How to destroy domestic bedbugs

Should I Use a Fogger?

While we can’t tell you whether or not to use a fogger, we can explain some things about foggers and how to use them safely to help you decide.

We register all pesticides to ensure they are safe to use, presuming you follow the label directions. This includes foggers (the full name is “total release foggers,” to distinguish them from pesticide application equipment that is designed to emit a fog-like pesticide spray, but is under the control of the user).

When and How to Use a Fogger

To use a total release fogger, you place the canister in an appropriate location, activate it, and leave the room (perhaps even leave the building if directed by the label).

Total release foggers are approved for use against a variety of indoor pests, including bed bugs. Not all foggers are labeled for use against bed bugs, so you need to read the label before purchasing a fogger to ensure you are getting one that lists bed bugs on the label.

Effectiveness of Foggers

Questions have been raised about the effectiveness of total release foggers against bed bugs. Bed bugs often hide, especially during the day. Foggers should not be used as the sole source of bed bug control. The pesticides used in total release foggers must contact the pest to kill it. If the material does not reach the cracks and crevices where bed bugs are hiding, they will not be killed.

Fogger Safety Tips and Videos

If you are considering using a fogger:

  • Read the label before purchasing it to be sure to buy a product registered for use against bed bugs.
  • Read the label before using the product, to ensure you use it correctly.
    • Only use the number of foggers required for your space. More is not better and too much could cause an explosion.
    • Turn off pilot lights and unplug appliances to reduce the potential for an explosion.
    • Leave the room or the building as directed by the label and don’t return until the amount of time listed on the label has passed.
  • View our v >

    Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem.

    www.epa.gov

    Finding and Using Bed Bug Pestic >

    • Use EPA’s Bed Bug Product Search tool to help you find a pesticide product
    • Consult a pest management professional to inspect your residence and, if needed, apply approved pesticides to treat any infestation.
    • The Cooperative Extension Service office in your area can assist with choosing appropriate pesticides for your area and situation.
    • Read When Treatments Don’t Work before reapplying or trying a different product.
    • Sometimes people want to try things to control bed bugs that are not legal. See Stay Legal and Safe in Treating for Bed Bugs for more information.

    EPA has registered more than 300 products for use against bed bugs. Most of these can be used by consumers, but a few are registered for use only by specially trained professionals. EPA evaluates data on the safety and the effectiveness of the products before approving them.

    These 300 registered products fall into seven chemical classes of pesticides that are currently registered and widely used for bed bug control:

    There is also an additional chemical class registered for a very narrow use pattern. Dichlorvos (also known as DDVP, an organophosphate) is registered as a pest strip for treatment of small enclosures.

    Each chemical class kills bed bugs using a different mode of action. It can be helpful to use pesticides that differ in their mode of action because it can reduce the likelihood that the bugs will develop resistance. The following paragraphs discuss in more details each of the more commonly used chemical classes for bed bugs.

    Pyrethrins and Pyrethroids: Pyrethrins and pyrethroids are the most common compounds used to control bed bugs and other indoor pests. Pyrethrins are botanical insecticides derived from chrysanthemum flowers. Pyrethroids are synthetic chemical insecticides that act like pyrethrins. Both compounds are lethal to bed bugs and can flush bed bugs out of their hiding places and kill them. However, where resistant bed bug strains exist, these treatments may cause them to move to a new hiding place or temporarily flush them out of existing locations.

    Some bed bug populations have become resistant to pyrethrins and pyrethroids. Sometimes using a combination product (either multiple pyrethroid or pyrethrin active ingredients, or one that combines different chemical classes into the same product) can improve bed bug control. It can also be helpful to switch to an entirely different chemical class to control resistant bed bug populations.

    Some pyrethroid pesticides come in the form of a total release fogger. See Should I Use a Fogger? for information about fogger use and safety.

    Desiccants: Desiccants work by destroying the waxy, protective outer coating on a bed bug. Once this coating is destroyed, the bed bugs will slowly dehydrate and die. Desiccants are a valuable tool in bed bug control. Because desiccants work through a physical mode of action, the bed bugs cannot become resistant to desiccants as they can to pesticides with other modes of action. In addition, they have a long-lasting effect and don’t disturb normal bed bug activities.

    Examples of desiccants include:

    When using desiccants to control bed bugs it is critical to use those that are registered by EPA and labeled for bed bug control. Desiccants that are intended for other uses, such as food-grade or for use in swimming pools, pose an increased inhalation risk to people. Use of desiccants is limited to cracks and crevices use only to reduce inhalation risk.

    Biochemicals: Cold pressed neem oil is the only biochemical pesticide registered for use against bed bugs. Cold pressed neem oil is pressed directly from seeds of the Neem tree, a tropical evergreen tree found in Southeast Asia and Africa. The oil contains various compounds that have insecticidal and medicinal properties. It is also used in making products including shampoos, toothpaste, soaps, and cosmetics. Performance trials conducted at the approved label rates show both products control bed bug adults, nymphs, and eggs.

    Pyrroles: Chlorfenapyr is the only pyrrole pesticide currently registered for use against bed bugs. The compound is a pro-insecticide, i.e. the biological activity depends on its activation to form another chemical. The new chemical disrupts certain functions in the bed bug’s cells, causing its death.

    Neonicotinoids: Neonicotinoids are synthetic forms of nicotine and act on the nicotinic receptors of the nervous system by causing nerves to fire continually until they fail. Because neonicotinoids use this different mode of action, bed bugs that are resistant to other pesticides will remain susceptible to the neonicotinoid.

    Insect growth regulators: Insect growth regulators are chemicals that mimic juvenile growth hormones in insects. They work by either altering the production of chitin (the compound insects use to make their hard external “shell” or exoskeleton) or by altering an insect’s development into adulthood. Some growth regulators force the insect to develop too rapidly, while others stop development.

    Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem.

    www.epa.gov

    Preparing for Treatment Against Bed Bugs

    Whether you are hiring a pest management professional or trying to eliminate the bugs yourself, properly preparing your home is an essential first step. Taking these steps before starting out will help speed the process and reduce control costs.

    Reduce Clutter–a Great Hiding Place for Bed Bugs

    • When reducing clutter take care that you don’t spread the bed bugs:
      • Don’t move items from the infested area to a non-infested area.
      • Place trash or other infested items directly into plastic trash bags. When full, immediately carry the bags to an outside bin.
    • Get rid of excess magazines and newspapers.
    • Keep clothing off the floor.
    • Eliminate all cardboard boxes (the bugs can hide in the cardboard). Replace with plastic boxes, if you need the storage.
    • Get rid of clothing and other items you no longer use (but make sure they are free of bed bugs first so you don’t spread them).

    Make Your Bed an Island

    • Move the bed at least 6 inches away from the wall.
    • Ensure all bed bugs, larvae, and eggs are removed from the bed, frame and headboard.
    • Place bed-bug-proof covers (often called encasements) or liners on your mattress and boxspring (available in home stores or online).
      • Take care that these covers have zippers that close completely and that they are sturdy enough to last for a year.
      • Any bed bugs trapped inside will eventually starve to death, and other bed bugs won’t be able to hide in the bed or box spring.
    • Make sure all bedding is tucked under mattress and does not touch the floor.
    • Place bed bug interceptors under each leg of the bed (available in home stores or online).
      • Interceptors will trap any bed bugs that try to climb the leg of the bed. In the beginning, you will inspect them daily.
      • Plan to use the interceptors for at least a year – they will be important to your post-control monitoring efforts.
    • Remove anything under the bed.
      • Store in the same room to avoid spreading the infestation.
      • Inspect and clean or discard as appropriate.

    Clean All Items Within a Bed-Bug-Infested Living Area

    • Heat treat clothing, bedding, and other items that can withstand a hot dryer (household dryer at high heat for 30 minutes), which will kill bed bugs and eggs.
      • Washing alone might not do the job.
      • Store clean items in a sealed plastic bag to ensure they remain bug free
    • Physically inspect and clean furniture, baseboards, behind outlet and switch covers, etc. to remove visible bed bugs or eggs.
    • Use sealed plastic bags to transport any items that are being moved from one area to another (e.g., clothing or other items to be heated in the dryer).
    • Remove and clean drapes and the drapery hardware.
    • Look for bed bugs, eggs, and other bed bug evidence (e.g., shed skins, hatched eggs) on furniture and remove–this will also help in evaluating treatment success.
    • Vacuum thoroughly, then remove and dispose of the vacuum bag:
      • Seal the vacuum bag in a plastic bag.
      • Place in trash outside.

    Eliminate Bed Bug Habitats

    • See “reduce clutter.”
    • Caulk cracks or crevices around baseboards.
    • Repair any wallboard damage, ensure wallpaper is not loose.
    • Check electrical outlets and wall switches for evidence of bed bugs.
      • Clean if needed.
      • Tape or caulk the rims to prevent bed bugs from getting behind the plates.

    Additional Information

    • Preparing Your House for Bedbug Treatments — North Carolina State University Exit
    • Preparing Your Home for Bed Bug Treatment — Michigan State University Exit

    Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem.

    www.epa.gov

    Do-it-yourself Bed Bug Control

    Can you treat and eliminate the bed bugs on your own? Bed bugs are challenging pests to get rid of, since they hide so well and reproduce so quickly. In addition, the egg stage is resistant to many forms of treatment, so a single attempt may not be sufficient to complete the job.

    Treating bed bugs is complex. Your likelihood of success depends on many factors, including:

    • Extent of the infestation.
    • Site-specific challenges.
      • Clutter.
      • Neighbors with infestations.
      • Ability of all of the residents to participate.

    Achieving complete control can take weeks to months, depending on the nature and extent of the infestation, and everyone will need to cooperate and do their part.

    Before starting, you should lay out all of the steps on a calendar. The following steps will help you begin:

    Keep the Infestation from Spreading

    • Anything removed from the room should be placed in a sealed plastic bag and treated.
      • Items that cannot be treated should be placed in a sealed plastic bag and left for an extended period of time to ensure any active bugs are dead (research shows variation in the length of time needed, but it can be as long as a year).
    • Empty the vacuum after each use.
      • Seal the bag and throw it out in an outdoor trash container.
    • Don’t discard furniture if you can eliminate the bed bugs from it.
    • If furniture cannot be salvaged, discard it responsibly. Destroy it so someone else won’t be tempted to bring it into their home. For example:
      • Rip covers and remove stuffing from furniture items.
      • Use spray paint to mark furniture with “Bed Bugs.”
    • Take steps to have infested items picked up as soon as possible by the trash collection agency.

    Prepare for Treatment

    Jumping straight into control is tempting, but won’t work. Preparing for treatment is essential to getting successful control. It will also help by making it easier for you to monitor for bed bugs that haven’t been completely eliminated. This preparation should be conducted whether you are doing the treatment yourself or hiring a professional.

    Kill the Bed Bugs

    • Make sure the methods you select are safe, effective and legal. See What’s Legal, What’s Not for more information.
    • Consider non-chemical methods of killing bed bugs. Some will be more useful than others.
      • Heat treatment using a clothes dryer on high heat, black plastic bags in the sun or a hot, closed car (pest management professionals have other methods that are not suitable for non-trained individuals to use).
      • Cold treatment can be successful in the home environment if the freezer is set to 0 o F. You must leave the items in the freezer at that temperature for four days. Always use a thermometer to check the temperature, since home freezers are not always set to 0 o .
      • Steam cleaners (wet or dry) can penetrate into cracks and fabrics to treat carpets, baseboards, bed frames, and other furniture. Steam temperature must be at least 130 o F, but should not have a forceful airflow (use diffuser) or it may cause bed bugs to scatter.
      • Reducing the numbers of bugs with these and other non-chemical methods is helpful, but is unlikely to entirely eliminate the infestation.
    • If needed, use pestic >Top of Page

      Evaluate and Prevent

      • Continue to inspect for presence of bed bugs, at least every 7 days, in case any eggs remained.
        • Interceptors (placed under the legs of furniture to catch bed bugs and keep them from climbing the legs; commercial and do-it-yourself versions available), traps or other methods of monitoring can be used.
      • Continue to implement preventive measures.

      For additional information, please see:

      Contact Us to ask a question, provide feedback, or report a problem.

      www.epa.gov

      How to Kill Bed Bugs with Household Items

      It’s perfectly natural to want to eliminate a bed bug infestation without spending a ton of money on professional-grade products or a treatment by a pest control operator. When people discover that they have bed bugs, they often turn to do-it-yourself recommendations from discussions on the Internet. These suggestions might include household items, some of which are recommended more often than others. Let’s take a closer look at some of the most popular items and how they might be used against bed bugs:

      Rubbing Alcohol

      First up is the most commonly recommended tool by far: rubbing alcohol diluted in water. This is suggested because alcohol can kill bed bugs on contact, and evaporates shortly after, so it’s considered safe for use pretty much anywhere in a home. A recurring theme in these recommendations are household items that are considered to be safer for people than mainstream chemicals.

      While alcohol can kill bed bugs on contact, it’s not going to kill nearly enough of bed bugs to be considered effective. In lab studies, even 99 percent concentrations of alcohol only killed between 40% to 60% of the adults that were sprayed. On top of that, alcohol has no long-lasting residual effect, and doesn’t affect bed bug eggs. 60% sounds good, but a contact killer should be able to kill a lot closer to 100% of the bed bugs you see. Otherwise, a shoe or a blowtorch would be the more reliable tool for the job. (Editor’s note: please don’t use a blowtorch.)

      In a bed bug treatment, alcohol is basically an attempt to fill the role of a contact spray, which is an insecticide spray that kills bed bugs on contact. These sprays are proven to kill at a higher rate than rubbing alcohol could manage, and are extremely versatile in where they can be applied. Pair contact sprays with a couple of residual sprays, and you have a combination of chemicals that will kill bed bugs quickly now, and keep killing over the next few weeks.

      Essential Oils

      The next recommendation is a mixture of essential oils. You might see one of many oils or combinations of oils in online discussion, whether it’s clove oil, cedar wood, lavender, or a combination of mint oils. The use of these against bed bugs dates back centuries, as their simple method of suffocating the bugs predates the use of sophisticated chemical killers.

      The use of various oils against bed bugs is encouraged by various studies that have shown these oils successfully killing bed bugs. However, those tests tend to use bed bugs that do not have the opportunity to feed on anyone. In real-world scenarios, where the bugs can still reach a person and feed after being sprayed, they usually survive.

      The main reason people seem to favor the essential oil option is that it’s considered a natural and chemical-free alternative to pesticide sprays. What they don’t realize is that today’s home pesticides are carefully regulated by the EPA to make sure that they’re safe for indoor use. The EPA also requires that health and safety guidelines are included in the product label and MSDS, to ensure that anyone who uses a spray has instructions on how to use it safely and effectively. When used correctly, even our strongest bed bug sprays won’t have any effect on you, but they will kill bed bugs more effectively than any mixture of household items like herbs or oils.

      Oil-based products have been so frequently touted as natural bed bug killers that they’ve even attracted government intervention. The Federal Trade Commission has charged multiple companies with deceptive advertising for overhyping their cedar oil-based products’ ability to treat an infestation. By claiming that their products can stop and prevent bed bug infestations, these marketers opened the door to government lawsuits for misleading their customers.

      Double-Sided Tape

      Another common suggestion is to use either double-sided tape or Vaseline. The theory is that you can stop bed bugs from climbing the legs of your bed by applying these to the legs. Unfortunately, report after report from customers has indicated that these solutions simply don’t work. I hear all the time about bed bugs crawling right over Vaseline, carpet tape, and other adhesive traps like glue boards.

      If a trap method does not effectively stop bed bugs, then I wouldn’t consider it. Instead, I would recommend a set of ClimbUp Insect Interceptors. These are pitfall traps that go under the legs of your bed and trap bed bugs in a talcum-lined pitfall that is too slick and smooth for them to climb out of. ClimbUp Interceptors have been proven over the years to be effective, and are an essential part of our recommended treatment process.

      Clothes Iron

      Bed bugs are highly vulnerable to heat; exposing them to a certain amount of direct heat will kill them instantly, while lower temperatures can kill them in a matter of minutes. This is why many forms of heat treatments are recommended. Some methods, such as steamers and portable heaters, have been proven effective through professional use and are quickly becoming standard issue in holistic treatment arsenals.

      Some less proven heat weapons have been suggested online, such as clothes irons. Clothes irons might reach the temperature needed to kill bed bugs, but the heat won’t penetrate deep into soft materials to where bed bugs might be hiding. You also can’t iron areas besides clothes and sheets, like cracks and crevices in walls, floors, and furniture. The metal surface and high surface heat would damage many of the materials it wasn’t designed to be used on.

      Hair Dryer

      A hair dryer might seem like a safer way to kill bed bugs with heat. Unfortunately, their maximum temperature is rarely more than 150 degrees. That heat level can kill bed bugs, but only if you maintain the heat over them for several minutes. So unless you want to follow each bug you see around with a hair dryer until they eventually die, you’d probably be better off just hitting them with the thing.

      Just to be clear, you can kill bed bugs with heat. It’s just a matter of using the right equipment. A high-pressure steamer is the weapon of choice for killing bed bugs on contact, since their steam can surpass 200 degrees, and can penetrate deep into soft materials like mattresses and upholstered furniture. You can also use a steamer on more than just clothes or other fabrics; a steamer can kill bed bugs hiding along baseboards, floorboards, window sills, door frames, and the edges of the carpet.

      If you need to treat items that can’t be laundered or steamed, you can use a portable bed bug heater, like a ZappBug Oven or a ThermalStrike Ranger. These heaters can safely treat household items like books, papers, CDs, and dry clean only clothing. Not only are bed bug heaters an effective part of a bed bug treatment process, but they’re one of the most popular prevention tools on the market. When you come home from a trip, just put your suitcase in the heater, zip it shut, and turn it on. In just a few hours, any bed bugs or eggs hiding in your belongings will be dead.

      A lot of DIY bed bug recommendations involving household items stem from the desire to solve your bed bug problem without spending money or resorting to chemicals. Unfortunately, these recommendations don’t always pan out. Bloggers and forum posters usually aren’t professionals (this blog author being one of the exceptions). They haven’t done the same research, and they tend not to have much experience getting rid of bed bugs themselves.

      When professionals need to treat an infestation, they don’t reach for rubbing alcohol or cedar oil or a blow dryer. They use a proven treatment process that involves a combination of proven products to get the job done. It’s not about whether or not a certain item can kill bed bugs, it’s about whether that item is the ideal part of a treatment that will actually get rid of an infestation. After all, your shoe would have a 100% kill rate on any bed bugs you smack with it – that doesn’t mean you can expect to be bed bug free after a diligent afternoon of shoe-wielding.

      How to Kill Bed Bugs with Household Items

      It’s perfectly natural to want to eliminate a bed bug infestation without spending a ton of money on professional-grade products or a treatment by a pest control operator. When people discover that they have bed bugs, they often turn to do-it-yourself recommendations from discussions on the Internet. These suggestions might include household items, some of which are recommended more often than others. Let’s take a closer look at some of the most popular items and how they might be used against bed bugs:

      Rubbing Alcohol

      First up is the most commonly recommended tool by far: rubbing alcohol diluted in water. This is suggested because alcohol can kill bed bugs on contact, and evaporates shortly after, so it’s considered safe for use pretty much anywhere in a home. A recurring theme in these recommendations are household items that are considered to be safer for people than mainstream chemicals.

      While alcohol can kill bed bugs on contact, it’s not going to kill nearly enough of bed bugs to be considered effective. In lab studies, even 99 percent concentrations of alcohol only killed between 40% to 60% of the adults that were sprayed. On top of that, alcohol has no long-lasting residual effect, and doesn’t affect bed bug eggs. 60% sounds good, but a contact killer should be able to kill a lot closer to 100% of the bed bugs you see. Otherwise, a shoe or a blowtorch would be the more reliable tool for the job. (Editor’s note: please don’t use a blowtorch.)

      In a bed bug treatment, alcohol is basically an attempt to fill the role of a contact spray, which is an insecticide spray that kills bed bugs on contact. These sprays are proven to kill at a higher rate than rubbing alcohol could manage, and are extremely versatile in where they can be applied. Pair contact sprays with a couple of residual sprays, and you have a combination of chemicals that will kill bed bugs quickly now, and keep killing over the next few weeks.

      Essential Oils

      The next recommendation is a mixture of essential oils. You might see one of many oils or combinations of oils in online discussion, whether it’s clove oil, cedar wood, lavender, or a combination of mint oils. The use of these against bed bugs dates back centuries, as their simple method of suffocating the bugs predates the use of sophisticated chemical killers.

      The use of various oils against bed bugs is encouraged by various studies that have shown these oils successfully killing bed bugs. However, those tests tend to use bed bugs that do not have the opportunity to feed on anyone. In real-world scenarios, where the bugs can still reach a person and feed after being sprayed, they usually survive.

      The main reason people seem to favor the essential oil option is that it’s considered a natural and chemical-free alternative to pesticide sprays. What they don’t realize is that today’s home pesticides are carefully regulated by the EPA to make sure that they’re safe for indoor use. The EPA also requires that health and safety guidelines are included in the product label and MSDS, to ensure that anyone who uses a spray has instructions on how to use it safely and effectively. When used correctly, even our strongest bed bug sprays won’t have any effect on you, but they will kill bed bugs more effectively than any mixture of household items like herbs or oils.

      Oil-based products have been so frequently touted as natural bed bug killers that they’ve even attracted government intervention. The Federal Trade Commission has charged multiple companies with deceptive advertising for overhyping their cedar oil-based products’ ability to treat an infestation. By claiming that their products can stop and prevent bed bug infestations, these marketers opened the door to government lawsuits for misleading their customers.

      Double-Sided Tape

      Another common suggestion is to use either double-sided tape or Vaseline. The theory is that you can stop bed bugs from climbing the legs of your bed by applying these to the legs. Unfortunately, report after report from customers has indicated that these solutions simply don’t work. I hear all the time about bed bugs crawling right over Vaseline, carpet tape, and other adhesive traps like glue boards.

      If a trap method does not effectively stop bed bugs, then I wouldn’t consider it. Instead, I would recommend a set of ClimbUp Insect Interceptors. These are pitfall traps that go under the legs of your bed and trap bed bugs in a talcum-lined pitfall that is too slick and smooth for them to climb out of. ClimbUp Interceptors have been proven over the years to be effective, and are an essential part of our recommended treatment process.

      Clothes Iron

      Bed bugs are highly vulnerable to heat; exposing them to a certain amount of direct heat will kill them instantly, while lower temperatures can kill them in a matter of minutes. This is why many forms of heat treatments are recommended. Some methods, such as steamers and portable heaters, have been proven effective through professional use and are quickly becoming standard issue in holistic treatment arsenals.

      Some less proven heat weapons have been suggested online, such as clothes irons. Clothes irons might reach the temperature needed to kill bed bugs, but the heat won’t penetrate deep into soft materials to where bed bugs might be hiding. You also can’t iron areas besides clothes and sheets, like cracks and crevices in walls, floors, and furniture. The metal surface and high surface heat would damage many of the materials it wasn’t designed to be used on.

      Hair Dryer

      A hair dryer might seem like a safer way to kill bed bugs with heat. Unfortunately, their maximum temperature is rarely more than 150 degrees. That heat level can kill bed bugs, but only if you maintain the heat over them for several minutes. So unless you want to follow each bug you see around with a hair dryer until they eventually die, you’d probably be better off just hitting them with the thing.

      Just to be clear, you can kill bed bugs with heat. It’s just a matter of using the right equipment. A high-pressure steamer is the weapon of choice for killing bed bugs on contact, since their steam can surpass 200 degrees, and can penetrate deep into soft materials like mattresses and upholstered furniture. You can also use a steamer on more than just clothes or other fabrics; a steamer can kill bed bugs hiding along baseboards, floorboards, window sills, door frames, and the edges of the carpet.

      If you need to treat items that can’t be laundered or steamed, you can use a portable bed bug heater, like a ZappBug Oven or a ThermalStrike Ranger. These heaters can safely treat household items like books, papers, CDs, and dry clean only clothing. Not only are bed bug heaters an effective part of a bed bug treatment process, but they’re one of the most popular prevention tools on the market. When you come home from a trip, just put your suitcase in the heater, zip it shut, and turn it on. In just a few hours, any bed bugs or eggs hiding in your belongings will be dead.

      A lot of DIY bed bug recommendations involving household items stem from the desire to solve your bed bug problem without spending money or resorting to chemicals. Unfortunately, these recommendations don’t always pan out. Bloggers and forum posters usually aren’t professionals (this blog author being one of the exceptions). They haven’t done the same research, and they tend not to have much experience getting rid of bed bugs themselves.

      When professionals need to treat an infestation, they don’t reach for rubbing alcohol or cedar oil or a blow dryer. They use a proven treatment process that involves a combination of proven products to get the job done. It’s not about whether or not a certain item can kill bed bugs, it’s about whether that item is the ideal part of a treatment that will actually get rid of an infestation. After all, your shoe would have a 100% kill rate on any bed bugs you smack with it – that doesn’t mean you can expect to be bed bug free after a diligent afternoon of shoe-wielding.

      www.bedbugsupply.com

Share:
No Comments

Leave a Reply

Your e-mail will not be published. All fields are required.