What do Fleas Look Like — Flea Pictures

What do Fleas Look Like – Flea Pictures

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You probably want to know what fleas look like so you can identify your pest problem and get rid of it. The flea pictures below will show exactly what they look like and help you decide whether or not your home is infested with fleas. New photos are added regularly by our readers and I encourage you to contact me, if you have some flea pictures you want to share with the rest of the world. It would really aid us in the ongoing war against fleas.

Enough talk, so what do fleas look like? Many of these flea pictures were submitted by our readers, so thank you so much for your help, it’s much appreciated.

That’s all the flea pictures we have, but there must be plenty more out there. So if you have some great photos on your camera, or if you’re the creative type who can draw these creatures, then please contact me with what you’ve got. There is the emotional reward of helping in it for you, so if you help others, you’re actually also helping yourself. Don’t believe me? Believe social psychology. Thanks for contributing.

Now you know what fleas look like and if you have identified your pest problem, let’s get rid of the fleas.

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www.fleabites.net

Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Symptoms in Pictures

What Is Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever?

Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF) is an illness caused by infection with the bacterium Rickettsia rickettsia, which is transmitted by a bite from infected ticks.

How Do People Get Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever?

The bacterium Rickettsia rickettsia that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever is transmitted by the bite of an infected tick. The primary vectors (the agents that transmit infection) for RMSF in the U.S. are the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis), the Rocky Mountain wood tick (Dermacentor andersoni), and the brown dog tick (Rhipicephalus sanguineus).

What Are the Symptoms and Signs of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever?

Early symptoms of Rocky Mountain spotted fever usually occur about five to 10 days following the tick bite, and include fever, nausea, vomiting, muscle pain, loss of appetite, and headache. As the disease progresses, symptoms may include rash, abdominal pain, joint pain, and diarrhea. The disease can be severe and most patients need to be hospitalized.

Where Do Most Cases of Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Occur in the U.S.?

The disease was named Rocky Mountain spotted fever as the disease was first discovered in that part of the U.S., however there are few cases in that part of the country today. Most cases of RMSF in the U.S. occur in the southeastern part of the country, including Delaware, Maryland, Washington D.C., Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. The most cases of RMSF are found in North Carolina and Oklahoma. Other than Antarctica, RMSF can be found in nearly all parts of the world. The disease occurs seasonally, mostly from April through September in the US. While anyone can be infected, children under 10 years of age are at highest risk.

How Is Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Diagnosed?

To diagnose Rocky Mountain spotted fever, three things a physician will look for are fever and rash, occurring a few days after a tick bite. One test for RMSF includes a biopsy of the skin rash, and another involves immunofluorescence staining of skin-tissue samples. Treatment usually begins immediately, even before test results come back, as the disease can progress rapidly.

How Is Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Treated?

Treatment for Rocky Mountain spotted fever includes a tetracycline (Achromycin) antibiotic, usually doxycycline (Vibramycin). This is taken per doctor’s instructions until several days after the fever goes away and the patient starts to show signs of improvement. Most patients are treated for five to 10 days, even while waiting for lab test results to come back.

Can a Person Get Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever More Than Once?

It is believed that once a person is infected with R. rickettsia, the bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain spotted fever, they will be immune to contracting it again. However, tick-preventive measures should always be taken, as ticks can transmit other diseases.

How Can Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Be Prevented?

The best way to reduce the chances of getting Rocky Mountain spotted fever is to limit exposure to ticks. If you live in a tick-infested area, promptly remove all crawling or attached ticks. It may take some time to transmit the disease from the tick to the host, so prompt removal is important. While you can’t completely eliminate all exposure to ticks, the following slides discuss preventive measures that can be taken to protect yourself when in tick-infested environments.

Prevention Tip #1: Proper Clothing

Wear light-colored clothing to allow you to more easily see ticks on your clothes.

Prevention Tip #2: Keep Ticks Out

Keep ticks out by tucking your pant legs into your socks so ticks cannot crawl up your legs.

Prevention Tip #3: Apply Repellents

Use repellants to discourage ticks from attaching to you. Permetrin is a repellant that can be sprayed on clothing and shoes that will last several days. DEET (n, n-diethyl-m-toluamide) is a repellant that can be applied directly to the skin, but only lasts a few hours. Use caution when applying DEET to children, as it may cause adverse reactions. Check with your child’s pediatrician about what repellants to use safely on your child.

Prevention Tip #4: Self-Check

When you have been in a tick-infested area, check yourself thoroughly upon return. Use a mirror to view your back and other parts of the body you may not easily see, and promptly remove any ticks you find.

Prevention Tip #5: Check Children and Pets

Check your children and pets for ticks after you have been in a tick-infested area as both can carry ticks into the house that will attach to a person later. Pay special attention to their hair and remove any ticks promptly.

How to Remove a Tick: Step 1

Remove ticks safely. Use fine-tipped tweezers or specially-made notched tick extractors. Protect hands with paper towels or latex gloves. Do not remove ticks with bare hands.

How to Remove a Tick: Step 2

To remove the tick, grasp it as close to the skin’s surface as possible and pull upward with steady, even pressure. Do not twist the tick as this may cause the mouth parts to break off and remain in the skin. If this happens remove the remaining parts with tweezers. Contact your doctor if you are unable to remove remaining parts, or if illness occurs.

How to Remove a Tick: Step 3

Once the tick is removed, disinfect the bite with rubbing alcohol and wash hands thoroughly with soap and water.

How to Remove a Tick: Step 4

Never squeeze or crush the body of the tick because the fluids may contain the infectious bacterium. If the tick is accidentally crushed or punctured and tick fluids get on the skin, disinfect with rubbing alcohol or iodine.

How to Remove a Tick: Step 5

It may not be appealing, but it is a good idea to save the tick for identification in case you become ill later. Identification of the tick can help the doctor make a diagnosis. To save the tick, place it in a sealable container or plastic bag and put it in your freezer. Write the date of the bite on the bag.

Do Folklore Remedies Work?

Folklore remedies such as petroleum jelly or hot matches to try to get the tick to detach do not work and should not be used. They may even make things worse by stimulating the tick to release more saliva or regurgitate gut contents and increase the chances of transmitting disease.

How Can Ticks Be Controlled?

Limiting exposure to ticks remains the most effective way to prevent tickborne disease. However, application of acaricides (chemicals that kill ticks and mites) and control of tick habitats (for example, leaf litter and brush) have been effective in small-scale trials. Other methods being developed include applying acaricides to animal hosts by using baited tubes, boxes, and feeding stations in tick-infested areas. Fungi, parasitic nematodes, and parasitic wasps may also help with tick-control efforts. Community-based tick management strategies may be an effective public-health response to reduce the incidence of tick-borne infections.

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

  1. CDC / Dr. Christopher Paddock, James Gathany
  2. iStockPhoto / CDC — Tick Management Handbook
  3. Color Atlas of Pediatric Dermatology Samuel Weinberg, Neil S. Prose, Leonard Kristal Copyright 2008, 1998, 1990, 1975, by the McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
  4. CDC
  5. iStockPhoto
  6. Image included with permission and copyrighted by First DataBank, Inc.
  7. Fitzpatrick’s Color Atlas & Synopsis of Clinical Dermatology Klaus Wolff, Richard Allen Johnson, Dick Suurmond Copyright 2005, 2001, 1997, 1993 by The McGraw-Hill Companies. All Rights reserved.
  8. iStockPhoto
  9. BigStock
  10. Don Dufur — WebMD
  11. iStockPhoto / CDC — Tick Management Handbook
  12. Don Dufur — WebMD
  13. BigStock
  14. iStockPhoto
  15. iStockPhoto
  16. iStockPhoto
  17. iStockPhoto
  18. iStockPhoto
  19. iStockPhoto
  20. iStockPhoto

www.onhealth.com

Lyme Disease Treatment in Aldie, VA

Lyme disease is an infection caused by a blacklegged tick. This tiny tick causes huge health issues if you are bitten and you do not treat this right away. This article will explore who is a risk for Lyme disease, how to identify a tick bite, the prevention of tick bites, the symptoms of Lyme disease, the medical treatment protocol for Lyme disease, and the recovery from Lyme disease.

Who Is at Risk for Lyme Disease?

If you live in a wooded area, or spend a lot of time outdoors, especially in the states of the coastal northeast, Mid-Atlantic states, Wisconsin, Minnesota, northern California, Asia, Europe or South America, you can be exposed to the blacklegged ticks that carry Lyme disease. If your home is built in a formerly rural area that displaces large deer populations, you are also at risk for Lyme disease. Animals that can carry Lyme disease include:

  • White-footed field mice
  • Deer
  • Raccoons
  • Opossums
  • Skunks
  • Weasels
  • Foxes
  • Shrews
  • Moles
  • Chipmunks
  • Gophers
  • Squirrels
  • Horses

What Does a Lyme Disease Tick Bite Look Like?

In 70 to 80% of Lyme disease cases, there is an appearance of “erythema migrans,” or a very pronounced tell-tale rash; typically, your skin will look like a red bull’s eye, or target-shaped rash. There will often be a pustule center to this bull’s eye. Please see the photo in this article to familiarize yourself with its appearance. Please note that other bites—such as spider bites—can appear like this, so if your rash has this appearance, please see your healthcare provider and get tested right away.

What Are Lyme Disease Symptoms?

Depending on how early or late in its spread that you catch the disease, you can experience the following symptoms:

  • A large, red, target-shaped expanding rash surrounding the site of the tick bite
  • A stiff neck
  • Flu-like symptoms such as chills, fever, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches and joint pain
  • Nerve problems
  • Arthritis (especially in the knees)
  • Temporary paralysis of facial muscles (Bell’s palsy)
  • Numbness, pain or weakness in the limbs
  • Memory loss
  • Difficulty focusing or concentrating
  • Irregular or slow heartbeat
  • Dizziness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Eye inflammation

How is Lyme Disease Identified?

If you don’t have the target-shaped red rash (which happens in 25% of cases), but you’re experiencing symptoms, what’s next? Three to four weeks after your symptoms appear, the doctor will order a blood test to see if you have antibodies against the bacteria. There are two types of blood tests, the ELISA, and the Western Blot. The Western Blot is ordered when the ELISA blood test is inconclusive.

If you are experiencing nervous system symptoms, the next step in diagnosing you is performing a spinal tap, where spinal fluid is removed from your spinal canal to detect brain and spinal cord inflammation, and search for Lyme disease bacterium in your spinal fluid.

How is Lyme Disease Treated?

The more quickly Lyme disease is addressed, the better the outcome. The typical treatment protocol calls for two to four weeks of doxycycline or amoxicillin tablets, taken orally. Beyond two weeks, this treatment is not more effective. Children age 9 or younger and pregnant or lactating women are treated with amoxicillin or penicillin because doxycycline can stain permanent and developing teeth in children. If you are allergic to penicillin, you will be given erythromycin or related antibiotics. Those with heart symptoms are often treated with Rocephin, Claforan, or an intravenous penicillin for two weeks. Most patients will not see long-term heart damage.

How Do I Prevent Tick Bites?

Aside from wearing tick repellant, you can minimize the likelihood of ticks on your property by adhering to the following suggestions:

  • Keep your lawn mowed and well-manicured
  • Prune your trees, clear excess brush and leaf litter
  • Keep your children’s play sets away from the woodland edge of your yard
  • Landscape with gravel pathways, mulch, decking, stone, tile and other hardscapes around your home
  • Wildflower meadows and herbal gardens also detract ticks and are a grass alternative
  • Fence your yard to discourage deer from entering
  • Plant deer-resistant plants such as marigolds, shrubs and trees, annuals and perennials
  • Clean up stonewalls and hiding places that provide shelter for mice and chipmunks
  • Keep your firewood piles far away from your home
  • Apply pesticides or insecticides that kill ticks, preferably in mid-May through early June.

You can request more information about Lyme disease today by calling (703) 215-2795 or contact Dr. Andrew Heyman online.

www.internal-medicine-centers.com

Lyme Disease Treatment in Atlanta, GA

Lyme disease is an infection caused by a blacklegged tick. This tiny tick causes huge health issues if you are bitten and you do not treat this right away. This article will explore who is a risk for Lyme disease, how to identify a tick bite, the prevention of tick bites, the symptoms of Lyme disease, the medical treatment protocol for Lyme disease, and the recovery from Lyme disease.

Who Is at Risk for Lyme Disease?

If you live in a wooded area, or spend a lot of time outdoors, especially in the states of the coastal northeast, Mid-Atlantic states, Wisconsin, Minnesota, northern California, Asia, Europe or South America, you can be exposed to the blacklegged ticks that carry Lyme disease. If your home is built in a formerly rural area that displaces large deer populations, you are also at risk for Lyme disease. Animals that can carry Lyme disease include:

  • White-footed field mice
  • Deer
  • Raccoons
  • Opossums
  • Skunks
  • Weasels
  • Foxes
  • Shrews
  • Moles
  • Chipmunks
  • Gophers
  • Squirrels
  • Horses

What Does a Lyme Disease Tick Bite Look Like?

In 70 to 80% of Lyme disease cases, there is an appearance of “erythema migrans,” or a very pronounced tell-tale rash; typically, your skin will look like a red bull’s eye, or target-shaped rash. There will often be a pustule center to this bull’s eye. Please see the photo in this article to familiarize yourself with its appearance. Please note that other bites—such as spider bites—can appear like this, so if your rash has this appearance, please see your healthcare provider and get tested right away.

What Are Lyme Disease Symptoms?

Depending on how early or late in its spread that you catch the disease, you can experience the following symptoms:

  • A large, red, target-shaped expanding rash surrounding the site of the tick bite
  • A stiff neck
  • Flu-like symptoms such as chills, fever, headaches, fatigue, muscle aches and joint pain
  • Nerve problems
  • Arthritis (especially in the knees)
  • Temporary paralysis of facial muscles (Bell’s palsy)
  • Numbness, pain or weakness in the limbs
  • Memory loss
  • Difficulty focusing or concentrating
  • Irregular or slow heartbeat
  • Dizziness
  • Shortness of breath
  • Eye inflammation

How is Lyme Disease Identified?

If you don’t have the target-shaped red rash (which happens in 25% of cases), but you’re experiencing symptoms, what’s next? Three to four weeks after your symptoms appear, the doctor will order a blood test to see if you have antibodies against the bacteria. There are two types of blood tests, the ELISA, and the Western Blot. The Western Blot is ordered when the ELISA blood test is inconclusive.

If you are experiencing nervous system symptoms, the next step in diagnosing you is performing a spinal tap, where spinal fluid is removed from your spinal canal to detect brain and spinal cord inflammation, and search for Lyme disease bacterium in your spinal fluid.

How is Lyme Disease Treated?

The more quickly Lyme disease is addressed, the better the outcome. The typical treatment protocol calls for two to four weeks of doxycycline or amoxicillin tablets, taken orally. Beyond two weeks, this treatment is not more effective. Children age 9 or younger and pregnant or lactating women are treated with amoxicillin or penicillin because doxycycline can stain permanent and developing teeth in children. If you are allergic to penicillin, you will be given erythromycin or related antibiotics. Those with heart symptoms are often treated with Rocephin, Claforan, or an intravenous penicillin for two weeks. Most patients will not see long-term heart damage.

How Do I Prevent Tick Bites?

Aside from wearing tick repellant, you can minimize the likelihood of ticks on your property by adhering to the following suggestions:

  • Keep your lawn mowed and well-manicured
  • Prune your trees, clear excess brush and leaf litter
  • Keep your children’s play sets away from the woodland edge of your yard
  • Landscape with gravel pathways, mulch, decking, stone, tile and other hardscapes around your home
  • Wildflower meadows and herbal gardens also detract ticks and are a grass alternative
  • Fence your yard to discourage deer from entering
  • Plant deer-resistant plants such as marigolds, shrubs and trees, annuals and perennials
  • Clean up stonewalls and hiding places that provide shelter for mice and chipmunks
  • Keep your firewood piles far away from your home
  • Apply pesticides or insecticides that kill ticks, preferably in mid-May through early June.

You can request more information about Lyme disease today by calling (678) 331-5104 or contact Dr. Gail Ravello online.

www.internal-medicine-centers.com

Lyme Disease Medical Photos

The Lyme Disease Association (LDA) offers this page to provide the general public and professionals with an array of tick images, rash images, and disease organisms to help in the determination of what is Lyme disease and what are other tick-borne diseases.

Many professionals have provided pictures to the Lyme Disease Association that show what some of the rash signs look like, tick images of various ticks that transmit a number of tick-borne diseases in the US, and infectious organisms seen under the microscope that are transmitted by ticks in the US.

This category of medical photos includes pictures of Lyme disease related rashes, ticks and organisms under the microscope.

There are 3 photo albums below: Lyme disease rashes, ticks and under the scope (microscope). To view each album click on pictures below.

The images are intended for education purposes only, and a medical professional should be consulted to determine if someone has a tick-borne disease. The LDA does maintain an online referral where someone can search for a Lyme disease doctor. (LDA Dr. Referral)

Rashes include Lyme, bartonella and other tick-borne diseases (TBD)

Latin Name (Common Name): Diseases they can transmit

Ixodes scapularis (deer tick or black legged tick): Lyme, babesiosis, anaplasmosis, Powassan encephalitis, tick paralysis, tularemia, Bartonella

Amblyomma americanum (lone star tick): Human monocytic ehrlichiosis, STARI, tularemia, tick paralysis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF)

Dermacentor variabilis (American dog tick): RMSF, tularemia, human monocytic ehrlichiosis

Dermacentor andersoni (wood tick): RMSF, tularemia, Colorado tick fever, tick paralysis, Q fever

Ixodes pacificus (western black legged tick): Lyme, babesiosis, anaplasmosis, bartonella

Dermacentor occidentalis (Pacific Coast tick): Pacific Coast tick fever (PCTF) — Rickettsia philipii

lymediseaseassociation.org

Clonazepam Images

What does Clonazepam look like?

Note: Multiple pictures are displayed for those medicines available in different strengths, marketed under different brand names and for medicines manufactured by different pharmaceutical companies. Multi ingredient medications may also be listed when applicable. Return to Pill Identifier…

Results for «Clonazepam» (110 of 55)

93 833

  • Drug:Clonazepam
  • Strength: 1 mg
  • Pill Imprint:93 833
  • Color: Green
  • Shape: Round

G CN 0.5

  • Drug:Clonazepam
  • Strength: 0.5 mg
  • Pill Imprint:G CN 0.5
  • Color: White
  • Shape: Round

  • Drug:Clonazepam (dispersible)
  • Strength: 0.5 mg
  • Pill Imprint:K7
  • Color: White
  • Shape: Round

93 832

  • Drug:Clonazepam
  • Strength: 0.5 mg
  • Pill Imprint:93 832
  • Color: Yellow
  • Shape: Round

93 834

  • Drug:Clonazepam
  • Strength: 2 mg
  • Pill Imprint:93 834
  • Color: White
  • Shape: Round

M C 13

  • Drug:Clonazepam
  • Strength: 0.5 mg
  • Pill Imprint:M C 13
  • Color: Yellow
  • Shape: Round

M C14

  • Drug:Clonazepam
  • Strength: 1 mg
  • Pill Imprint:M C14
  • Color: Green
  • Shape: Round

C 15 M

  • Drug:Clonazepam
  • Strength: 2 mg
  • Pill Imprint:C 15 M
  • Color: White
  • Shape: Round

1/2 b96

  • Drug:Clonazepam
  • Strength: 0.5 mg
  • Pill Imprint:1/2 b96
  • Color: White
  • Shape: Round

b 97 1

  • Drug:Clonazepam
  • Strength: 1 mg
  • Pill Imprint:b 97 1
  • Color: White
  • Shape: Round

Further information

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Trodelvy (sacituzumab govitecan-hziy) is a Trop-2-directed antibody and.

Tukysa (tucatinib) is a kinase inhibitor indicated in combination with.

Pemazyre (pemigatinib) is a selective fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR).

Emerphed (ephedrine sulfate) is a ready-to-use formulation of the approved.

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