UC IPM: UC Management Guidelines for Palestriped Flea Beetle on Carrot

How to Manage Pests

UC Pest Management Guidelines

Carrot

Palestriped Flea Beetle

Scientific Name: Systena blanda

(Reviewed 1/09 , updated 1/09, pesticides updated 4/16 )

In this Guideline:

DESCRIPTION OF THE PEST

Flea beetle adults are small (about 0.12 inch long), shiny beetles with enlarged hind legs that allow them to jump like fleas. The palestriped flea beetle has a broad white stripe down each brown wing.

DAMAGE

Adult flea beetles do most of the damage by feeding on the undersides of leaves, leaving small pits or irregularly shaped holes on the leaves. Large populations can kill or stunt seedlings. Older plants rarely suffer economic damage although their older leaves may be damaged. In the Imperial Valley, larvae feeding on roots have caused serious damage on occasion. This damage is easily confused with cavity spot symptoms.

MANAGEMENT

Cultural Control

Remove weeds along field margins and deeply disk plant residue in infested fields after harvest.

Organically Acceptable Methods

Cultural controls are acceptable for use on organically grown produce.

Monitoring and Treatment Decisions

Check newly emerged seedlings twice weekly for flea beetle damage until plants are well established. Relatively low populations can cause economic damage when plants are in the cotyledon or first-leaf stages. Treat if you find several damaged rows; spot treatment of outside rows or borders may be sufficient. Baits are not effective.

Once plants have several true leaves, they can tolerate several beetles per plant without damage. Older plants are even more tolerant. Insecticide treatment should rarely be required, but if it is, one application should suffice. However, chemical treatment may disrupt biological control of aphids and whiteflies.

Common name Amount per acre** REI‡ PHI‡
(Example trade name) (hours) (days)
UPDATED: 4/16
The following are ranked with the pesticides having the greatest IPM value listed first—the most effective and least harmful to natural enemies, honey bees, and the environment are at the top of the table. When choosing a pesticide, consider information relating to air and water quality, resistance management, and the pesticide’s properties and application timing. Not all registered pesticides are listed. Always read the label of the product being used.
A. ESFENVALERATE*
(Asana XL) 5.8–9.6 fl oz 12 7
MODE-OF-ACTION GROUP NUMBER 1 : 3A
COMMENTS: Lower rate should suffice. Do not exceed 0.5 lb a.i./acre per season. Highly toxic to bees: do not spray directly or allow to drift onto blooming crops or weeds where bees are foraging.
B. CARBARYL*
(Sevin 4F, XLR Plus) 1–2 pt 12 7
MODE-OF-ACTION GROUP NUMBER 1 : 1A
COMMENTS: Highly toxic to bees; do not spray directly or allow to drift onto blooming crops or weeds where bees are foraging.
C. THIAMETHOXAM
(Platinum 75 SG) 1.7–4.01 fl oz 12 NA
MODE-OF-ACTION GROUP NUMBER 1 : 4A
COMMENTS: Highly toxic to bees; do not spray directly or allow to drift onto blooming crops or weeds where bees are foraging.
D. ZETA-CYPERMETHRIN*
(Mustang) 1.9–4.3 fl oz 12 1
MODE-OF-ACTION GROUP NUMBER 1 : 3A
COMMENTS: Highly toxic to bees; do not spray directly or allow to drift onto blooming crops or weeds where bees are foraging.
E. FLONICAMID
(Beleaf 50SG) 2–2.8 fl oz 12 3
MODE-OF-ACTION GROUP NUMBER 1 : 9C
** See label for dilution rates.
Restricted entry interval (REI) is the number of hours (unless otherwise noted) from treatment until the treated area can be safely entered without protective clothing. Preharvest interval (PHI) is the number of days from treatment to harvest. In some cases the REI exceeds the PHI. The longer of two intervals is the minimum time that must elapse before harvest.
1 Rotate chemicals with a different mode-of-action group number, and do not use products with the same mode-of-action group number more than twice per season to help prevent the development of resistance. For example, the organophosphates have a group number of 1B; chemicals with a 1B group number should be alternated with chemicals that have a group number other than 1B. Mode-of-action group numbers are assigned by IRAC (Insecticide Resistance Action Committee).
* Permit required from county agricultural commissioner for purchase or use.
NA (= Non applicable)

PUBLICATION

UC IPM Pest Management Guidelines: Carrot
UC ANR Publication 3438

Insects

E. T. Natwick, UC Cooperative Extension, Imperial County
D. R. Haviland, UC IPM Program, Kern County
C. G. Summers, Entomology, Kearney Agricultural Center, Parlier

Acknowledgment for contributions to Insects:

Statewide IPM Program, Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California
All contents copyright © 2017 The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.

For noncommercial purposes only, any Web site may link directly to this page. FOR ALL OTHER USES or more information, read Legal Notices. Unfortunately, we cannot provide individual solutions to specific pest problems. See our Home page, or in the U.S., contact your local Cooperative Extension office for assistance.

Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of California

ipm.ucanr.edu

The Carrot, the Egg and the Tea Bag

This promising narrative follows the ventures of a young girl named Sharon who learns of the importance of self-determination and perseverance when faced with difficult challenges in her everyday life. Overwhelmed by her determination to succeed, Sharon seeks guidance from her loving father who teaches her a canny yet unforgettable life lesson.

Follow Sharon on her journey of self-discovery as she learns a very important life lesson from her wise father. Through his ingenious imagination and creative use of food items, Sharon’s father teaches a lesson which is both meaningful and noteworthy. Are you the Carrot, the Egg, or the Tea Bag? The decision is yours.

What was the cause of Sharon’s worry? What lesson did Sharon’s father teach her that day? Will the lesson change the way Sharon approaches her responsibilities? In the end, will Sharon decide to be the Carrot, the Egg, or the Teabag?

This beautifully written book holds the key to teaching your children the importance of self-determination in their daily lives. Equip your child with the tools they need to embrace the obstacles and challenges that life presents them, and to encourage them to keep pushing forward, even when the going gets tough.

Nowadays, children are often faced with difficult decisions and complex challenges. Our job is to prepare them for these types of situations by providing them with the tools they need in times of adversity. This includes equipping them with the mentality and mindset to always think of the positive outcome of every situation. This is important because research often finds that children who display optimism and self determination in times of difficulty are more likely to overcome the challenges presented to them.

The Carrot, the Egg, and the Tea Bag is the perfect motivational book that will help you teach your children the importance of self-determination and positivity when presented with any type of situation.

With its compelling storyline and charming characters, The Carrot, the Egg, and the Tea Bag is the perfect bedtime story for the entire family. The book may also prove to be a useful resource for both teachers and counsellors who wish to teach their students the value of perseverance and self-determination as well as positive thinking. All of which are vital skills that can be used in the real world.

he book is filled with stunning illustrations and a simple yet meaningful message that is easy to digest. One lesson which you will walk away with after reading this book is best expressed in this inspirational by Albert Einstein, “In the middle of difficulty lies opportunity”.

*** This children’s book features Kindle Text Pop-Up for reading text over vivid, full-color images (double tap on the text).

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Community Reviews

It’s the beginning of a new school year, which always includes little butterflies for me as well as my children. New teachers, new classmates, new expectations for a new grade. it is exciting as much as it is stressful. But this year poses a new challenge for one of my daughters. She is beginning the gifted program for language arts at her school.

My other three children were also in the program, so we are familiar with the schedule, expectations, and teacher of the program. But this daughter It’s the beginning of a new school year, which always includes little butterflies for me as well as my children. New teachers, new classmates, new expectations for a new grade. it is exciting as much as it is stressful. But this year poses a new challenge for one of my daughters. She is beginning the gifted program for language arts at her school.

My other three children were also in the program, so we are familiar with the schedule, expectations, and teacher of the program. But this daughter has always felt that she was not as smart as her siblings because she was not accepted in the program. She is an excellent writer and loves to read, but her test anxiety affected the scores she needed to be accepted. We praised her for her successes and encouraged her to try new things, and assured her that she was plenty smart without being in the program.

But now that she has been accepted, a whole new sort of anxiety is plaguing her. She is afraid that the program will be too hard for her, and is afraid of not being able to keep up with the others in her groups since she is new to the program and the others have been in it for a few years.

Enter «The Carrot, the Egg, and the Tea Bag.» The reading level of the book is far below my ten-year-old’s level, but the information conveyed is appropriate. and needed. by all ages. The story is centered around a girl who is feeling stressed when many important events are about to take place around the same time. Her father, a chef, helps her by bringing her into the kitchen and asking her to describe three foods: a carrot, an egg, and a tea bag. He then boils the items, and she examines them again. The carrot has become soft, the egg hard, and the tea bag created tea. He explains that this is how people tend to deal with things that are stressful—they can become «soft» and let their fear rule them, they can become «hard» and push people away, or they can shape the adversity into something new and beneficial. He uses examples of the girl’s friends and of herself to show her what the carrot, egg, and tea bag look like in terms of dealing with challenges. The girl learns to look at challenges as opportunities and is better able to manage her stress.

www.goodreads.com

See also:  How to get rid of fleas in the house, Yahoo Answers
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