high population densities are called locusts.

A Grasshopper is an amazing insect that can leap 20 times the length of its own body. If you or I could do that, we would be able to jump almost 40 yards!

A Grasshopper does not actually โ€˜jumpโ€™. What they do is use their legs as a catapult. Grasshoppers can both jump and fly and they can reach a speed of 8 miles per hour when flying. There are about 18,000 different species of grasshoppers.

Grasshopper Characteristics

Grasshoppers are medium to large insects. Adult length is 1 to 7 centimetres, depending on the species. Like their relatives the โ€˜katydidsโ€™ and โ€˜cricketsโ€™, they have chewing mouthparts, two pairs of wings, one narrow and tough, the other wide and flexible, and long hind legs for jumping. They are different from these groups in having short antennae that do not reach very far back on their bodies.

Grasshoppers usually have large eyes, and are coloured to blend into their environment, usually a combination of brown, grey or green. In some species the males have bright colours on their wings that they use to attract females. A few species eat toxic plants, and keep the toxins in their bodies for protection. They are brightly coloured to warn predators that they taste bad.

Female grasshoppers are larger than the males and have sharp points at the end of their abdomen that are there to help them lay eggs underground. Male grasshoppers sometimes have special structures on their wings that they rub their hind legs on or rub together to make sounds.

Grasshoppers can be found almost everywhere in the world, except for the colder regions near the North and South poles.

Types of Grasshopper

There are two main groups of grasshoppers:

(1) long-horned grasshoppers

(2) short-horned grasshoppers

Grasshoppers are divided according to the length of their antennae (feelers), which are also called horns. Short-horned grasshoppers are usually called โ€˜locustsโ€™.

Grasshopper Habitat and Grasshopper Diet

Grasshoppers live in fields, meadows and just about anywhere they can find generous amounts of food to eat. A grasshopper has a hard shell and a full grown grasshopper is about one and a half inches, being so small you would not think they would eat much โ€“ but you would be so wrong โ€“ they eat lots and lots โ€“ an average grasshopper can eat 16 time its own weight.

The grasshoppers favourite foods are grasses, leaves and cereal crops. One particular grasshopper โ€“ the Shorthorn grasshopper only eats plants, but it can go berserk and eat every plant in sight โ€“ makes you wander where they put it all.

Grasshopper Behaviour

Grasshoppers are most active during the day, but also feed at night. They do not have nests or territories and some species go on long migrations to find new supplies of food. Most species are solitary and only come together to mate, but the migratory species sometimes gather in huge groups of millions or even billions of individuals.

When a grasshopper is picked up, they โ€˜spitโ€™ a brown liquid which is known as โ€˜tobacco juiceโ€™. Some scientists believe that this liquid may protect grasshoppers from attacks by insects such as ants and other predators โ€“ they โ€˜spitโ€™ the liquid at them then catapult up and fly off quickly.

Grasshoppers also try to escape from their enemies hiding in the grass or among leaves. If you have ever tried to catch grasshoppers in a field, you know how quickly they can disappear by dropping down into the tall grass.

Grasshopper Predators

The grasshoppers greatest enemies include various kinds of flies that lay their eggs in or near grasshopper eggs. After the fly eggs hatch, the newborn flies eat the grasshopper eggs. Some flies will even lay their eggs on the grasshoppers body, even while the grasshopper is flying. The newborn flies then eat the grasshopper. Other enemies of grasshoppers include beetles, birds, mice, snakes and spiders.

animalcorner.co.uk

Grasshopper

Grasshopper Facts

Arthropoda >A group of animals within a pylum Orthoptera Family: Grasshopper Scientific Name: 38-50mm (1.5-2in) Number Of Species: Least Concern Brown, Yellow, Green Skin Type: Fields and meadows Average Litter Size: Grass, Weeds, Shrubs Predators: Birds, Rodents, Reptiles, Insects Special Features: Long, thin antenna and the ability to jump

Grasshopper Location

Grasshopper

The grasshopper is a medium to large sized insect and the grasshopper is found (close to grass) all over the world. Grasshoppers are best known for their ability to jump incredible heights and distances.,

Most grasshopper individuals grow to about 2 inches long although larger grasshoppers are found on a fairly regular basis that grow to more than 5 inches in length. The grasshopper has wings meaning it can migrate over long distances when the weather gets too cold.

There are 11,000 thousand known species of grasshopper on Earth, that live in grassy areas such as fields and meadows and forest and woodland. Like all insects, all species of grasshopper have a three-part body that is made up of the grasshopper’s head, it’s thorax and the abdomen. Grasshoppers also have six legs, two pairs of wings, and two antennae.

The antennae of the grasshopper are known to be remarkably long and can often be longer than the grasshopper’s body, although the grasshopper’s antennae and the grasshopper’s body are normally about the same size. Grasshoppers use their long antennae in order to make sense of their surroundings.

Grasshoppers have six jointed legs that are incredibly powerful for such a small creature, as grasshoppers are able to jump extraordinary distances. The two back legs of the grasshopper are long and powerful and are just for jumping, where the four front legs of the grasshopper are primarily used to hold onto prey and to help it to walk.

Despite their large size, grasshoppers are herbivores animals and have a diet that consists solely of plant matter. Grasshoppers eat grasses, weeds, leaves, shrubs, bark and numerous other species of plants that surround them.

The grasshopper is also a stable food source for many predators around the world including reptiles, insects, small mammals and birds. It is common for humans to eat grasshoppers in places like Asia and Africa where the bigger species of grasshopper are found, and there is a less readily available alternative protein source.

The female grasshopper lays an egg pod that contains a couple of dozen grasshopper eggs in the late autumn to early winter depending on the area. The female grasshopper inserts her egg pod into the soil so that it is a couple of inches underground. The grasshopper eggs can take up to 9 months to hatch as they wait until the weather has warmed before breaking into the outside world.

When the first baby grasshopper (known as a nymph) hatches out of its egg, it tunnels through the soil and up to the surface, and the remaining grasshopper nymph follow. As they get older, the grasshoppers will increase in size until they are adults. The grasshopper only remains in this stage (young and adult) for a few months before it dies meaning that most grasshopper indiv >

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