How Mosquitoes Came To Be Story

How Mosquitoes Came To Be Story

Long time ago there was a giant who loved to kill humans, eat their flesh, and drink their blood. He was especially fond of human hearts. «Unless we can get rid of the giant,» people said, «none of us will be left,» and they called a council to discuss what to do.

One man said, «I think I know how to kill the monster,» and he went to the place where the giant had last been seen. There he lay down and pretended to be dead. Soon the giant came along.
Seeing the man lying there, he said: «These humans are making it easy for me. Now I don’t even have to catch and kill them; they die right on my trail, probably from fear of me!»
The giant touched the body. «Ah, good,» he said, «this one is still warm and fresh. What a tasty meal he’ll make; I can’t wait to roast his heart.»
The giant flung the man over his shoulder, and the man let his head hang down as if he were dead.

Carrying the man home, the giant dropped him in the middle of the floor right near the fireplace. Then he saw that there was no firewood, and went to get some.
As soon as the monster had left, the man got up and grabbed the giant’s huge skinning knife. Just then the giant’s son came in, bending low to enter. He was still small as giants go, and the man held the big knife to his throat. «Quick, tell me, where’s your father’s heart? Tell me or I’ll slit your throat!»
The giant’s son was scared. He said: «My father’s heart is in his left heel.»
Just then the giant’s left foot appeared in the entrance, and the man swiftly plunged the knife into the heel. The monster screamed and fell down dead.
Yet, the giant still spoke.

«Though I’m dead, though you killed me, I’m going to keep on eating you and all the humans in the world forever!»


«That’s what you think!» said the man. «I’m about to make sure that you never eat anyone again.» He cut the giant’s body into pieces and burned each one in the fire. Then he took the ashes and threw them into the air for the winds to scatter.

Instantly each of the particles turned into a mosquito. The cloud of ashes became a cloud of mosquitoes, and from their midst the man heard the giant’s voice laughing, saying: «Yes, I’ll eat your people until the end of time.»
As the monster spoke, the man felt a sting, and a mosquito started sucking his blood, and then many mosquitoes stung him, and he began to scratch himself.

www.boyscouttrail.com

How Mosquitoes Came To Be: The Giant Lives On

Every time I read the Tlingit Legend, “How Mosquitoes Came To Be,” there
are certain questions that come to mind about where the legend came from and who
wrote it. The legend was first published in 1883 and later found by Richard
Erdoes, who included it in one of his publications, American Indian Myths and
Legends. Why is the human race so selfish to think we can be the hunter and not
the hunted. Although giants could be a dominant presence in our lives, humans
prove that they will not be over-taken.

Each time I read the Tlingit legend, a new question would arise in my
mind as to how this legend came to be and particularly, who wrote it? The first
question I thought of was, is he the only giant on the planet? This was
answered for me with the introduction of the giant’s son. As I read on,
something seemed puzzling to me, the fact that why humans are so selfish to
think they are better than giants, let alone anything else. For instance, why
is it okay for humans to kill a chicken, roast it and eat it, and a giant is bad
to “kill humans, eat their flesh, and drink their blood”(11)? Later in the
story we learn that the giant also liked to roast the hearts of humans. Another
puzzling question I asked myself is, if the giant was stabbed by the human and
“The monster screamed and fell down dead.”(12), why did the giant still speak?
I know this is a legend or maybe just a fictionous story, but if the giant is
also a spirit then that would be helpful when reading the legend. I will
analyze these questions in hopes of understanding the problems with humans and
giants, which I might add is still being dealt with today with mosquitoes
everywhere.

My first question, if this giant was the only one on the planet, seemed
answered toward the end of the story with the introduction of the giant’s son.

When the human threatened the life of the boy giant as he asked where the heart
of his father was, why didn’t he kill the boy anyway? As we all know, a boy
will eventually become a person, and the boy is in fact a giant, therefore by
killing the giant by stabbing him in the left heel, the human simply forgot the
son. There are a lot of parts in this legend that are very unclear and when we
ask why, who, what, where and when, we are led into yet another question to be
answered. Which leads me into my next question, What makes a human better than
a giant?
In the Tlingit legend, a human feels threatened by a giant and kills it,
why? I tend to think giants like to kill and eat humans, just as humans like to
kill and eat cows, chicken and other animals. So tell me gentle reader, what is
the difference? Is it that we are humans and we cannot be subject to be hunted
as we do other animals. The only explanation is that human nature will only
lead us to believe that we will not be overcome by anything except ourselves.

One possibility for the actions of the humans against the giant would be that
the giant can speak, and shows some intelligence, after all he did build a home
for his son and himself. Therefore the humans might have thought that the giant
was beyond reasoning with, thus the basis for killing the giant. Another
question that poked at my brain was that even though the giant was declared dead,
he still spoke the words “Though I am dead, though you killed me, I am going to
keep eating on you and all the other humans in the world forever”(12). Okay,
maybe as he was dying he muttered those words, but how do you explain the
laughing as his ashes were being thrown into the wind? If the giant was in fact
burnt to ashes how could he possibly laugh and talk to the human. My last
argument is how the ending was abruptly cut short and how it left the reader
hanging without knowing what happened to the giant’s son. Also, if there is a
boy giant, what about the mother giant? I often questioned the credibility of
this legend and the author, but that is something that has to be considered when
reading “How Mosquitoes Came To Be.”
I did a little research about this legend, curious about who wrote it
and when exactly it was written. According to the paragraph at the top of page
11 from the legend, the essay was first published in 1883 in an English-language
source and was found by Richard Erdoes. Checking the gnosis system in the
Rasmuson library for several possibilities as to who and when the legend was
written, I came up short.

This legend was a simple story about a small community with a big
problem. A giant who likes to eat people was a menace who needed to be dealt
with. One human decided to take matters into his own hands and try to kill the
giant himself. This human played opossum on the trail of the giant and
eventually was picked up by the giant. The giant, unknowing that he was being
set up to be killed, was overjoyed that he could find a fresh human to feed upon.





Throwing the human over his shoulder, he finds his way back home and drops the
person on the floor and retreats outside to get some firewood.

In the mean time the human gets up off the floor and retrieves and huge
knife that belonged to the giant, just as the boy giant comes into the room.

The human immediately put the knife to the boy’s throat, threatening to kill him
if he did not reveal the place of his father’s heart. Scared from all of the
commotion that seemed to come from nowhere, the boy told the human his father’s
heart was in his left heel. Just then, the giant walked into the room, the
person immediately stabbed the giant in the left heel. As the giant collapsed
he vowed to continue to eat humans until the end of time. Foolishly, the human
told the giant he would never allow the giant to do such a thing and cut the
giant into pieces and burnt him to ashes. The human, thinking he has saved the
human race, threw the ashes into the wind. Just as the ashes were thrown into
the air, they immediately turned into mosquitoes and began to suck the human’s
blood. It seems that the giant got the last laugh, continuing to eat humans
until the end of time.


After reading this legend over and over, I find that looking beyond all
of the questions that have come to mind, I found the story to be a change of
pace verses the conventional ways about explaining the creation of insects.

Yet some parts of the legend seemed sketchy as to how this chain of events took
place. My biggest questions, which may never be answered, are who started the
legend and when it originated. Overall I enjoyed the legend and the creativity,
but after reading it several times the questions began to jump out at me like
crickets in the night. Humans need to learn that we are not the only
intelligent life on the planet, and if we ever did come across any giants, we
should try to act rationale instead of rash.

edulearn14.org

Oban’s Myths & Legends

A long time ago there were no mosquitoes and people didn’t have to put up with the buzzing, swatting and biting as we do today.

There was an Iroquois longhouse village on the Seneca River in what is now called New York State and the people there used elm-bark canoes to fish and visit other villages.

Early one winter morning a group of men went fishing. They paddled their canoes up-river to a stream that usually had plenty of fish.

Tall pine trees stretched their branches out along both sides of the water and cast shadows as the canoes passed.


Suddenly there was a loud rustling sound and something tall bent forward through the trees.



A Native American — Iroquois Story

The men in the first canoe saw a head with a long beak coming towards them. They shouted and tried to hit the thing with their paddles, but the sharp beak darted in and out among them, biting wherever it could reach.

Then the attack stopped and the long-headed creature swung back up and hid in the trees again. All the men stared after it, but it was gone.


The bites from the creature were very painful and the men in the first canoe could hardly move. Their friends towed them back to their village and a healing ceremony was held for them.

The men were very sick and one of them died the next day. Everyone in the village was upset and many were angry about the attack but didn’t know who or what to blame. A few days later another fishing party went out, to a different stream this time. Again a giant creature bent down from the trees and bit several men, and this time two men died.

www.planetozkids.com

Oban’s Myths & Legends

The chief sent messengers to other villages to tell them about the creatures, and they returned with stories about similar attacks in many places up and down the river. The Iroquois called the biting creatures mosquitoes.


No-one knew where they came from, how many of them there were, or which stream they would go to next. Many people died from their bites that winter.

Finally the chief of the first village organised a war party to hunt the mosquitoes and destroy them.

Twenty warriors in two great canoes floated down a stream where they thought the creatures might be.

They had bows and arrows, war clubs and hunting knives.

A dark shadow fell over the water and a giant beak ripped into the side of one of the canoes. The warriors shouted their war cry and shot arrows into the air. Two more mosquitoes lunged from the trees and attacked the men in the second canoe.

The battle was terrible and soon several of the warriors were killed. The others paddled the canoes to the bank, jumped out, ran into the forest and hid behind trees and bushes, with the mosquitoes following and stabbing after them.

Then something amazing happened. The mosquitoes couldn’t get through the thick bushes to reach the men. The warriors shot a cloud of arrows through the branches into the mosquitoes’ bodies, and they kept on loading their crossbows and shooting.


Many of the arrows hit the creatures and they began to stagger around. And when almost all of the arrows were gone, the mosquitoes bent over and slowly fell down. They had many wounds.

The warriors leapt out and hit them with their war clubs, again and again until the bodies of the creatures fell apart. They thought that they had won the battle.

But then tiny little mosquitoes began to appear in the blood of the bigger creatures, that had spilled on the ground.


Swarms of them flew up, buzzing and attacking the men.

The men tried to swat them away or squash them on their skin, until the tiny bites drove them back to their canoes and their village.

This is one story about how mosquitoes came to be. Even today these tiny insects like to bite people and taste their blood. They are angry that their bigger ancestors were killed and they want their revenge.

www.planetozkids.com

A Tlingit Legend

Long time ago there was a giant who loved to kill humans, eat their flesh, and drink their blood. He was especially fond of human hearts. «Unless we can get rid of the giant,» people said, «none of us will be left,» and they called a council to discuss ways and means. One man said, «I think I know how to kill the monster,» and he went to the place where the giant had last been seen. There he lay down and pretended to be dead.

Soon the giant came along. Seeing the man lying there, he said: «These humans are making it easy for me. Now I don’t even have to catch and kill them; they die right on my trail, probably from fear of me! «The giant touched the body. Ah, good, he said, «this one is still warm and fresh. What a tasty meal he’ll make; I can’t wait to roast his heart.» The giant flung the man over his shoulder, and the man let his head hang down as if he were dead.

Carrying the man home, the giant dropped him in the middle of the floor right near the fireplace. Then he saw that there was no firewood, and went to get some. As soon as the monster had left, the man got up and grabbed the giant’s huge skinning knife.

Just then the giant’s son came in, bending low to enter. He was still small as giants go, and the man held the big knife to his throat. «Quick, tell me, where’s your father’s heart? Tell me or I’ll slit your throat!» The giant’s son was scared. He said: «My father’s heart is in his left heel.»

Just then the giant’s left foot appeared in the entrance, and the man swiftly plunged the knife into the heel. The monster screamed and fell down dead. Yet, the giant still spoke. «Though I’m dead, though you killed me, I’m going to keep on eating you and all the humans in the world forever!»

«That’s what you think!» said the man. «I’m about to make sure that you never eat anyone again.» He cut the giant’s body into pieces and burned each one in the fire. Then he took the ashes and threw them into the air for the winds to scatter. Instantly each of the particles turned into a mosquito. The cloud of ashes became a cloud of mosquitoes, and from their midst the man heard the giant’s voice laughing, saying: «Yes, Ill eat you people until the end of time. «As the monster spoke, the man felt a sting, and a mosquito started sucking his blood, and then many mosquitoes stung him, and he began to scratch himself.

Return to Tlingit Legends

www.firstpeople.us

How Mosquitos Came To Be

Long time ago there was a giant who loved to kill humans, eat their flesh, and drink their blood. He was especially fond of human hearts. «Unless we can get rid of the giant,» people said, «none of us will be left,» and they called a council to discuss ways and means.

One man said, «I think I know how to kill the monster,» and he went to the place where the giant had las been seen. There he lay down and pretended to be dead.

Soon the giant came along. Seeing the man lying there, he said: «These humans are making it easy for me. Now I don’t even have to catch and kill them; they die right on my trail, probably from fear of me!»

The giant touched the boday.

«Ah, good,’ he said, «this one is still warm and fresh. What a tasty meal he’ll make; I can’t wait to roast his heart.»

The giant flung the man over his shoulder, and the man let his head hang down as if he were dead. Carrying the man home, the giant dropped him in the middle of the floor right near the fireplace. Then he saw that there was no firewood, and went to get some.

As soon as the monster had left, the man got up and grabbed the giant’s huge skinning knife. Just then the giant’s son came in, bending low to enter. He was still small as giants go, and the man held the big knife to his throat.

«Quick, tell me, where’s your father’s heart? Tell me or I’ll slit your throat!»


The giant’s son was scared. He said: «My father’s heart is in his left heel.»

Just then the giant’s left foot appeared in the entrance, and the man swiftly plunged the knife into the heel. The monster screamed and fell down dead.

Yet, the giant still spoke. «Though I’m dead, though you killed me, I’m going to keep on eating you and all the humans in the world forever!

«That’s what you think!» said the man. «I’m about to make sure that you never eat anyone again.» He cut the giant’s body into pieces and burned each one in the fire. Then he took the ashes and threw them into the air for the winds to scatter. Instantly each of the particles turned into a mosquito. The cloud of ashes became a cloud of mosquitoes, and from their midst the man heard the giant’s voice laughing, saying: «Yes, Ill eat you people until the end of time.»


As the monster spoke, the man felt a sting, and a mosquito started sucking his blood, and then many mosquitoes stung him, and he began to scratch himself.

www.angelfire.com

The Giant Lives On

Every time I read the Tlingit Legend, «How Mosquitoes Came To Be,» there
are certain questions that come to mind about where the legend came from and who
wrote it. The legend was first published in 1883 and later found by Richard
Erdoes, who included it in one of his publications, American Indian Myths and
Legends. Why is the human race so selfish to think we can be the hunter and not
the hunted. Although giants could be a dominant presence in our lives, humans
prove that they will not be over-taken.
Each time I read the Tlingit legend, a new question would arise in my
mind as to how this legend came to be and particularly, who wrote it? The first
question I thought of was, is he .

as his ashes were being thrown into the wind? If the giant was in fact
burnt to ashes how could he possibly laugh and talk to the human. My last
argument is how the ending was abruptly cut short and how it left the reader
hanging without knowing what happened to the giant’s son. Also, if there is a
boy giant, what about the mother giant? I often questioned the credibility of
this legend and the author, but that is something that has to be considered when
reading «How Mosquitoes Came To Be.»
I did a little research about this legend, curious about who wrote it
and when exactly it was written. According to the paragraph at the top of page
11 from the legend, the essay was first .

www.essayworld.com

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