Can Foggy IGUs (Insulated Glass Units) Be Repaired?

Can Foggy Thermal Windows Be Repaired?

Insulated double- and triple-pane windows, officially known as IGUs (insulated glass units) offer far better energy-efficiency that single-pane glass. Such windows are also commonly called thermal windows. Whether it is just a simple sealed glass sandwich of two glass panes or a more sophisticated IGU with coatings and inert gas filling the space between panes, these windows can easily double the energy-efficiency of the window.

Understanding IGUs (Thermal Windows)

Nearly all windows today, whether for new construction or replacement, have, at their heart, an insulated glass unit, or IGU. This means two or sometimes three panes of glass that are factory-sealed together to form a single unit; they cannot be separated. Single pane windows are difficult to find and are mainly confined to older homes (pre-1980s) or outbuildings (sheds, etc.) where energy saving does not matter.

A basic IGU in which the space between the sealed panes is filled with air will offer better energy-efficiency than a single-pane window, but thermal energy still is transmitted fairly easily through the air, in which the molecules are easily activated when subjected to heat. Thus, while an IGU filled with air is much better than a single-pane window at forming a thermal break, there are other options that can do a much better job.

The better solution is to fill the space between panes of glass in the IGU with a heavy, inert gas such as argon or krypton. In these dense gases, the molecules move very much slower under the impact of thermal energy, which means windows with IGUs filled with such gas will create a much better barrier against heat loss. For this reason, nearly all insulated thermal windows now use one of the inert gases to fill the space between panes.

What Causes Foggy Glass?

A common problem with IGUs occurs when the seals around the edges of the glass unit begin to fail, allowing the inert gas to escape and outside air to enter the space between the glass panes. As a result, moisture in the infiltrating air can condense when conditions are right (colder outer glass against warm air inside the glass panel), causing the glass to develop the hazy fogginess that most everyone has seen. The fogginess may come and go, depending on weather conditions. In the summer, when outdoor temperatures keep the glass warm, the moisture inside the IGU generally does not condense into visible condensation, but as the weather cools, the moist air touching the cold outer glass causes moisture to condense into visible water droplets. Anytime you see this kind of fogginess that comes and goes in a window, you are dealing with an insulated window that has lost its seals.

The reality is that all IGUs gradually lose the inert gas filling the space between panes, and the seals themselves have a limited life expectancy and will eventually break down. According to Dr. Andreas Wolf of glassmaker Dow Corning, a host of factors such as «temperature and atmospheric pressure fluctuations, wind loads, working loads, sunlight, water, and water vapor that negatively affect their life expectancy.»Another major IGU manufacturer, PPG, estimates that all units naturally lose 1 percent of their gas per year.

In other words, you can eventually expect your IGU windows to lose their effectiveness and for the seals to fail. After 15 or 20 years of service, it should be no surprise when some of your thermal windows develop foggy glass. If it happens within the window’s warranty period, however, your first option should be to contact the window manufacturer to discuss replacement under the conditions of the product warranty.

Solutions for Foggy Glass

Up until recently, fogginess in insulated glass was something you either lived with or dealt with by full-scale replacement of the IGU. This can involve the replacement of the entire sash—the IGU plus the wooden or fiberglass frame around the glass—or removal and replacement of just the IGU panel inside the sash frame. There are entire businesses devoted to fabricating new IGU panels according to specifications and installing them in existing window frames. This is not an inexpensive process, though it is cheaper than having the entire window unit repaired. And new IGU panels come with a warranty against failure for some amount of time after installation.

Replacement of the IGU or IGU-plus-sash is usually cheaper than total window replacement because less labor and fewer parts are required. However, it can be difficult to find a company that will replace your IGUs or sashes only. Window companies make their real money with whole-house or substantial partial-house window replacements, not by switching out the occasional sash. Per-window costs will be best if you have many window sashes to replace, since this is more attractive to contractors.

There is, however, another technique that can be tried. Foggy windows can be repaired using a defogging procedure. Still a fledgling niche industry, window defogging is capable of producing cosmetic results that help improve visibility in your windows. On the downside, defogging does nothing to restore the window’s insulating ability (R-value) to its original level. Defogging is a controversial practice, criticized by some experts but lauded by some homeowners who are happy with the cosmetic improvements.

How Defogging Works

While there are DIY kits available that purport to eliminate fogginess in a thermal window, these are not easy to use and the results are uneven. It is much better to hire a professional firm that specializes in this service. The essence of the procedure is to expel the water vapor inside the window, then quickly seal it up again before more moisture-laden air can infiltrate the IGU.

Professional defogging contractors follow a simple procedure:

  1. The technician drills tiny holes in the glass to expel the moisture from between the glass panes.
  2. An anti-fog solution is applied to the inside of the IGU.
  3. A liquid sealant is added to the bottom of the glass.
  4. A seal is installed in the drilled hole.

Defogging costs about half of what it costs to replace an entire IGU. While it does get rid of the fog and make your window look better, it does not replace the inert gas between the glass panes, nor does in restore the thermal performance of the window.

www.thespruce.com

Bed Bug Treatment Tips: Pg4

Our section on how to get rid of bed bugs has 4 pages of tips and discussions from our visitors:
Pg1, Pg2, Pg3, Pg4, Pg5

Marie’s Treatment Tips

Two years ago, I had a group of foreign exchange students visiting. After they left, I had a young American man here tell me about my bedbugs. I didn’t know what he was talking about. So he showed me. I spent the next ten days doing research on line, The American kid wanted to treat immediately, and picked up cockroach spray. That served to spread them to another bed in the same room. I told him to stop it, what he picked out was shown online to be ineffective in anything but causing them to run and spread. They run so fast.

What I discovered in the local hardware stores (sprays and bombs), and local chemical store (a spray), did not work, even though they were advertised as bedbug killers. They were very expensive, and even with direct contact did not kill all the adults. The local fumigators wanted $700 to $900 to come and put a bag on my home and fumigate. I would have to vacate, taking pillows and food things out of the house for three days. And then I was going to have to do it again in ten days, and again, in ten days. So for $2100-$2700 in fumigation, plus 9 days in a hotel, i was going to have the opportunity to have someone else take care of my problem.

See also:  How to Use Borax to Kill Fleas Safely

The 20 Mule Team Borax I have found useful in treating for fleas over the past thirty years did not make a dent in the bed bugs, I haven’t tried the salt / borax mixture I’ve read on this website.

In doing research i discovered that malathion is one of the pesticides on the market that still works, and it it not available in my county. I found it online from a plant nursery in the north, and had it shipped in to Florida. The first thing i did was the edges of the room, the doors frames, the window frames, and then the a/c vents. I turned off the power to the room (best to turn off all power!) and took off all electrical covers, phone line cover and the cable tv jack cover. I sprayed Malathion into all the openings in the wall. I sprayed along the baseboards. I sprayed the spline edges on the screens.

Then I spread food grade diatomaceous earth all over the floor. I sprayed bleach on the mattresses, and the bugs did not die. I put three adults on a paperplate and sprayed different things on them and 1 out of 3 would die, and the other 2 would get up, wave at me, and attempt to walk away. I crushed them. I then mixed Dawn for Dishes 1/5 soap and 4/5 water. I got an immediate 100% kill rate on the adults.

Having isolated the creatures in the one bedroom, taken out the exits with poison (yes, I hated it, but i wanted a quick, thorough kill, not a gradual die off that would allow the females to drop eggs as they were running to other parts of my home to die. I then caulked every floorboard, window frame, and the frames in the bed and furniture. I caulked and painted the furniture to completely seal the furniture. I put two new layers of paint on the walls and ceiling. I vacuumed daily for six weeks. The war lasted 6 weeks, eighteen hour days. Thank God i am self employed and was able to carve out that time, more than ten percent of that year, to handle the bug problem.

After six weeks, I was bug free. I was so relieved.

Two months later, I had a young college come and stay with me to start school in my community. He only stayed a month because he took to bringing home street people to sleep on an air mattress on the floor of the bedroom. He was feeling virtuous that he was helping the less fortunate. I was not comfortable with his charitable activities, and he left. As I was pulling the sheets from his bed I discovered three adult bed bugs. There were no sheds or obvious eggs, there was no blood load or blood trail. These bed bugs were MUCH larger and more ovular in shape than the bedbugs i did battle with downstairs. I didn’t know there were different types of bed bugs like there are different types of than the cockroaches.

I immediately treated the perimeter of the room with malathion to prevent an escape into the rest of the house (baseboard cracks, window frames, door frames, plus turned off the electric to that room and removed all the electrical covers, cable cover, and phone cover). I replaced the covers, caulked and painted. I sprayed the ceiling fan motor with malathion. I waited a day, again, to turn the power back on to the room, giving everything time to dry. Then I did the entire room as i had done the downstairs. This was a metal framed bed, so i did not caulk and paint it. I stayed out of the room for ten days. The Dawn for Dishes / water mix i had found effective once again killed all the adults with whom it came in contact. After ten days, I returned to the room and checked for bugs. I found another three adults on the edge of the box spring, against the metal frame. I sprayed them with the Dawn for Dishes mix, and they all died immediately. I had no further problem in that room.

It has been two years, and I have been relieved to not deal with bedbugs, again, until 3 days ago. A visiting friend said something about the ticks in his bed. I went to see what was going on, and discovered he had unpacked his entire van, his personal effects had piled up two feet deep around the bed, plus the underside of the bed was stuffed full, plus there were clothing hanging on the curtain rods. The first things i noticed were the discolorations on the creases at the top of the insulated curtains. I didn’t remember my curtains having those dark stains. My friend had been with me six weeks, and I hadn’t been in his room. I had a hard time crawling over his things to get the the mattress and look closely. The first thing I saw on the bed were the speckles of dried blood on the pillow. Not good.

I pulled back the covers and immediately saw two run. I raced back to the kitchen to fill a spray bottle with Dawn for Dishes. I have a fifty pound sack of DE i picked up from a feed store to worm the animals and myself, and to take down the flea and tick problem in the yard. It takes about six weeks to take the flea and tick infestation down to zero. Since the room is already caulked and painted from the bug war two years ago, I put the DE down along the perimeter of the room, under the mattress and box spring, and began pulling all the linens and drapes for washing and drying with Dawn for Dishes and 20 Mule Team Borax. I sprayed the ceiling fans, outlets for the electric, cable and phones with malathion.

Three days ago we had one bed with a huge infestation. Today, I discovered six living adults walking around by day. One was attempting to run through the DE and couldn’t make it to the edge of the thick layer of DE on the floor. That is the first time i have seen them moving around by day. I have another twenty loads of clothing, bedding, curtains, pillows, and towels to wash and dry. We are moving the clean clothing into a safe room, and leaving them there until we make sure we have gotten rid of these bugs, again, in the guest room. They have been there between three and six weeks by the size of the large ones. I assume a visitor brought them in and left them for the next visitor coming into the bedroom.

Now that i know what works for me, and have that room caulked and painted, the bugs didn’t find furniture cracks and crevices to hide and lay their eggs. Instead, they have congregated in the clothing, the suitcase clutter surrounding the bed, and in the clothing hanging from the curtain rods. I will leave the DE down until tomorrow, and will vacuum it up four days after first putting it down for this infestation. It is 4am, I have gone into that room looking for live bugs every hour. There are no live bugs in that room at this time. This is good. This is the quickest i have been able to bring these creatures to a stop. They are so smart and resilient.

See also:  Katsaridaphobia (Phobia of Cockroaches): Symptoms, Causes, and Treatments

I’ve read that the way to to treat luggage is to put it into a car in the sun for an afternoon. Perfect, I’m in Florida. When I want to dry plant specimens quickly, I press them and put them in the car in the sun. Quick dry. Tomorrow I will take the DE covered luggage and have my houseguest put them back into his car in the sun. Teaching him what to do and not to do has been difficult. He was so horrified by the bugs that he started throwing his things from the floor onto another bed. NOOOOO! He wanted to throw all the furniture away, NOOOOO!. Drag an infested piece of furniture through the house means it can drop eggs as it goes and causes the risk of infestation of the rest of the house.

I am not as flipped out as the first time I saw them, but i am in the itching scratching response of just seeing them without sleeping among them or getting bit. I have stopped having visitors into the house, and opted not to spend the night at a friend’s home.

During the first infestation, I was traveling for school, and opted to sleep in my car in rest stops rather than in hotels or at friend’s homes because i did not want to risk passing the infestation on. I didn’t know then what i have read on line tonight about the car heat killing the bugs.

I have spoken with cleaning people from the local expensive hotels, and they say that they have rooms that are infested in the bed area, and in the pull out bed area of the living room. They have to spray repeatedly, and they keep coming back.

They told me to NEVER put my luggage on the carpet on a hotel, to put the luggage in a hard surface in the bath area where bed bugs are not likely to travel, on top of a dresser, and to use the luggage stand available in the closet.

I never thought to look at the luggage stand for blood load, but after reading more tonight, i will look closer.

Good luck to all of you in battle with the bugs. You can win this war!

If you find a treatment that works for you, please, take a moment and leave a comment so that others may benefit from your experience.

We have a ton of success stories, so many in fact, we had to break the discussions into pages:

Our section on how to get rid of bed bugs has 4 pages of tips and discussions from our visitors:
Pg1, Pg2, Pg3, Pg4, Pg5

Disclaimer: These Bed Bug Treatments are suggestions from people visiting our site and kind enough to leave a comment helping others. I have no idea if they work or not and no idea how safe, if safe at all, any of these treatments are. You should consult a doctor before acting on any of these comments. I’ve listed them so that you can further research them, not act upon them. ALWAYS consult a doctor before acting on any of this information. We are not medical professionals.

www.badbedbugs.com

Cryosurgery in Cancer Treatment

What is cryosurgery?

Cryosurgery (also called cryotherapy) is the use of extreme cold produced by liquid nitrogen (or argon gas) to destroy abnormal tissue. Cryosurgery is used to treat external tumors, such as those on the skin. For external tumors, liquid nitrogen is applied directly to the cancer cells with a cotton swab or spraying device.

Cryosurgery is also used to treat tumors inside the body (internal tumors and tumors in the bone). For internal tumors, liquid nitrogen or argon gas is circulated through a hollow instrument called a cryoprobe, which is placed in contact with the tumor. The doctor uses ultrasound or MRI to guide the cryoprobe and monitor the freezing of the cells, thus limiting damage to nearby healthy tissue. (In ultrasound, sound waves are bounced off organs and other tissues to create a picture called a sonogram.) A ball of ice crystals forms around the probe, freezing nearby cells. Sometimes more than one probe is used to deliver the liquid nitrogen to various parts of the tumor. The probes may be put into the tumor during surgery or through the skin (percutaneously). After cryosurgery, the frozen tissue thaws and is either naturally absorbed by the body (for internal tumors), or it dissolves and forms a scab (for external tumors).

What types of cancer can be treated with cryosurgery?

Cryosurgery is used to treat several types of cancer, and some precancerous or noncancerous conditions. In addition to prostate and liver tumors, cryosurgery can be an effective treatment for the following:

  • Retinoblastoma (a childhood cancer that affects the retina of the eye). Doctors have found that cryosurgery is most effective when the tumor is small and only in certain parts of the retina.
  • Early-stage skin cancers (both basal cell and squamous cell carcinomas).
  • Precancerous skin growths known as actinic keratosis.
  • Precancerous conditions of the cervix known as cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (abnormal cell changes in the cervix that can develop into cervical cancer).

Cryosurgery is also used to treat some types of low-grade cancerous and noncancerous tumors of the bone. It may reduce the risk of joint damage when compared with more extensive surgery, and help lessen the need for amputation. The treatment is also used to treat AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma when the skin lesions are small and localized.

Researchers are evaluating cryosurgery as a treatment for a number of cancers, including breast, colon and kidney cancer. They are also exploring cryotherapy in combination with other cancer treatments, such as hormone therapy, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery.

In what situations can cryosurgery be used to treat prostate cancer? What are the side effects?

Cryosurgery can be used to treat men who have early-stage prostate cancer that is confined to the prostate gland. It is less well established than standard prostatectomy and various types of radiation therapy. Long-term outcomes are not known. Because it is effective only in small areas, cryosurgery is not used to treat prostate cancer that has spread outside the gland, or to distant parts of the body.

Some advantages of cryosurgery are that the procedure can be repeated, and it can be used to treat men who cannot have surgery or radiation therapy because of their age or other medical problems.

Cryosurgery for the prostate gland can cause side effects. These side effects may occur more often in men who have had radiation to the prostate.

  • Cryosurgery may obstruct urine flow or cause incontinence (lack of control over urine flow); often, these side effects are temporary.
  • Many men become impotent (loss of sexual function).
  • In some cases, the surgery has caused injury to the rectum.

In what situations can cryosurgery be used to treat primary liver cancer or liver metastases (cancer that has spread to the liver from another part of the body)? What are the side effects?

Cryosurgery may be used to treat primary liver cancer that has not spread. It is used especially if surgery is not possible due to factors such as other medical conditions. The treatment also may be used for cancer that has spread to the liver from another site (such as the colon or rectum). In some cases, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy may be given before or after cryosurgery. Cryosurgery in the liver may cause damage to the bile ducts and/or major blood vessels, which can lead to hemorrhage (heavy bleeding) or infection.

See also:  Should I leave my home or apartment if I have Bed Bugs? Bed Bug Law

Does cryosurgery have any complications or side effects?

Cryosurgery does have side effects, although they may be less severe than those associated with surgery or radiation therapy. The effects depend on the location of the tumor. Cryosurgery for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia has not been shown to affect a woman’s fertility, but it can cause cramping, pain, or bleeding. When used to treat skin cancer (including Kaposi sarcoma), cryosurgery may cause scarring and swelling; if nerves are damaged, loss of sensation may occur, and, rarely, it may cause a loss of pigmentation and loss of hair in the treated area. When used to treat tumors of the bone, cryosurgery may lead to the destruction of nearby bone tissue and result in fractures, but these effects may not be seen for some time after the initial treatment and can often be delayed with other treatments. In rare cases, cryosurgery may interact badly with certain types of chemotherapy. Although the side effects of cryosurgery may be less severe than those associated with conventional surgery or radiation, more studies are needed to determine the long-term effects.

What are the advantages of cryosurgery?

Cryosurgery offers advantages over other methods of cancer treatment. It is less invasive than surgery, involving only a small incision or insertion of the cryoprobe through the skin. Consequently, pain, bleeding, and other complications of surgery are minimized. Cryosurgery is less expensive than other treatments and requires shorter recovery time and a shorter hospital stay, or no hospital stay at all. Sometimes cryosurgery can be done using only local anesthesia.

Because physicians can focus cryosurgical treatment on a limited area, they can avoid the destruction of nearby healthy tissue. The treatment can be safely repeated and may be used along with standard treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and radiation. Cryosurgery may offer an option for treating cancers that are considered inoperable or that do not respond to standard treatments. Furthermore, it can be used for patients who are not good candidates for conventional surgery because of their age or other medical conditions.

What are the disadvantages of cryosurgery?

The major disadvantage of cryosurgery is the uncertainty surrounding its long-term effectiveness. While cryosurgery may be effective in treating tumors the physician can see by using imaging tests (tests that produce pictures of areas inside the body), it can miss microscopic cancer spread. Furthermore, because the effectiveness of the technique is still being assessed, insurance coverage issues may arise.

What does the future hold for cryosurgery?

Additional studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of cryosurgery in controlling cancer and improving survival. Data from these studies will allow physicians to compare cryosurgery with standard treatment options such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Moreover, physicians continue to examine the possibility of using cryosurgery in combination with other treatments.

Where is cryosurgery currently available?

Cryosurgery is widely available in gynecologists’ offices for the treatment of cervical neoplasias. A limited number of hospitals and cancer centers throughout the country currently have skilled doctors and the necessary technology to perform cryosurgery for other noncancerous, precancerous, and cancerous conditions. Individuals can consult with their doctors or contact hospitals and cancer centers in their area to find out where cryosurgery is being used.

Related Resources
  • Reviewed: September 10, 2003

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www.cancer.gov

MSU Extension

There are steps to take after a pest management professional has treated your home for bed bugs.

When working with a pest management professional (PMP) to eradicate bed bugs, it is important to cooperate and follow all steps that are specified by the PMP. According to research, individuals who work cooperatively with their PMP’s can make the eradication process much shorter. The Michigan State University Extension article, Preparing Your Home for Bed Bug Treatment, outlines the steps that should be taken.

If the PMP’s treatment included pesticides, they will tell you how long to wait before re-entering the home. Once inside, air the rooms for an hour. Linens and clothing that were left in the treated rooms should be washed and dried. Wash in hot water and dry on the hot setting for at least 30 minutes. The PMP will tell you when the room can be vacuumed.

Bed bug management is a time consuming and difficult task. After physical repairs, cleaning and treatment have been conducted it is important to monitor for surviving bed bugs. If the PMP used conventional treatment, there may be some surviving eggs that will hatch. This doesn’t mean that the treatment was ineffective. As these eggs hatch it will be necessary to continue monitoring and to have follow-up treatments. A conventional chemical treatment program will usually require at least one follow-up treatment two weeks later.

You may continue to sleep in your bed after treatment. Encasements should be put on mattresses and box springs. Any surviving bed bugs in the mattress or box spring will not be able to escape the encasement or bite. Encasements also prevent bed bugs living in other parts of the room from establishing themselves in the mattress or box spring.

After treatment the PMP will inspect to determine whether the treatment has been effective. If a significant reduction in bed bugs is not observed, it may be necessary to consider a combination of methods or an alternative to the treatment that had been used. You will have to follow any steps outlined by the PMP prior to the follow-up service to prepare the room(s) or home. Monitors such as sticky traps or bed bug interceptors may be helpful in the weeks following treatment.

There are several reasons why a treatment may not be effective:

  • All sources of the bed bugs were not identified during the inspection phase.
  • All sources of bed bugs were not treated.
  • Ineffective insecticides were used or there was insufficient contact time if heat was used.
  • Re-introduction of infested items. If any of your belongings were removed prior to treatment and then brought back afterward, bed bugs could be re-introduced. In order to avoid this, do not move items out of the home or area to be treated without first consulting with your PMP.

For information on how to prevent or treat bed bug infestations, visit the Michigan Department of Community Health website, www.michigan.gov/bedbugs.

This article was published by Michigan State University Extension. For more information, visit https://extension.msu.edu. To have a digest of information delivered straight to your email inbox, visit https://extension.msu.edu/newsletters. To contact an expert in your area, visit https://extension.msu.edu/experts, or call 888-MSUE4MI (888-678-3464).

Did you find this article useful?

www.canr.msu.edu

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