How the Beetle Got Her Colors-Fable Play Script for Schools

How the Beetle Got Her Colors-Play Script

How the Beetle Got Her Colors focuses on popular folktales from Latin America. Storyteller Ricardo teaches his niece Armida, nephew Miguel, and the audience songs and tales that emphasize the importance of being kind to one another while learning new words in Spanish. In the tale from Mexico called Rabbit’s Last Race children learn a lesson about humility. Ricardo then teaches everyone a Mardi Gras song from Bolivia called The Morenada. In a tale from Brazil, a parrot has the power to change the colors of any creature in the forest and demonstrates the importance of getting to know one another before passing judgment. This wonderful interactive play will leave everyone feeling muy bueno!

Carlos Perez has a M.A. in English from the University of Missouri—Kansas City (a professional writing degree in playwriting and screenwriting) and a B.F.A. in Speech and Theatre from Avila University. His recognized stage plays include Caught Between Two Worlds, published by Dramatic Publishing and Folktales for Fun, published by Pioneer Drama Service, Inc. Carlos’ latest stage play In Hyding, an adaptation of the novel Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, recently received a staged reading at the Monster Box Theater in Waterford, Michigan. His one act stage play Two Good Reasons placed second the 2016 William Faulkner Literary Awards, giving him two years in a row of success for that competition, with his original play Cleansing Acts placing in the 2015 William Faulkner Literary Competition. A full production of Cleansing Acts premiered at the 2013 LaBute New Theatre Festival in St. Louis, Missouri by the St. Louis Actors’ Studio, and was named winner of the Riverfront Times newspaper’s Best of 2013 Stage Plays.

Excerpt from the play:

CAST OF CHARACTERS

Ricardo
Miguel
Armida
Frog/Rana
Rabbit/Canejo
Butterfly/Mariposa
Gray Beetle/Besouro Cinza
Rat/Rato
Beautiful Beetle/Besouro Lindo
Parrot/Papagaio
Two Banner Bearers
Two Map Carriers
Five Frog Placard Carriers

The play opens with all characters beginning the song ‘Brother John’ backstage and continuing to sing as they enter. They stop singing when Miguel sees the audience.

All Actors
Are you sleeping, are you sleeping,
Brother John? Brother John?
Morning bells are ringing,
Morning bells are ringing,
Ding, Dang, Dong
Ding, Dang, Dong

Miguel
(Seeing the audience) Oh, hi!

The actors stop singing.

Armida
Look Uncle Ricardo, they’re already here.

Ricardo
Buenos dias! Good morning! (Buenas tardes for good afternoon or Buenas noches for good evening.) It’s good to see you. My name’s Ricardo and this is my niece Armida and her brother Miguel. (points to other performers) And these are our friends.

All Actors
(to audience) Hello! Hola!

Ricardo sets a basket to the side of the stage.

Ricardo
(to audience) I’m here to tell you some stories from countries south of the border of the United States of America, and everyone here has offered to help me.

Armida
I have an idea Uncle Ricardo, why don’t we start to get to know each other by singing a song
together.

Ricardo
That’s a good idea, Armida. But what song should we sing?

Miguel
Why don’t we sing Brother John? That was the song we were singing when we got here.

Ricardo
Excellent idea, Miguel. (to audience) Do you know the song, Brother John? (audience response)
Well, how about we start it for you so we can all learn it?

All Actors
Are you sleeping, are you sleeping,
Brother John? Brother John?
Morning bells are ringing,
Morning bells are ringing,
Ding, Dang, Dong
Ding, Dang, Dong

Ricardo
(to audience) Now let’s sing it together. (to rest of cast) Ready?

All Actors
Ready!

Ricardo
(to audience) Ready? (audience response) Then let’s begin.

All Actors
(with audience)
Are you sleeping, are you sleeping,
Brother John? Brother John?
Morning bells are ringing,
Morning bells are ringing,
Ding, Dang, Dong
Ding, Dang, Dong

Ricardo
(to audience) Very good. Muy Bueno. Now we’re going to sing it in Spanish because our first folktale is from Mexico and Spanish is the main language spoken there. Don’t worry if you don’t know Spanish, we will help you. May I have the translation please?

Two of the actors hold up a banner for the audience to see. On the banner are the lyrics to the song written in Spanish. Seeing the banner, Ricardo looks at the banner then back to the audience.

Ricardo
Okay, since it’s in Spanish, let me read it to you slowly so you will understand it better. Then I’ll
sing it once. Then we’ll sing it all together. Okay? Okay, here I go.

Ricardo (cont.)
(spoken)
Hermanito Hermanito
Duermes tu’? Duermes tu’?
Suenan las campanas,
Suenan las campanas,
Din, Don, Din
Din, Don, Din

Now I’ll sing it once.

(singing)
Hermanito Hermanito
Duermes tu’? Duermes tu’?
Suenan las campanas,
Suenan las campanas,
Din, Don, Din
Din, Don, Din

(to audience) Okay, now let’s all sing the first two lines together.

The actors on stage will encourage and help the audience to sing with them.

All Actors
Hermanito Hermanito
Duermes tu’? Duermes tu’?

Ricardo
One more time

All Actors
Hermanito Hermanito
Duermes tu’? Duermes tu’?

Ricardo
Very good. Now the next four lines.

All Actors
Suenan las campanas,
Suenan las campanas,
Din, Don, Din
Din, Don, Din

Ricardo
Let’s do those four lines one more time.

All Actors
Suenan las campanas,
Suenan las campanas,
Din, Don, Din
Din, Don, Din

Ricardo
Now let’s all do the whole song.

All Actors
Hermanito Hermanito
Duermes tu’? Duermes tu’?
Suenan las campanas,
Suenan las campanas,
Din, Don, Din
Din, Don, Din

Miguel and Armida
One more time!

www.dramanotebook.com

How the Brazilian Beetles Got Their Gorgeous Coats

Brazilian folktale

In Brazil the beetles have such beautifully coloured, hard-shelled coats upon their backs that they are often set in pins and necklaces like precious stones. Once upon a time, years and years ago, they had ordinary plain brown coats. This is how it happened that the Brazilian beetle earned a new coat.

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One day a little brown beetle was crawling along a wall when a big grey rat ran out of a hole in the wall and looked down scornfully at the little beetle. «O ho!» he said to the beetle, «how slowly you crawl along. You’ll never get anywhere in the world. Just look at me and see how fast I can run.»

The big grey rat ran to the end of the wall, wheeled around, and came back to the place where the little beetle was slowly crawling along at only a tiny distance from where the rat had left her.

«Don’t you wish that you could run like that?» said the big grey rat to the little brown beetle.

«You are surely a fast runner,» replied the little brown beetle politely. Her mother had taught her always to be polite and had often said to her that a really polite beetle never boasts about her own accomplishments. The little brown beetle never boasted a single boast about the things she could do. She just went on slowly crawling along the wall.

A bright green and gold parrot in the mango tree over the wall had heard the conversation. «How would you like to race with the beetle?» he asked the big grey rat. «I live next door to the tailor bird,» he added, «and just to make the race exciting I’ll offer a bright coloured coat as a prize to the one who wins the race. You may choose for it any colour you like and I’ll have it made to order.»

«I’d like a yellow coat with stripes like the tiger’s,» said the big grey rat, looking over his shoulder at his gaunt grey sides as if he were already admiring his new coat.

«I’d like a beautiful, bright coloured new coat, too,» said the little brown beetle.

The big grey rat laughed long and loud until his gaunt grey sides were shaking. «Why, you talk just as if you thought you had a chance to win the race,» he said, when he could speak.

The bright green and gold parrot set the royal palm tree at the top of the cliff as the goal of the race. He gave the signal to start and then he flew away to the royal palm tree to watch for the end of the race.

The big grey rat ran as fast as he could. Then he thought how very tired he was getting. «What’s the use of hurrying?» he said to himself. «The little brown beetle can not possibly win. If I were racing with somebody who could really run it would be very different.» Then he started to run more slowly but every time his heart beat it said, «Hurry up! Hurry up!» The big grey rat decided that it was best to obey the little voice in his heart so he hurried just as fast as he could.

When he reached the royal palm tree at the top of the cliff he could hardly believe his eyes. He thought he must be having a bad dream. There was the little brown beetle sitting quietly beside the bright green and gold parrot. The big grey rat had never been so surprised in all his life. «How did you ever manage to run fast enough to get here so soon?» he asked the little brown beetle as soon as he could catch his breath.

The little brown beetle drew out the tiny wings from her sides. «Nobody said anything about having to run to win the race,» she replied, «so I flew instead.»

«I did not know that you could fly,» said the big grey rat in a subdued little voice.

«After this,» said the bright green and gold parrot, «never judge any one by his looks alone. You never can tell how often or where you may find concealed wings. You have lost the prize.»

Until this day, even in Brazil where the flowers and birds and beasts and insects have such gorgeous colouring, the rat wears a plain dull grey coat.

Then the parrot turned to the little brown beetle who was waiting quietly at his side. «What colour do you want your new coat to be?» he asked.

The little brown beetle looked up at the bright green and gold parrot, at the green and gold palm trees above their heads, at the green mangoes with golden flushes on their cheeks lying on the ground under the mango trees, at the golden sunshine upon the distant green hills. «I choose a coat of green and gold,» she said.

From that day to this the Brazilian beetle has worn a coat of green with golden lights upon it.

For years and years the Brazilian beetles were all very proud to wear green and gold coats like that of the beetle who raced with the rat.

Then, once upon a time, it happened that there was a little beetle who grew discontented with her coat of green and gold. She looked up at the blue sky and out at the blue sea and wished that she had a blue coat instead. She talked about it so much that finally her mother took her to the parrot who lived next to the tailor bird.

«You may change your coat for a blue one,» said the parrot, «but if you change you’ll have to give up something.»

«Oh, I’ll gladly give up anything if only I may have a blue coat instead of a green and gold one,» said the discontented little beetle.

When she received her new coat she thought it was very beautiful. It was a lovely shade of blue and it had silvery white lights upon it like the light of the stars. When she put it on, however, she discovered that it was not hard like the green and gold one. From that day to this the blue beetles’ coats have not been hard and firm. That is the reason why the jewellers have difficulty in using them in pins and necklaces like other beetles.

From the moment that the little beetle put on her new blue coat she never grew again. From that day to this the blue beetles have been much smaller than the green and gold ones.

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When the Brazilians made their flag they took for it a square of green the colour of the green beetle’s coat. Within this square they placed a diamond of gold like the golden lights which play upon the green beetle’s back. Then, within the diamond, they drew a circle to represent the round earth and they coloured it blue like the coat of the blue beetle. Upon the blue circle they placed stars of silvery white like the silvery white lights on the back of the blue beetle. About the blue circle of the earth which they thus pictured they drew a band of white, and upon this band they wrote the motto of their country, «Ordem e Progresso, order and progress.»

Fairy tales from Brazil

Notes: Subtitled «How and why tales from Brazilian folk-lore», this book contains 18 Brazilian folktales.
Author: Elsie Spicer Eells
Published: 1917
Publisher: Dodd, Mead and Company, Inc., Chicago

www.worldoftales.com

How Brazilian Beetles Got their Gorgeous Coats

Brazilian fable about not boasting, ingenuity and the colours of the national flag.

“In Brazil the beetles have such beautifully coloured, hard-shelled coats upon their backs that they are often set in pins and necklaces like precious stones. Once upon a time, years and years ago, they had ordinary plain brown coats. This is how it happened that the Brazilian beetle earned a new coat.

One day a little brown beetle was crawling along a wall when a big grey rat ran out of a hole in the wall and looked down scornfully at the little beetle. “O ho!” he said to the beetle, “how slowly you crawl along. You’ll never get anywhere in the world. Just look at me and see how fast I can run.”

The big grey rat ran to the end of the wall, wheeled around, and came back to the place where the little beetle was slowly crawling along at only a tiny distance from where the rat had left her.

“Don’t you wish that you could run like that?” said the big grey rat to the little brown beetle.

“You are surely a fast runner,” replied the little brown beetle politely. Her mother had taught her always to be polite and had often said to her that a really polite beetle never boasts about her own accomplishments. The little brown beetle never boasted a single boast about the things she could do. She just went on slowly crawling along the wall.

A bright green and gold parrot in the mango tree over the wall had heard the conversation. “How would you like to race with the beetle?” he asked the big grey rat. “I live next door to the tailor bird,” he added, “and just to make the race exciting I’ll offer a bright coloured coat as a prize to the one who wins the race. You may choose for it any colour you like and I’ll have it made to order.”

“I’d like a yellow coat with stripes like the tiger’s,” said the big grey rat, looking over his shoulder at his gaunt grey sides as if he were already admiring his new coat.

“I’d like a beautiful, bright coloured new coat, too,” said the little brown beetle.

The big grey rat laughed long and loud until his gaunt grey sides were shaking. “Why, you talk just as if you thought you had a chance to win the race,” he said, when he could speak.

The bright green and gold parrot set the royal palm tree at the top of the cliff as the goal of the race. He gave the signal to start and then he flew away to the royal palm tree to watch for the end of the race.

The big grey rat ran as fast as he could. Then he thought how very tired he was getting. “What’s the use of hurrying?” he said to himself. “The little brown beetle can not possibly win. If I were racing with somebody who could really run it would be very different.” Then he started to run more slowly but every time his heart beat it said, “Hurry up! Hurry up!” The big grey rat decided that it was best to obey the little voice in his heart so he hurried just as fast as he could.

When he reached the royal palm tree at the top of the cliff he could hardly believe his eyes. He thought he must be having a bad dream. There was the little brown beetle sitting quietly beside the bright green and gold parrot. The big grey rat had never been so surprised in all his life. “How did you ever manage to run fast enough to get here so soon?” he asked the little brown beetle as soon as he could catch his breath.

The little brown beetle drew out the tiny wings from her sides. “Nobody said anything about having to run to win the race,” she replied, “so I flew instead.”

“I did not know that you could fly,” said the big grey rat in a subdued little voice.

“After this,” said the bright green and gold parrot, “never judge any one by his looks alone. You never can tell how often or where you may find concealed wings. You have lost the prize.”

Until this day, even in Brazil where the flowers and birds and beasts and insects have such gorgeous colouring, the rat wears a plain dull grey coat.

Then the parrot turned to the little brown beetle who was waiting quietly at his side. “What colour do you want your new coat to be?” he asked.

The little brown beetle looked up at the bright green and gold parrot, at the green and gold palm trees above their heads, at the green mangoes with golden flushes on their cheeks lying on the ground under the mango trees, at the golden sunshine upon the distant green hills. “I choose a coat of green and gold,” she said.

From that day to this the Brazilian beetle has worn a coat of green with golden lights upon it.

For years and years the Brazilian beetles were all very proud to wear green and gold coats like that of the beetle who raced with the rat.

Then, once upon a time, it happened that there was a little beetle who grew discontented with her coat of green and gold. She looked up at the blue sky and out at the blue sea and wished that she had a blue coat instead. She talked about it so much that finally her mother took her to the parrot who lived next to the tailor bird.

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“You may change your coat for a blue one,” said the parrot, “but if you change you’ll have to give up something.”

“Oh, I’ll gladly give up anything if only I may have a blue coat instead of a green and gold one,” said the discontented little beetle.

When she received her new coat she thought it was very beautiful. It was a lovely shade of blue and it had silvery white lights upon it like the light of the stars. When she put it on, however, she discovered that it was not hard like the green and gold one. From that day to this the blue beetles’ coats have not been hard and firm. That is the reason why the jewellers have difficulty in using them in pins and necklaces like other beetles.

From the moment that the little beetle put on her new blue coat she never grew again. From that day to this the blue beetles have been much smaller than the green and gold ones.

When the Brazilians made their flag they took for it a square of green the colour of the green beetle’s coat. Within this square they placed a diamond of gold like the golden lights which play upon the green beetle’s back. Then, within the diamond, they drew a circle to represent the round earth and they coloured it blue like the coat of the blue beetle. Upon the blue circle they placed stars of silvery white like the silvery white lights on the back of the blue beetle. About the blue circle of the earth which they thus pictured they drew a band of white, and upon this band they wrote the motto of their country, “Ordem e Progresso, order and progress.””

NOTES:
From the book ‘Fairytales from Brazil’ subtitled ‘How and why tales from Brazilian folk-lore’, which contains 18 Brazilian folktales.
Author: Elsie Spicer Eells
Published: 1917
Publisher: Dodd, Mead and Company, Inc., Chicago

folkloreandfairytales.wordpress.com

Grade 3 — Social Studies Curriculum

Topic outline

General

Third Grade Social Studies
Communities Around the World

Learning About People and Places

* Many ELA lessons can be incorporated into the Literacy or Social Studies Block. Optional/Supplemental Resources are labeled.*

PLEASE CHECK BACK FOR REVISIONS!

This framework integrates existing New York State Learning Standards and the New York State Core Curriculum for Social Studies into a single 3-part document. It is intended to serve as a guide for local districts to develop their Social Studies curriculum. It incorporates the New York State Common Core Learning Standards and recommends the use of the C3 Inquiry Arc as instructional methodology. Social studies practices are identified, as well as the key ideas, conceptual understandings and content specifications.

Topic 2

Topic 3

Topic 4

Universal Human Rights: Do People Around the World Care About Children’s Rights?

(2018-2019 Possible Inquiry Activity)

moodle.northport.k12.ny.us

How beetle got her colors

How the Finch Got Her Colours

Long ago, when the world was new, all the birds were grey. They had no colours.

One bright spring day, the Great Bird, their king, called all the birds together. The birds gathered curiously. They hopped and flapped and chirped and chirruped and chattered amongst themselves. Why had the Great Bird called them together? What did he have to tell them?

The Great Bird looked around at the assembled birds, then pointed with one wing towards the sky. The other birds turned to look and gasped with astonishment – a giant rainbow shimmered in the sky. The birds had never seen anything so beautiful, and even the noisiest ones fell silent. They stared and stared at the rainbow as it glowed violet and indigo, blue and green, yellow, orange and red. ‘Oh, if only our feathers were as beautiful as the rainbow,’ cried the birds wistfully.

The Great Bird nodded his head and said, ‘I will give each of you one of the colours of the rainbow. Choose the colour you want, and it shall be yours.’

At once the birds began to push and shove, each trying to get ahead of the others so she could have her choice of colour first.

‘I want green, I’ll take green!’ screeched the parrot.

‘Red! Give me red!’ screamed the cardinal.

‘I want the blue!’ cried the jay.

‘Yellow for me, yellow for me,’ trilled the canary.

Only one little bird sat quietly, waiting for her turn. That little bird was the Finch.

At last all the colours were taken. ‘Now each of you have a wonderful colour,’ said the Great Bird, ‘and just in time, for the rainbow has gone.’

But just then, the Great Bird saw the Finch, sitting quietly in her corner. ‘Come here, little Finch!’ cried the Great Bird. ‘Why didn’t you ask for a colour?’

‘I was waiting for my turn,’ said the Finch.

‘But now all the colours are gone,’ said the Great Bird.

At this the Finch looked very sad, and a great big tear rolled down her cheek. ‘Does this mean that I will always be grey?’ she sighed.

‘Always be grey because you would not push, and peck the others out of your way? Always be grey because you did not scream and shriek and were polite enough to wait your turn? No, indeed you shall not be grey!’ And the Great Bird called back all the other birds who were about to fly away with their glorious colours. He made them line up, and pass by him in order. From each bird he took a bit of colour – green from the parrot, red from the cardinal, blue from the jay, yellow from the canary, shimmering emerald from the peacock, delicate pink from the flamingo – and he gave all these bits of colour to the Finch.

And when he was done, the little Finch shone with all the colours of the rainbow! There they were, all the colours, beautifully blended into her feathers. The other birds gathered round in admiration, and declared the little Finch who waited her turn the prettiest bird of all!

www.longlongtimeago.com

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